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NEWS
By Jim Burger | December 20, 1993
THERE are parts of that night I can remember as if it were yesterday. Others are gone forever; I doubt that even hypnosis would be much help. But already I'm getting ahead of myself.In the winter of 1980, I was in my junior year at the Maryland Institute, College of Art, and the walls were closing in. An artschool education can do that. It teaches you to open your eyes and take a long look at things, then locks you in a studio. For me, at least, what I wanted to look at was far from the marble floors and brass rails and plaster casts and flaking paintings of school.
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NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2013
Charlie "Fruit Man" McLean has been "a-rabbing" in Baltimore for more than 40 years, and he still can't think of a better way to spend his time. As a boy, he rode with the men who sold fresh produce in the streets from their brightly colored horse-drawn wagons. He made the job his life's work. Even now, he says, he can get fresh food to people who might otherwise never see it. McLean, 53, is one of only about 10 people still "a-rabbing," as Baltimoreans have long called his line of work.
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FEATURES
By Neal Lipschutz | January 15, 1995
Earl Shorris has led an unusual double life -- writer and salesman. A writer of books and contributing editor to Harper's magazine, he also spent a career as an advertising man and consultant to large corporations. In this pessimistic look at a world where he thinks selling in all its forms has run amok, Mr. Shorris clearly has turned against his business side.The author argues that the act of selling, morally neutral and crucial to the functioning of economic and cultural systems throughout history, has wildly overstepped its bounds to become the dominant force in America's business and social life.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow | December 26, 2008
Role Models ** 1/2 ( 2 1/2 STARS) It's no great shakes, but this tale of two energy-drink salesmen (played by Paul Rudd and Seann William Scott) who become mentors in the Sturdy Wings program for maladjusted kids allows its talented cast (including Jane Lynch, Christopher Mintz-Plasse and Bobb'e J. Thompson) plenty of pungent moments before it dissolves into a sea of goo. Rudd, in particular, gets a chance to display the self-deprecating charm he previously exploited to the hilt in the straight-to-video I Could Never Be Your Woman, co-starring Michelle Pfeiffer.
NEWS
By Ed Heard and Ed Heard,SUN STAFF | November 2, 1995
Howard County police charged two men with robbery Tuesday afternoon after two street salesmen were lured to a street near the Long Reach Village Center in Columbia and robbed.According to police, about 1 p.m. Tuesday two men posing as customers approached two men selling speakers in the 6000 block of Foreland Garth in Columbia's Long Reach village and convinced the salesmen to follow them in another vehicle to nearby Flowerstock Row.Once there, the men took the speakers from the salesmen.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,Sun Staff Writer | March 21, 1995
It was the closest thing car salesmen have to group therapy."You are not bad people," motivational speaker Timothy C. Gercke told the 29 car salesmen who filled a conference room at an Annapolis hotel yesterday. "You're going to make a difference."The salesmen came for this day of insider tips, business briefings and ethics lessons designed to create a more sensitive car salesman and to help change what they say is an undeserved image as fast talkers and scam artists. The meeting at the Wyndham Garden Hotel was part of a course sponsored by the National Automobile Dealers Association.
FEATURES
By Orlando Sentinel | November 26, 1992
The real-estate salesmen of David Mamet's "Glengarry Glen Ross" spew venom the way a volcano spits out molten rock, and the foul discharge overruns everyone in sight.Audiences have been stunned by the noxious language and the unsavory methods of Mr. Mamet's land-peddlers, who turned up first in his award-winning 1983 play and more recently in the film version, which opened nationwide in October.Yet a stench has surrounded salesmen in America's popular culture almost as long as that culture has existed.
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | February 6, 1999
Wheat First Union is reportedly trying to lure as many as seven BT Alex. Brown Inc. employees from its Institutional Sales division to build its own operations in Baltimore, according to sources familiar with the situation.The Richmond-based brokerage and investment banking firm has made offers to a group of "institutional salesmen," but Alex. Brown officials have countered to prevent them from leaving, sources said.Institutional salesmen are key players within investment banking companies, because they sell research material generated by the firm to brokerages, mutual funds and pension funds.
BUSINESS
By Linda Garman-Weimer and Linda Garman-Weimer,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 13, 2004
When Loretta Stachowski noticed her Canton rowhouse's Formstone facade had cracked and faded, she envisioned a colorful future for the cement house covering that became a part of Baltimore's residential architecture during the 1940s. So a few years ago, Stachowski and her husband, Richard, decided to have the Formstone painted. It was a less expensive choice than the more trendy effort to remove the faux stones that hide many of the brick facades in Baltimore. And Stachowski liked being part of something new. "It's brighter, it's cleaner, and it's different," said Loretta Stachowski, 64, whose South Ellwood Avenue home is done in an ivory and brick-red scheme with black shutters and window planters.
FEATURES
By Lita Solis-Cohen and Lita Solis-Cohen,Solis-Cohen Enterprises | October 4, 1992
Want to get your foot in the door on a collecting field with small following?Close a deal on what must have been Willy Loman's favorite collectibles, salesmen's samples, and you'll be the first on your block to own a rare piece of Americana. These Lilliputian scale models of products traveling salesmen hawked from door to door, farm to farm, and store to store reveal and preserve the amazing craftsmanship, ingenuity, and pride of manufacturing during the late 19th and early 20th centuries, an era before advertising agencies, TV commercials and shopping malls.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey and Andrew Leckey,Tribune Media Services | July 8, 2007
Mom and apple pie may be next. How can anything as basic to American life as a home mortgage turn out to be a heavy burden on the investment world and perhaps the entire economy? The answer is it seemed such a tried-and-true concept that it fell victim to the same unbridled optimism that fueled the 1990s technology boom: Invest in a sure thing before it is too late and don't sweat the details. "I'm telling you, it can't miss," a taxi driver in Northern Virginia said a couple of years ago, as he told me about the development where he'd bought a condominium under construction.
