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NEWS
By Ginger Thompson and Ginger Thompson,Mexico City Bureau of The Sun | March 30, 1994
MEXICO CITY -- Struggling to reassure foreign investors and lift the devastated morale of its ranks after the assassination of its presidential candidate, the ruling Institutional Revolutionary Party yesterday chose a bookish economist with little political experience as its new candidate for president.Ernesto Zedillo Ponce de Leon, 42, coordinated the campaign of Luis Donaldo Colosio, who was gunned down last week in Tijuana. Mr. Zedillo, with a Ph.D. in economics from Yale, is credited with creating a government fund that saved many Mexican companies from drowning in the foreign debt crisis of 1982.
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NEWS
By CRAIG GORDON AND TOM BRUNE and CRAIG GORDON AND TOM BRUNE,NEWSDAY | February 16, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Vice President Dick Cheney's public mea culpa yesterday did little to clear up significant questions surrounding the accidental shooting, including why the White House sat on the story for almost a full day and whether he received preferential treatment from local deputies. Here is a look at some of those questions: Why didn't the White House notify the public immediately Saturday night that the vice president accidentally shot a man? Cheney makes it clear that it was his decision to wait almost a day to go public.
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SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | June 3, 2002
The Single-A Delmarva Shorebirds will send three players to the 43rd South Atlantic League All-Star Game, to be played June 18 in Lakewood, N.J. One of them is starting pitcher Ben Knapp, a former second-round draft pick. Another is closer Rommie Lewis, a fourth-round choice. Then there's catcher Trey Salinas, fresh from the Alexandria Aces of the independent Texas-Louisiana League. He'll turn 27 this month and never has played above Single-A, making him an unlikely all-star. Talk about crashing a party.
NEWS
March 3, 2004
On March 1, 2004, KATHERINE (nee Porpora); beloved wife of the late Frank Salina; devoted mother of Angela Folio and her husband Leonard, Grace Myers and her husband Donald, Harry Salina and his wife Lois, Christine Byrd and her husband Ronald. Also survived by loving sisters, brothers, and sisters-in-law, 8 grandchildren, 17 great-grandchildren and 1 great-great grandson. Friends may call at the family owned Leonard J. Ruck, Inc., Funeral Home, 5305 Harford Road (at Echodale) on Wednesday from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 P.M. Mrs. Salina will lie in state at the Stella Maris Chapel on Thursday from 10:30 till 11 A.M., the funeral hour.
NEWS
By Stephanie Simon and Stephanie Simon,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 26, 1997
SALINAS, Calif. -- John Steinbeck knew this scrabbly little hometown of his didn't much like him. Matter of fact, folks here hated him.Hated his ugly stories. Hated his pitiful characters. He wrote of whores and tramps and drunks, and of those wrung-out crop pickers, those miserable migrants. Honored them, he did. Exalted them. And spat on the growers and shippers who built Salinas into something.The Salinas elite got back at him for his betrayal. They burned "The Grapes of Wrath" on Main Street.
NEWS
July 12, 1994
An Annapolis man was being held in the county jail yesterday, charged with robbery and resisting arrest.James A. Thomas, 24, of the 100 block Obery Court was arrested near his home about 5 a.m. FridayHe is charged with robbing Luis A. Salinas, 25, of the first block of Jefferson Place.Mr. Salinas told police that he was walking from his home to Anne Arundel Medical Center seeking treatment for a sore throat about 4:30 a.m. Friday when a woman and two men accosted him near Calvert and West streets and demanded a dollar.
NEWS
By CRAIG GORDON AND TOM BRUNE and CRAIG GORDON AND TOM BRUNE,NEWSDAY | February 16, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Vice President Dick Cheney's public mea culpa yesterday did little to clear up significant questions surrounding the accidental shooting, including why the White House sat on the story for almost a full day and whether he received preferential treatment from local deputies. Here is a look at some of those questions: Why didn't the White House notify the public immediately Saturday night that the vice president accidentally shot a man? Cheney makes it clear that it was his decision to wait almost a day to go public.
NEWS
November 28, 1990
Consider the timing of President Bush's just-concluded trip to Mexico and his coming journey to five Latin American nations: Both presidential forays in search of stronger economic ties within the hemisphere are a reminder to the rest of the world that the United States is not without a fallback position if the General Agreement on Tariff and Trade fails to liberalize world global commerce during its showdown session next week.In Mexico, Mr. Bush made a strong pitch for a bilateral free-trade agreement much like the pact the United States signed with Canada two years ago. His partner in this enterprise is Mexican ** President Carlos Salinas de Gortari, who has made daring changes to open up his country's closed and protected economy.
