Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSaliva
IN THE NEWS

Saliva

FEATURED ARTICLES
HEALTH
By Dr. Thomas E. Finucane | October 2, 1990
A reader recently asked about her 72-year-old mother, who complains of secreting a lot of saliva when she has a cold or viral infection.The mother has to keep swallowing constantly to prevent drooling. The reader wanted to know whether this was caused by something specific and if it is a symptom of something that is treatable. She noted that her mother's doctor said it was nothing special and ignored it.In normal circumstances, we produce saliva most of the time. Production can be increased by smelling, seeing or, if we're hungry enough, thinking about food.
ARTICLES BY DATE
FEATURES
By Jennifer Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun Media Group | May 15, 2013
Last week's buzz about the potential health benefits of spit-shining your baby's pacifier got me thinking about how much conflicting advice there is out there in the world of raising children. While it stands to reason that exposure to a moderate amount of germs might boost immunity and prepare baby for life in the real world outside the sterile nursery, I seem to remember also recently hearing about how swapping saliva with a baby (via spit-shining, sharing a spoon, straw or food, etc…)
Advertisement
NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,Staff Writer | January 31, 1993
All Bill Vosburgh had to go on was a small amount of saliva the killer left on the rim of a soda bottle."There was really no physical evidence to speak of," said Mr. Vosburgh, a chemist in the Anne Arundel County police crime lab. "But the Coke bottle was on the table, and the children said their mother never drank [Coca-Cola]. It was just kept in the house for guests."A few months later, that saliva left on the bottle, combined with a relatively new DNA test called Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR)
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | May 23, 2012
No one likes to get stuck with a needle. But it's the only way doctors can get blood to test for diabetes, anemia and numerous other health problems. Scientists at the Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing say there is a much less invasive and painless means of detecting illnesses in patients — spit. Like blood, spit contains proteins, hormones, enzymes and DNA that can be used to test for and combat disease. It is easy and inexpensive to collect and analyze, making it ideal for research.
NEWS
By Mary Beth Regan | September 23, 2005
A Miami company has introduced a new over-the-counter kit to monitor a woman's ovulation cycle, essential to planning or avoiding pregnancy. The catch: Unlike popular kits that use urine to detect a woman's monthly hormone levels, the OvaTel (ovatel.com) is a saliva-based test. A woman uses a small, portable microscope to determine whether her saliva has higher salt levels than normal - an indication of ovulation. Fertility Tech Inc., selling the OvaTel for $21.95, says it is the first nonbattery-operated saliva-based test.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun; King Features Syndicate | June 15, 2003
Do you have any inexpensive suggestions for treating heartburn? My son suffers from reflux, especially after eating. He has no insurance, so he cannot afford drugs like Nexium or Prevacid. His doctor says that it's not a heart problem or anything serious, but it causes him discomfort. Researchers have known for almost 30 years that stimulating saliva production by chewing gum or sucking on a lozenge can relieve heartburn. Saliva rinses the esophagus and buffers acid that has splashed out of the stomach.
NEWS
By Chris Emery and Chris Emery,sun reporter | February 5, 2007
Janet Dodd was impressed yesterday with the elegant decor of the National Museum of Dentistry. Then she found the saliva room. On a pedestal in the center of the room stood a beaker filled with a murky gel. It was meant to simulate the 600 milliliters of saliva a person produces in a single day - enough to fill a soda bottle from a vending machine. Dodd winced in disgust at the sight of the beaker's contents. "I have no interest in this," she said, exiting the room quickly. The display is part of an exhibit titled Saliva: A Remarkable Fluid.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun Staff | February 18, 2005
Public health laws ban it on sidewalks, and teething babies can't seem to turn it off. But medical science has fallen head-over-heels for spit. Spit, spittle or saliva -- the watery, slippery liquid produced by glands tucked in our cheeks and under our tongues -- is chock-full of hormones, salts, proteins, bits of genetic code and other "bio-markers." Scientists say these things hold buckets of information about the state of our health. And thanks to recent gains in technology, researchers are now devising more sensitive tests to detect all manner of diseases -- such as HIV, Alzheimer's disease, rheumatoid arthritis, osteoporosis and cancer -- all from samples of humble spit.
NEWS
By Judy Foreman | June 3, 2005
Within two years, you may be able to go for a regular dental visit, spit into a cup and before your appointment is over, find out from an analysis of your saliva whether you're at risk for oral cancer. Currently, dentists have to do a thorough mouth exam to probe for oral cancer, which will strike more than 28,000 Americans a year and kill more than 7,000. Within a few more years, a fancier spit test may determine whether you're at risk for a number of other diseases as well, including breast cancer, Type 2 diabetes, ovarian cancer, Alzheimer's disease and rheumatoid arthritis.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | March 30, 1998
Someday, getting screened for cancers of the mouth and throat could start with spitting into a cup.Researchers with the Johns Hopkins Oncology Center reported progress yesterday toward a simple and inexpensive test that would find genetic evidence of these cancers in saliva. The evidence would come from cells that slough off from tumors, including those too small to produce symptoms or detect through conventional means.Dr. David Sidransky, a Hopkins cancer researcher, said the screening method would be of particular value to people who smoke, chew tobacco or drink alcohol -- habits that account for almost all of the 40,000 cancers of the mouth and throat that occur each year in the United States.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby | February 21, 2008
Sometimes called the "kissing disease" because it is most frequently spread through saliva, mononucleosis often is considered a teen illness. In fact, almost every adult (if tested) will show signs of having been infected by this virus, says Ben Hand, a primary-care physician in the department of medicine at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. Just about everyone has heard of "mono." What causes this disease? Mononucleosis or infectious mononucleosis is characterized by fever, sore throat or swollen lymph nodes, and it is caused by the Epstein-Barr virus, which is in the herpes family.
