Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSales Tax
IN THE NEWS

Sales Tax

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK and JAY HANCOCK,jay.hancock@baltsun.com | September 3, 2008
State bean counters blame the crash in sales-tax collections on high gas prices and a weak economy. I bet there's something else going on. In January, Maryland's sales-tax rate rose by a fifth. To 6 percent. If you don't think that's compelling more people to avoid the tax by shopping on the Web or driving to "tax-free" Delaware, keep reading. Given Maryland's budget hole, raising the sales tax from 5 percent to 6 percent was probably necessary. But as much as small states such as Maryland like to steer their own destinies, forces from across the border often cause detours.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
Lorraine Mirabella and The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2014
Maryland consumers who shop online at Amazon.com after Tuesday will be paying more — 6 percent of the sale. Yet most shoppers will click "place your order" anyway. The world's largest online retailer will begin collecting Maryland's sales tax as it prepares to start operations of a massive new distribution center next spring in Southeast Baltimore, where it expects to hire more than 1,000 workers. It has already hired part-time and seasonal workers to staff a smaller "sortation" center nearby that will open this fall.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
By Sean Somerville and Sean Somerville,SUN STAFF | April 12, 1997
Four days after a Maryland General Assembly session that produced a first-ever income-tax cut, House Speaker Casper R. Taylor Jr. yesterday renewed his call for a thorough examination of the state's entire tax structure.Addressing a conference in Baltimore, the Cumberland Democrat said the state's income-tax burden is the fourth-highest nationwide. He said the corporate tax burden is the fifth-lowest and the sales-tax burden is the sixth-lowest."That suggests to me it needs some rebalancing," said Taylor, a potential rival of Gov. Parris N. Glendening.
NEWS
By Robin Jacobs | July 9, 2014
Baltimore City auctioned off more than $20 million worth of tax, water and other liens this spring in an online auction. These liens are tied to almost 7,000 properties, assessed at a total of more than $720 million. But while the tax sale system provides local government with badly-needed funds up front, it short-changes our communities. The complexities of the tax sale system mean that only those with sophistication and wealth can bid (this year's top four bidders in Baltimore City bought nearly 60 percent of the certificates)
NEWS
January 13, 1999
IN A TIME of plenty, it's ironic that Maryland's governor and legislators are talking about raising taxes. Yet there is a pressing need to spend more in a key area: transportation.While Maryland's general revenue funds are flush -- mainly from fast-rising income-tax and sales-tax receipts -- the flow of gas-tax money into the transportation trust fund hasn't kept pace with road and mass-transit demands.Unless something is done quickly, Maryland won't have cash for light rail and highways and to replace the crumbling Woodrow Wilson Bridge.
BUSINESS
Lorraine Mirabella and The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2014
Maryland consumers who shop online at Amazon.com after Tuesday will be paying more — 6 percent of the sale. Yet most shoppers will click "place your order" anyway. The world's largest online retailer will begin collecting Maryland's sales tax as it prepares to start operations of a massive new distribution center next spring in Southeast Baltimore, where it expects to hire more than 1,000 workers. It has already hired part-time and seasonal workers to staff a smaller "sortation" center nearby that will open this fall.
NEWS
June 18, 2014
Reporter Jamie Smith Hopkins ' article on economic growth in Maryland discussed what can be done when most of the Mid-Atlantic is caught in slow growth ("A bumpy year for Maryland's economy," June 15). The antidote for slow growth is visionary leadership - and a willingness to buck regional trends. In Maryland, the prevailing view that increasing economic activity is the political equivalent of fracking must be changed. More state revenue is not always the solution. In fact, expanding the sales tax holiday can create more job opportunities.
NEWS
November 18, 2012
As the owner of a flower shop in Aberdeen, I am very concerned with new legislation currently being considered in Congress: the "Marketplace Fairness Act" and the "Marketplace Equity Act," which will add sales tax to Internet sales. This will disproportionately impact small businesses like mine - creating a significant administrative and financial burden that will make it necessary for me to pass on additional costs to my customers. In today's economy, it is irresponsible to place additional burdens on small businesses, which are the engine of our economy.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2013
The Senate voted Monday to allow states to assess a sales tax on purchases from Amazon.com, eBay and other online retailers in a bipartisan measure that would also reduce the increase planned for Maryland's gas tax. The bill, which passed 69-27, would resolve a long-standing complaint of brick-and-mortar business owners, who say they struggle to compete with online companies that don't charge sales tax. The legislation requires Internet sellers to...
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2013
Medifast, a maker of weight-loss food products in Owings Mills, said it will begin collecting sales and use taxes on all Internet sales where applicable starting in September. The company said it was doing so as more state legislatures and revenue agencies seek to enforce sales tax on online purchases. The company expects that enforcement trend to continue. The company will assess the sales tax based on the shipping address provided by the customer. Consumers will see the sales tax charge at the online checkout.
