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By DAN BERGER | November 22, 1993
Don't look now, but Ukraine is thoroughly Communist and the world's third greatest nuclear power.The NAFTA vote may not do much for Bill but it sure saved Carlos Salinas de Gortari's reputation.This could be the season that Bawlmerons catch on that Towson State has a basketball team.
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NEWS
By SAM QUINONES and SAM QUINONES,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 7, 1999
MEXICO CITY -- One way or another, Carlos Salinas de Gortari was always good for business.As president of Mexico, he was lauded worldwide as the promoter of free trade, the craftsman of Mexican economic openness, a Gorbachev-style reformist south of the border.Then came four years of recession, plummeting buying power -- and a national fit of anger toward Salinas that has inspired a booming cottage industry in T-shirts, comic books, rubber masks, candy, figurines and a host of other baubles of popular culture vilifying Mexico's most hated former president.
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NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | March 22, 1995
MEXICO CITY -- The man who fired the shot that assassinated the No. 2 official in Mexico's ruling party has been found guilty of murder, along with seven co-conspirators, and sentenced to 50 years in prison, officials confirmed yesterday.The eight convictions in the killing of Francisco Ruiz Massieu support the existence of a plot that prosecutors say stretches all the way to the elder brother of former President Carlos Salinas de Gortari.Coming less than six months after Mr. Ruiz Massieu was gunned down outside a downtown hotel, the convictions raise serious questions about the lack of progress in two earlier high-profile murders, those of ruling party presidential candidate Luis Donaldo Colosio and Cardinal Juan Jesus Posados Ocampo.
NEWS
By Steve Fairnaur and Steve Fairnaur,BOSTON GLOBE | February 15, 1997
MEXICO CITY -- For 15 years, Francisca Zetina Chavez was the most powerful witch in her neighborhood. She claimed numerous political contacts, both alive and dead, and when clients came to her for 200-peso "cleansings," she told them that it was her spiritual guide, John F. Kennedy, who would enter their bodies.Thanks to the government, she is now famous throughout Mexico.Known as La Paca, the 55-year-old mystic has been jailed as a central character in a scandal that has transfixed the nation and made a mockery of its criminal justice system, with disclosures of planted corpses, fugitive prosecutors and a tangled relationship between witch and state.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 27, 1996
CUAJIMALPA, Mexico -- More than two weeks have passed since investigators unearthed a decomposed body on a horse ranch where Raul Salinas de Gortari, the elder brother of the former president, used to jump his thoroughbreds. But they have made no progress in learning who the dead man is or how the body arrived at the site.When Attorney General Antonio Lozano Gracia announced the discovery Oct. 9, he said he was confident that the body would be the "conclusive" evidence to show that Raul Salinas had ordered the assassination in 1994 of a prominent politician, Jose Francisco Ruiz Massieu.
NEWS
March 3, 1995
Mexico is careening toward a purging and purification of its body politic. The process creates fear and excitement. Good news and bad tumble atop each other. Confidence in the peso and the political system plummet while faith in President Ernesto Zedillo soars.The Zedillo administration shattered the code of silence. Mexicans call this code by a Sicilian word with Mafia connotations, "omerta." It holds that a president whose family gets filthy rich during his single six-year term is never touched by investigation or criticism afterward, the immunity extending to associates; in turn, the past president never criticizes or inconveniences his successor.
NEWS
By John M. McClintock and John M. McClintock,Mexico City Bureau of The Sun | July 16, 1991
MEXICO CITY -- A prominent Mexican academic and anti-government newspaper columnist was kidnapped and threatened with death unless he ceased criticizing President Carlos Salinas de Gortari, his associates disclosed last night.Rene Chemoux, a columnist for the Mexico City newspaper Excelsior, was kidnapped last Wednesday night by six armed men after leaving a meeting of the National Accord for Democracy, a multiparty group seeking fairness in the August congressional elections. Mr. Chemoux is a member of the group.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 4, 1995
MEXICO CITY -- The political drama that has gripped Mexico since the arrest of a brother of former President Carlos Salinas de Gortari veered toward farce yesterday as Mr. Salinas went on a hunger strike to rescue his "honor" and then suspended it hours later.Mr. Salinas, who left office three months ago as one of the most powerful Mexican leaders of the past century, told reporters who followed him to a poor neighborhood in the northern city of Monterrey that his protest had nothing to do with the arrest of his brother, Raul, on murder charges.
NEWS
By SAM QUINONES and SAM QUINONES,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 7, 1999
MEXICO CITY -- One way or another, Carlos Salinas de Gortari was always good for business.As president of Mexico, he was lauded worldwide as the promoter of free trade, the craftsman of Mexican economic openness, a Gorbachev-style reformist south of the border.Then came four years of recession, plummeting buying power -- and a national fit of anger toward Salinas that has inspired a booming cottage industry in T-shirts, comic books, rubber masks, candy, figurines and a host of other baubles of popular culture vilifying Mexico's most hated former president.
