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By Michael Pakenham and Michael Pakenham,SUN BOOKS EDITOR | May 9, 1999
New York -- A queue is wrapped around Cooper Union in west Greenwich Village. It is 6:20 p.m. on Tuesday, April 13, and in 40 minutes, Salman Rushdie is scheduled to give his first reading open to the American public in more than a decadeThe event coincides with publication of "The Ground Beneath Her Feet," the longest and most ambitious of Rushdie's seven novels. His appearance defies a decree that he be put to death.Ten years and two months ago, Iran's Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini informed all Muslims of the world that Rushdie "and all those involved in ['The Satanic Verses,' his fourth novel's]
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NEWS
By MARY CAROLE MCCAULEY and MARY CAROLE MCCAULEY,SUN REPORTER | September 25, 2005
One by one, the season's new arrivals beckon, waving us over to the tables on which they lounge so seductively: Shalimar the Clown by Salman Rushdie gives us a come-hither look. The March by E.L. Doctorow whispers low and sweet in our ear. Zadie Smith's On Beauty provocatively flutters its pages. Slow Man by J.M. Coetzee flips open its cover and spreads out before us on its spine. It's so tempting to sample the merchandise. And who, really, does it hurt? So many great new books, so little money.
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NEWS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | June 7, 2002
Compared with the rest of the insular world of American sports, horse racing is a bastion of internationalism. But its tolerance may be tested at tomorrow's Belmont Stakes. If his horse wins, a Saudi prince will capture not only one of the most elusive prizes in sports, but an American cultural symbol: the Triple Crown. And he will do it at the racetrack at Elmont, N.Y., which is 15 miles away from the World Trade Center site and was used as a staging area for rescue efforts Sept. 11. Prince Ahmed bin Salman, a member of the royal family that rules Saudi Arabia, is chairman of one of his nation's largest media companies, whose newspapers have angered some Saudis by denouncing Islamic militancy and Osama bin Laden.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Demanski and Laura Demanski,Special to the Sun | September 11, 2005
NOVEL SHALIMAR THE CLOWN By Salman Rushdie. Random House. 416 pages. It circumnavigates the globe and the last half of the 20th century like a hyperactive satellite, but Salman Rushdie's rich and restless new novel, Shalimar the Clown, has an ominous stillness at its center. Its title character is a dangerous cipher. We are supposed to believe that he is driven to homicidal monomania by romantic betrayal, but the heart of this Muslim Kashmiri is opaque. Shalimar the Clown makes vivid stopovers in 1990s Los Angeles and resistance-era France, but the novel's true home is the gorgeous, viciously contested land of Kashmir.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 31, 1997
Salman Rushdie, the author of "The Satanic Verses," who has lived in hiding for nearly a decade as the object of an open-ended Islamic death sentence, was married in secret on Thursday in the Hamptons on Long Island.The details of the wedding were not given, but Andrew Wylie, Rushdie's agent, said yesterday, "Elizabeth and Salman Rushdie are happy to confirm that they were married on Thursday, Aug. 28, in a small ceremony."Newspaper reporters in London, speaking on the condition of anonymity, said the new Mrs. Rushdie, whose maiden name is being withheld to protect her safety, is a poet who had collaborated with Rushdie on an anthology of modern Indian writing.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | February 5, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The first legal challenge to alleged bias against Arab-Americans since the Mideast war began is spreading rapidly, getting Pan American World Airways into deeper trouble.Pan Am, already being hauled into court and before a city human rights agency in New York City for denying a ticket to an Iraqi national, is facing the prospect of additional lawsuits elsewhere in the country in coming days, legal sources said yesterday."It wouldn't hurt to have Pan Am know that it will have other lawsuits in other places," according to one civil rights lawyer, who asked not to be identified.
NEWS
January 24, 1996
Despite his recent series of public -- determinedly public -- appearances, Indian-born British novelist Salman Rushdie must realize that danger stalks him still. He is rightly suspicious of what he calls the "charm offensive" by Iranian officials who say their government no longer intends to carry out the fatwa issued against Mr. Rushdie seven years ago by the late Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini. (That death sentence, accompanied by a $1 million bounty, was handed down for the alleged slanders of Islam in the novel, "The Satanic Verses."
NEWS
December 14, 1991
The most poignant commemoration of the First Amendment this week came from a man not covered by it. As though popping out of a cake, Salman Rushdie appeared on a heavily guarded stage at Columbia University in New York to say that "Free speech is life itself."He should know. Since his novel, "The Satanic Verses," was seen to blaspheme Islam, Mr. Rushdie has been under sentence of death. In 1989, the late Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini, spiritual ruler of Iran, instructed the faithful to murder him. He lives in secret protective custody, his private life destroyed, at great expense to British taxpayers.
NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | December 6, 1993
Paris. -- President Clinton met Salman Rushdie at the White House at the end of November ''to make the point that . . . freedom of speech includes especially the willingness to respect the rights of people who write things we do not agree with.''He had unfortunately to call in the press soon afterward to explain that he had not meant to endorse Mr. Rushdie's blasphemous treatment of Islam, a religion, the president rather unexpectedly added, whose culture and history he has been studying for more than 20 years.
BUSINESS
By Martin Schneider and Martin Schneider,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | October 10, 1999
It has almost become a rite of passage, Dundalk residents say.Their children pack up and leave the familiarity of Dundalk after high school or college looking to build a life elsewhere. But residents in the southeastern Baltimore County community don't worry about the future of their neighborhood.Like clockwork, it seems, the wanderers return home a few years later to settle down and raise a family."It's like we don't know how much we loved the area until we leave," said Tracy Salman, who grew up in Dundalk and moved to Kentucky after she got married.