NEWS
June 17, 1994
Rejection of the Mexican government's peace plan by rebel forces in Chiapas provides a preview of one of the near certainties in the tumultuous national election campaign now unfolding south of the Rio Grande. The results of the Aug. 21 polling will be rejected, too, no matter how great a show of fraud-free voting is displayed by the government.At this stage of the campaign, after rebellion in Chiapas and the assassination of the initial candidate of the ruling Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI)
NEWS
By Michael Wilson | May 1, 1991
MORE IS at stake over a U.S.-Mexico free trade agreement than expanding American investment opportunities or keeping Mexican workers from slipping across the border.If Congress fails to extend "fast-track" authority next month to the Bush administration to negotiate an agreement, the trade talks will collapse. And so will the improving U.S.-Mexican relationship, so vital to Mexico's economic growth and America's influence in the hemisphere.Mexican President Carlos Salinas de Gortari has an enormous investment in extension of a fast track, which provides for a simple up-or-down, no-amendment vote in Congress on any international trade agreements signed by the president.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | June 3, 2002
The Single-A Delmarva Shorebirds will send three players to the 43rd South Atlantic League All-Star Game, to be played June 18 in Lakewood, N.J. One of them is starting pitcher Ben Knapp, a former second-round draft pick. Another is closer Rommie Lewis, a fourth-round choice. Then there's catcher Trey Salinas, fresh from the Alexandria Aces of the independent Texas-Louisiana League. He'll turn 27 this month and never has played above Single-A, making him an unlikely all-star. Talk about crashing a party.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | November 17, 1999
You don't get much more multicultural than a Chicano/Latino theater troupe portraying blacks, Cubans, Jews, Haitians and Anglos in a show about Miami.But politically correct as that might sound, the three men who make up this particular troupe, Culture Clash, pride themselves on their incorrectness. And indeed, there's probably something to offend just about everybody in "Radio Mambo," which is receiving a lively Washington premiere at Arena Stage.There are also, however, elements just about everybody will identify with or at least recognize, and that's one of the strengths of this 90-minute show, which tackles subjects ranging from the immigrant experience to racism and ecology.
NEWS
By SAM QUINONES and SAM QUINONES,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 7, 1999
MEXICO CITY -- One way or another, Carlos Salinas de Gortari was always good for business.As president of Mexico, he was lauded worldwide as the promoter of free trade, the craftsman of Mexican economic openness, a Gorbachev-style reformist south of the border.Then came four years of recession, plummeting buying power -- and a national fit of anger toward Salinas that has inspired a booming cottage industry in T-shirts, comic books, rubber masks, candy, figurines and a host of other baubles of popular culture vilifying Mexico's most hated former president.
NEWS
By Stephanie Simon and Stephanie Simon,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 26, 1997
SALINAS, Calif. -- John Steinbeck knew this scrabbly little hometown of his didn't much like him. Matter of fact, folks here hated him.Hated his ugly stories. Hated his pitiful characters. He wrote of whores and tramps and drunks, and of those wrung-out crop pickers, those miserable migrants. Honored them, he did. Exalted them. And spat on the growers and shippers who built Salinas into something.The Salinas elite got back at him for his betrayal. They burned "The Grapes of Wrath" on Main Street.
NEWS
December 7, 1995
ONE YEAR AFTER his triumphant departure from office turned into a nightmare of humiliation, former Mexican President Carlos Salinas has launched a campaign for vindication that has instantly increased his country's political turmoil. Murder and money, corruption and conspiracy, even a contest between rival economic theories -- all these figure into a Salinas offer to return from self-exile to face justice and, by implication, meet smear with smear, scandal with scandal.His threat, his open break with a predecessor, is a distinct departure from the closed-circle traditions by which his party has held power since 1929.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 13, 1995
MEXICO CITY -- With his elder brother jailed on murder charges and his once-celebrated reputation in tatters, former President Carlos Salinas de Gortari has left Mexico for virtual exile in the United States, senior government officials said yesterday.The officials said that Mr. Salinas, who ruled until Dec. 1, 1994, and was considered one of Mexico's strongest and most innovative leaders, was asked Tuesday to leave the country by an emissary of the man he chose to succeed him, President Ernesto Zedillo.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | November 17, 1999
You don't get much more multicultural than a Chicano/Latino theater troupe portraying blacks, Cubans, Jews, Haitians and Anglos in a show about Miami.But politically correct as that might sound, the three men who make up this particular troupe, Culture Clash, pride themselves on their incorrectness. And indeed, there's probably something to offend just about everybody in "Radio Mambo," which is receiving a lively Washington premiere at Arena Stage.There are also, however, elements just about everybody will identify with or at least recognize, and that's one of the strengths of this 90-minute show, which tackles subjects ranging from the immigrant experience to racism and ecology.
NEWS
March 3, 2004
On March 1, 2004, KATHERINE (nee Porpora); beloved wife of the late Frank Salina; devoted mother of Angela Folio and her husband Leonard, Grace Myers and her husband Donald, Harry Salina and his wife Lois, Christine Byrd and her husband Ronald. Also survived by loving sisters, brothers, and sisters-in-law, 8 grandchildren, 17 great-grandchildren and 1 great-great grandson. Friends may call at the family owned Leonard J. Ruck, Inc., Funeral Home, 5305 Harford Road (at Echodale) on Wednesday from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 P.M. Mrs. Salina will lie in state at the Stella Maris Chapel on Thursday from 10:30 till 11 A.M., the funeral hour.
NEWS
July 12, 1994
An Annapolis man was being held in the county jail yesterday, charged with robbery and resisting arrest.James A. Thomas, 24, of the 100 block Obery Court was arrested near his home about 5 a.m. FridayHe is charged with robbing Luis A. Salinas, 25, of the first block of Jefferson Place.Mr. Salinas told police that he was walking from his home to Anne Arundel Medical Center seeking treatment for a sore throat about 4:30 a.m. Friday when a woman and two men accosted him near Calvert and West streets and demanded a dollar.
NEWS
June 17, 1994
Rejection of the Mexican government's peace plan by rebel forces in Chiapas provides a preview of one of the near certainties in the tumultuous national election campaign now unfolding south of the Rio Grande. The results of the Aug. 21 polling will be rejected, too, no matter how great a show of fraud-free voting is displayed by the government.At this stage of the campaign, after rebellion in Chiapas and the assassination of the initial candidate of the ruling Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI)
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