NEWS
November 22, 1993
The day after the U.S. House of Representatives approved the North American Free Trade Agreement, Mexico's President Carlos Salinas de Gortari won a second vindication of his radical reforms. In Seattle, Mexico was inducted into the club of trans-Pacific trading powers known as APEC. Smart thing, too. Part of the economic relation that North America has with the Pacific Rim is going to be Mexico's. Thanks to NAFTA.U.S. rejection would have been a humiliation for Mr. Salinas domestically, repudiating everything he has done in five years of governing Mexico.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 27, 1996
CUAJIMALPA, Mexico -- More than two weeks have passed since investigators unearthed a decomposed body on a horse ranch where Raul Salinas de Gortari, the elder brother of the former president, used to jump his thoroughbreds. But they have made no progress in learning who the dead man is or how the body arrived at the site.When Attorney General Antonio Lozano Gracia announced the discovery Oct. 9, he said he was confident that the body would be the "conclusive" evidence to show that Raul Salinas had ordered the assassination in 1994 of a prominent politician, Jose Francisco Ruiz Massieu.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | March 22, 1995
MEXICO CITY -- The man who fired the shot that assassinated the No. 2 official in Mexico's ruling party has been found guilty of murder, along with seven co-conspirators, and sentenced to 50 years in prison, officials confirmed yesterday.The eight convictions in the killing of Francisco Ruiz Massieu support the existence of a plot that prosecutors say stretches all the way to the elder brother of former President Carlos Salinas de Gortari.Coming less than six months after Mr. Ruiz Massieu was gunned down outside a downtown hotel, the convictions raise serious questions about the lack of progress in two earlier high-profile murders, those of ruling party presidential candidate Luis Donaldo Colosio and Cardinal Juan Jesus Posados Ocampo.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 4, 1995
MEXICO CITY -- The political drama that has gripped Mexico since the arrest of a brother of former President Carlos Salinas de Gortari veered toward farce yesterday as Mr. Salinas went on a hunger strike to rescue his "honor" and then suspended it hours later.Mr. Salinas, who left office three months ago as one of the most powerful Mexican leaders of the past century, told reporters who followed him to a poor neighborhood in the northern city of Monterrey that his protest had nothing to do with the arrest of his brother, Raul, on murder charges.
NEWS
March 3, 1995
Mexico is careening toward a purging and purification of its body politic. The process creates fear and excitement. Good news and bad tumble atop each other. Confidence in the peso and the political system plummet while faith in President Ernesto Zedillo soars.The Zedillo administration shattered the code of silence. Mexicans call this code by a Sicilian word with Mafia connotations, "omerta." It holds that a president whose family gets filthy rich during his single six-year term is never touched by investigation or criticism afterward, the immunity extending to associates; in turn, the past president never criticizes or inconveniences his successor.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | November 22, 1993
Don't look now, but Ukraine is thoroughly Communist and the world's third greatest nuclear power.The NAFTA vote may not do much for Bill but it sure saved Carlos Salinas de Gortari's reputation.This could be the season that Bawlmerons catch on that Towson State has a basketball team.
NEWS
November 22, 1993
The day after the U.S. House of Representatives approved the North American Free Trade Agreement, Mexico's President Carlos Salinas de Gortari won a second vindication of his radical reforms. In Seattle, Mexico was inducted into the club of trans-Pacific trading powers known as APEC. Smart thing, too. Part of the economic relation that North America has with the Pacific Rim is going to be Mexico's. Thanks to NAFTA.U.S. rejection would have been a humiliation for Mr. Salinas domestically, repudiating everything he has done in five years of governing Mexico.
NEWS
By Ginger Thompson and Ginger Thompson,Mexico City Bureau | November 18, 1993
MEXICO CITY -- Nervous up until the last vote was counted, Mexicans celebrated last night after the U.S. House of Representatives passed the North American Free Trade Agreement.At a news conference attended by the most important members of his Cabinet, President Carlos Salinas de Gortari said: "The treaty is a good instrument -- one more instrument of the extraordinary strength of Mexicans to build a better future, richer in opportunities and sovereignty."With a smile, the president added, "The result of today can be interpreted not only as the final step toward the approval of an agreement negotiated by the governments of three countries, but also as a rejection of protectionist visions, those that promote fear of competition and those that close the vision of the future."
NEWS
By John M. McClintock and John M. McClintock,Mexico City Bureau of The Sun | November 28, 1990
MONTERREY, Mexico -- The Bush administration yesterday announced a proposed $1.5 billion loan guarantee aimed at increasing Mexico's dwindling oil reserves.The announcement by Treasury Secretary Nicholas F. Brady capped a two-day meeting between Mr. Bush and President Carlos Salinas de Gortari.Both presidents saw no impediments to a proposed U.S.-Mexico free trade agreement that is expected to be negotiated after getting a congressional go-ahead in the spring.Mr. Salinas de Gortari has expressed fears that an agreement might be defeated in Congress as the United States heads into a recession.
NEWS
By Ginger Thompson and Ginger Thompson,Mexico City Bureau | November 18, 1993
MEXICO CITY -- Nervous up until the last vote was counted, Mexicans celebrated last night after the U.S. House of Representatives passed the North American Free Trade Agreement.At a news conference attended by the most important members of his Cabinet, President Carlos Salinas de Gortari said: "The treaty is a good instrument -- one more instrument of the extraordinary strength of Mexicans to build a better future, richer in opportunities and sovereignty."With a smile, the president added, "The result of today can be interpreted not only as the final step toward the approval of an agreement negotiated by the governments of three countries, but also as a rejection of protectionist visions, those that promote fear of competition and those that close the vision of the future."
NEWS
November 7, 1993
Mexican President Carlos Salinas de Gortari, probably the best friend the United States ever had south of the Rio Grande, is preparing his people for possible rejection of the North American Free Trade Agreement by a feckless U.S. Congress.Knowing full well that such a rebuff will only inflame traditional Mexican resentment toward the gringos, Mr. Salinas is asserting national pride while downgrading the importance of a treaty he had hoped would be capstone of his presidency."We have no desire to be like others," he acidly commented in his final state of the nation speech, "or to share their deficiencies."
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