NEWS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | June 7, 2002
Compared with the rest of the insular world of American sports, horse racing is a bastion of internationalism. But its tolerance may be tested at tomorrow's Belmont Stakes. If his horse wins, a Saudi prince will capture not only one of the most elusive prizes in sports, but an American cultural symbol: the Triple Crown. And he will do it at the racetrack at Elmont, N.Y., which is 15 miles away from the World Trade Center site and was used as a staging area for rescue efforts Sept. 11. Prince Ahmed bin Salman, a member of the royal family that rules Saudi Arabia, is chairman of one of his nation's largest media companies, whose newspapers have angered some Saudis by denouncing Islamic militancy and Osama bin Laden.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham and Michael Pakenham,SUN STAFF | September 2, 2001
It would be improbable for me to dislike a book by Salman Rushdie. He has written seven previous novels, a collection of short fiction and four nonfiction books. I have read much of that, and he has yet to fail me. He goes on growing - on me, at least. Now comes Fury (Random House, 259 pages, $24.95). It's remarkably short, concise, in contrast to his superb and sprawling The Moor's Last Sigh (1996, 434 pages) and The Ground Beneath Her Feet (1999, 575 pages). Rushdie narrates Fury in a voice that is cosmopolitan, confiding and casual.
BUSINESS
By Martin Schneider and Martin Schneider,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | October 10, 1999
It has almost become a rite of passage, Dundalk residents say.Their children pack up and leave the familiarity of Dundalk after high school or college looking to build a life elsewhere. But residents in the southeastern Baltimore County community don't worry about the future of their neighborhood.Like clockwork, it seems, the wanderers return home a few years later to settle down and raise a family."It's like we don't know how much we loved the area until we leave," said Tracy Salman, who grew up in Dundalk and moved to Kentucky after she got married.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham and Michael Pakenham,SUN BOOKS EDITOR | May 9, 1999
New York -- A queue is wrapped around Cooper Union in west Greenwich Village. It is 6:20 p.m. on Tuesday, April 13, and in 40 minutes, Salman Rushdie is scheduled to give his first reading open to the American public in more than a decadeThe event coincides with publication of "The Ground Beneath Her Feet," the longest and most ambitious of Rushdie's seven novels. His appearance defies a decree that he be put to death.Ten years and two months ago, Iran's Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini informed all Muslims of the world that Rushdie "and all those involved in ['The Satanic Verses,' his fourth novel's]
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | April 4, 1999
"The Ground Beneath Her Feet," by Salman Rushdie. Henry Holt. 578 pages. $27.50.It's the best thing ever written about rock and roll. It is rock and roll. Most of such writing is dumb or preening or just doesn't get it. The trouble with rock and roll is the words (half of them never get heard) and the music (very simple and so loud you can hardly hear it). So what is it? Why is it important? Because it's force. It's animal, human, spiritual power! It's exclamation, not explanation. It's experience, not explication.
FEATURES
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 24, 1997
LONDON -- British literary brawls don't get much better than this: John le Carre vs. Salman Rushdie.The heavyweight novelists have been going pen to pen for days in the pages of the Guardian newspaper over freedom of speech.Le Carre fired off a verbal jab: "Rushdie's way with the truth is as self-serving as ever."Rushdie unloaded a hook: "If he ever wants to win an argument, John le Carre could begin by learning to read."After five rounds of increasingly bitter letters to the editor last week, the Guardian finally dubbed the dustup, "The Satanic correspondence."
NEWS
December 13, 1993
In assessing President Clinton's meeting with the author Salman Rushdie, two points have to be kept very clear and separate: Everything the United States stands for must repudiate the right of the dictators of Iran to commission the murder of an Indian-born British subject who blasphemed Islam. But this is not endorsement of Mr. Rushdie's novel, "The Satanic Verses," which every reader is entitled to interpret individually, if able and willing to slog through it.In writing this large and convoluted tale, Mr. Rushdie was liberating himself from an Islamic heritage with the help of his English education, and also intending to shock.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | December 2, 1993
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton hardly qualifies as a tough voice from the White House bully pulpit by insisting that he "meant no disrespect" to the Islamic faith in meeting briefly with British author Salman Rushdie, still under a death warrant by the religious leadership of Iran.Clinton's further explanation that the meeting was arranged by aides "so I could see him and shake hands with him" and that they "visited probably for a couple of minutes" did not have the ring of a Teddy Roosevelt pounding the pulpit and resoundingly defending the right of Rushdie -- and all writers -- to publish without fear of physical harm from state terrorism.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 31, 1997
Salman Rushdie, the author of "The Satanic Verses," who has lived in hiding for nearly a decade as the object of an open-ended Islamic death sentence, was married in secret on Thursday in the Hamptons on Long Island.The details of the wedding were not given, but Andrew Wylie, Rushdie's agent, said yesterday, "Elizabeth and Salman Rushdie are happy to confirm that they were married on Thursday, Aug. 28, in a small ceremony."Newspaper reporters in London, speaking on the condition of anonymity, said the new Mrs. Rushdie, whose maiden name is being withheld to protect her safety, is a poet who had collaborated with Rushdie on an anthology of modern Indian writing.
NEWS
By MICHAEL PAKENHAM | January 28, 1996
Two weeks ago here, and elsewhere in The Sun, I have written about Salman Rushdie and his latest novel, "The Moor's Last Sigh." I am driven to scribble a bit more today by reasons quite personal.Reading Mr. Rushdie's new book and darting back into some of his earlier work, then taking that all into an intense conversation with him gave to me a renewed sense of the vitality of disciplined distance, a quality that is easy to gloss into triviality.The mortal enemy and principal alternative to distance, of course, is self-indulgence.
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