FEATURES
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun Reporter | January 17, 2008
Joe Moffett wishes the spit test was available four years ago, before the tumor near the base of his tongue put him through months of radiation treatments, chemotherapy and surgery -- plus the hassle of taking nourishment through a feeding tube inserted at Johns Hopkins Hospital. "Having a test out there, I could have avoided a whole lot. But still, I thank the good Lord I'm alive, and I'm excited about this test. It could help a lot of people," said Moffett, 69, a retired Army pilot from Dillon, S.C. Researchers at Hopkins published findings this month showing they are close to developing a mouth rinse that can detect head and neck cancer such as Moffett's.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby | November 1, 2007
An increasing number of studies indicate that periodontal health - that of the gums and the bones and ligaments that support the teeth - is related to the body's overall well- being, including cardiovascular health. Some studies also have shown a relationship between a pregnant woman's periodontal health and premature birth. Although no one is claiming that there is a causal relationship between poor periodontal health and other systemic diseases, there is a great deal of research aimed at further defining these associations, says Harlan Shiau, assistant professor of periodontics at the University of Maryland Dental School.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2007
Switchfoot -- Rams Head Live / Since the release of its 2003 double-platinum hit The Beautiful Letdown, Switchfoot has been steadily proving itself. Drawing inspiration from talents such as U2, Michael Jackson, the Beatles and Miles Davis, the band prides itself on diversity and instrumental experimentation. The group performs with the Florida band Copeland at 7 p.m. Sunday at Rams Head Live, 20 Market Place, Baltimore. Tickets are $22.50 -$25. Call 410-244-1131 or go to ramsheadlive.com.
NEWS
By Chris Emery and Chris Emery,sun reporter | February 5, 2007
Janet Dodd was impressed yesterday with the elegant decor of the National Museum of Dentistry. Then she found the saliva room. On a pedestal in the center of the room stood a beaker filled with a murky gel. It was meant to simulate the 600 milliliters of saliva a person produces in a single day - enough to fill a soda bottle from a vending machine. Dodd winced in disgust at the sight of the beaker's contents. "I have no interest in this," she said, exiting the room quickly. The display is part of an exhibit titled Saliva: A Remarkable Fluid.
NEWS
By COLBY WARE and COLBY WARE,SUN STAFF | August 20, 2006
When I received this assignment - following thoroughbred racehorses and their trainers through an arduous road trip - the editor warned, "It's going to be a long day." "Where am I headed?" I asked. He replied, "We'll start at Pimlico, stop at Laurel and then down to Virginia, Colonial Downs." My next question was, "Do I have to ride with the horses?" The editor chuckled, confidently declared "no" and explained that I'd be riding in the van with trainers. And then he cautioned again, "It'll be a really long day."
NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,Staff Writer | January 31, 1993
All Bill Vosburgh had to go on was a small amount of saliva the killer left on the rim of a soda bottle."There was really no physical evidence to speak of," said Mr. Vosburgh, a chemist in the Anne Arundel County police crime lab. "But the Coke bottle was on the table, and the children said their mother never drank [Coca-Cola]. It was just kept in the house for guests."A few months later, that saliva left on the bottle, combined with a relatively new DNA test called Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR)
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | February 17, 1999
A defense team that includes a DNA expert from O. J. Simpson's "dream team" is working out an arrangement with Anne Arundel County prosecutors to retest saliva from a 1992 murder.Last week, Circuit Judge Michael E. Loney erased the murder conviction and ordered a new trial for handyman Albert Givens, who is serving life without parole, in the bludgeoning and fatal stabbing of Marlene Kilpatrick of Arnold.Loney skewered Givens' defense counsel, writing that defense errors were so crucial and baffling that they resulted in Givens' unfair conviction.
NEWS
By JUDY FOREMAN | July 21, 2006
Is chewing gum good for you? The sugarless kind is, at least as far as your teeth are concerned. Chewing gum, either sugar-free or sugary, "causes us to salivate, and saliva has tremendously beneficial effects," said Dr. Matthew Messina a dentist in Cleveland who is a consumer adviser for the American Dental Association. Saliva "is a buffering solution. It washes the teeth." Sugary chewing gum is not a good idea, though. Sugar causes bacteria in the mouth to secrete acid, which dissolves tooth enamel, causing cavities.
NEWS
By Mary Beth Regan | September 23, 2005
A Miami company has introduced a new over-the-counter kit to monitor a woman's ovulation cycle, essential to planning or avoiding pregnancy. The catch: Unlike popular kits that use urine to detect a woman's monthly hormone levels, the OvaTel (ovatel.com) is a saliva-based test. A woman uses a small, portable microscope to determine whether her saliva has higher salt levels than normal - an indication of ovulation. Fertility Tech Inc., selling the OvaTel for $21.95, says it is the first nonbattery-operated saliva-based test.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.