NEWS
June 18, 2014
Reporter Jamie Smith Hopkins ' article on economic growth in Maryland discussed what can be done when most of the Mid-Atlantic is caught in slow growth ("A bumpy year for Maryland's economy," June 15). The antidote for slow growth is visionary leadership - and a willingness to buck regional trends. In Maryland, the prevailing view that increasing economic activity is the political equivalent of fracking must be changed. More state revenue is not always the solution. In fact, expanding the sales tax holiday can create more job opportunities.
NEWS
May 21, 2014
Congress needs to pass the Marketplace Fairness Act (MFA) so there is real and fair competition reflecting 21st century commerce. America was built on promoting economic growth and business in a fashion that ensures fair competition for all. Today, online-only retailers are not required to charge and collect sales tax, while local businesses must. However, the sales tax (in all but five states) is still owed. The collection of these taxes is difficult to enforce unless online sellers have either a physical store or a warehouse within the state.
NEWS
May 20, 2014
Concerning the recent discussion in The Sun about seniors leaving Maryland to live in retirement elsewhere ( "Why I love living in Maryland," May 18), I have noticed that some of my friends and acquaintances who are retired school teachers have moved to Delaware. They did not chose to retire to Delaware to be nearer family members, and they certainly not to move to a better climate. They made this decision due to the significantly lower tax rate. Delaware has no sales tax, and their income tax and property tax rates are about two-thirds Maryland's rate.
NEWS
May 12, 2014
With varying degrees of aggressiveness and specificity, all seven candidates for governor are pledging to change Maryland's tax code. The ideas range from eliminating the income tax altogether (Republicans David Craig and Charles Lollar) to raising taxes on millionaires and multi-state corporations to pay for cuts for small businesses and most individuals (Democrat Heather Mizeur). But for all the talk among the Republicans and at least one Democrat (Douglas F. Gansler) of the dozens of tax and fee hikes approved under Gov. Martin O'Malley, there has been little attention paid to the tax that has gone up the most during the past eight years: the sales tax. At Mr. O'Malley's urging, the General Assembly approved an increase in the sales tax from 5 percent to 6 percent during a special legislative session in 2007.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | March 12, 2014
Republican Harford County Executive David R. Craig said that if elected governor, he would roll back Maryland's strict gun-control laws and push a sales tax exemption for goods manufactured in the state. Craig identified at least six taxes he would like to reduce or repeal during an hourlong discussion Wednesday at a Baltimore Sun Newsmaker Forum, starting with his plan to eliminate the state income tax. Levies on estates, inheritances, stormwater runoff, septic systems and products manufactured in Maryland would be targeted for repeal later in his administration, he said in an interview afterward.
NEWS
January 16, 2014
Last week, the two top leaders of the Maryland General Assembly expressed interest in reducing the estate tax for the heirs of wealthier residents. It's an idea that's been trotted out before, usually by Republicans, and it seldom gets very far in Annapolis. But this year appears to be different. House Speaker Michael E. Busch and Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller have endorsed a plan to gradually increase how much of a deceased person's estate can be shielded from Maryland's estate tax from $1 million to $5.25 million.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose | July 26, 2011
My colleague Jill Rosen wrote this week that retailers are pushing back-to-school shopping in July, far earlier than usual. But if you want to save sales tax - or 6 percent on certain purchases - do your back-to-school or other shopping between August 14 and the 20 th .  Maryland sales tax won't be assessed on apparel and footwear that is $100 or less. Accessories will be taxed no matter what the price. Maryland's comptroller posts a list online of items eligible for the tax holiday.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | October 23, 2013
When Amazon.com opens a huge distribution center next year in Southeast Baltimore, consumers across the state who buy books, electronics, toys or anything else from the online seller will no longer be able to avoid the state's 6 percent sales tax. Consumers might not like it, but that's just fine with many retailers in Maryland, who say the online giant enjoyed that competitive advantage for too long. Seattle-based Amazon announced plans Tuesday to open a 1 million-square-foot warehouse that will employ 1,000 full-time workers at the site of the former General Motors plan on Broening Highway, a move welcomed by city and state officials.
NEWS
September 5, 2013
Only two words come to mind in response to the latest missive from the Greater Baltimore Committee wherein 52 CEOs say Maryland's highest priority for economic growth and job creation ought to be reforming the state's tax structure to make it more competitive: Good idea. That the region's business leaders think the state's tax structure is hurting the "business climate" is none too shocking. We have yet to visit the state where business leaders never grouse about taxes and the vicissitudes of government — state, federal and local.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.