NEWS
By M. WILLIAM SALGANIK, JAMIE SMITH HOPKINS, JONATHAN D. ROCKOFF and M. WILLIAM SALGANIK, JAMIE SMITH HOPKINS, JONATHAN D. ROCKOFF,SUN REPORTERS | July 29, 2006
At Casa Mia's restaurant near White Marsh, 10 cooks begin constructing sandwiches, forming crab cakes and layering lasagna in foil trays each weekday morning at 6. Working on folding buffet tables, the crew pours condiments into little plastic containers, packs sodas and ice into coolers and swathes trays of hot foods in thermal wraps. At 10:30, eight to 10 drivers start loading the catering orders into their cars. Their destination: medical offices and hospitals from Elkton to Annapolis.
BUSINESS
By Linda Garman-Weimer and Linda Garman-Weimer,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 13, 2004
When Loretta Stachowski noticed her Canton rowhouse's Formstone facade had cracked and faded, she envisioned a colorful future for the cement house covering that became a part of Baltimore's residential architecture during the 1940s. So a few years ago, Stachowski and her husband, Richard, decided to have the Formstone painted. It was a less expensive choice than the more trendy effort to remove the faux stones that hide many of the brick facades in Baltimore. And Stachowski liked being part of something new. "It's brighter, it's cleaner, and it's different," said Loretta Stachowski, 64, whose South Ellwood Avenue home is done in an ivory and brick-red scheme with black shutters and window planters.
NEWS
August 15, 2003
Pasadena woman robbed at home early yesterday A Pasadena woman was robbed in her home yesterday morning by two men who entered through an unlocked door, Anne Arundel County police said. The men took an undisclosed amount of cash from the home in the 1500 block of Fairview Beach Road but did not harm the woman, according to police. Police set up a roadblock on Fort Smallwood Road and were screening vehicles shortly after the incident occurred at 7:30 a.m. The suspects were described as a black man and a white man, both about 6 feet tall, 200 pounds, and wearing white T-shirts.
NEWS
By Tom Siebert | December 20, 2001
MELDING PATRIOTISM and advertising may not be inherently bad. But there sure have been a lot of recent commercials that have tried it and shown the industry at its absolute worst. What great timing, too. A recent Gallup Poll put advertising professionals one rung up from the bottom, in front of car salesmen, when Americans were asked about "honesty and integrity" in various occupations. Should the trend of patriotic advertising continue, car salesmen have a shot at getting out of the cellar in 2002.
BUSINESS
February 21, 2000
New positions Engelau is general manager of Southern Maryland Oil Southern Maryland Oil named Roger Engelau vice president and general manager of the La Plata-based subsidiary of the Wills Group Inc. Formerly with the Clorox Corp., he is a resident of Calvert County and is a U.S. Military Academy graduate. Engelau joined the company in 1992 as general sales manager. Computer I/0 names Sallam VP, chief technology officer Computer I/O Corp., based in Laurel, appointed Hussein Sallam as chief technology officer and vice president of engineering.
NEWS
By Diane Mullaly from the files of the Howard County Historical Society's library | September 29, 1996
25 years ago (week of Sept. 26-Oct. 2, 1971):The Columbia Association reported a budget deficit of about $85,000, attributable to the under-utilization of some of the town's recreational facilities. The biggest culprit appeared to be the health club in the Village of Harper's Choice, which was operating about $43,000 over budget.50 years ago (week of Sept. 22-28, 1946):Police warned residents to beware of two "phony" linoleum salesmen plying their trade in the county.Pub Date: 9/29/96
BUSINESS
February 21, 2000
New positions Engelau is general manager of Southern Maryland Oil Southern Maryland Oil named Roger Engelau vice president and general manager of the La Plata-based subsidiary of the Wills Group Inc. Formerly with the Clorox Corp., he is a resident of Calvert County and is a U.S. Military Academy graduate. Engelau joined the company in 1992 as general sales manager. Computer I/0 names Sallam VP, chief technology officer Computer I/O Corp., based in Laurel, appointed Hussein Sallam as chief technology officer and vice president of engineering.
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal | January 27, 2000
ATLANTA -- Another day, another Super Bowl sales pitch, another high-powered Internet merger. Quick, name the reason that John Elway, Michael Jordan and Wayne Gretzky came together yesterday for perhaps the most star-studded news conference in sports history. Hint: It wasn't to teach the world to sing in perfect harmony. Then again, their goal was no more transparent than Coca-Cola's back in the prehistoric days when TV commercials were the preferred way to reach consumers. The Three Entrepreneurs, portraying themselves as the Three Musketeers, want you to visit their Web site -- the appropriately monikered mvp.com.
BUSINESS
By Kenneth R. Harney | October 31, 1999
WHEN YOU apply for a home mortgage, you sometimes have to disclose so much personal information that you feel financially strip-searched.But who gets access to all that private data -- your income, assets, federal and state tax details, bank account numbers and credit-card balances? Is it the telemarketers who pick dinner time to pitch their wares? Is it the mass marketers who stuff your mailbox with home-equity and credit-card deals you don't need?Does your most intimate personal financial profile become part of an electronic dossier on you available online as a public commodity to anyone who'll pay for it?
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