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Sales Process

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BUSINESS
By Christi Harlan and Christi Harlan,Dow Jones News Service | March 16, 1991
DALLAS -- In an effort to spur real estate sales, the staff of the federal Resolution Trust Corp. is recommending that government-owned properties be valued on the basis of a single appraisal, instead of the current average of three appraisals per property.The recommendation, if accepted by the RTC oversight board, would eliminate part of the drawn-out sales process that has driven many buyers away from the RTC's $17 billion portfolio of properties. Those properties, the legacy of failed thrifts across the country, are costing the RTC about $1.5 billion a year to carry, according to RTC Deputy Director Lamar Kelly Jr.Current RTC policy calls for an appraisal of a property's value at the time it is made available for sale.
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BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2014
The Baltimore region had its best year for home sales since the start of the recession, as the local housing market continued its slow recovery in 2013. About 27,750 units closed in 2013, up roughly 14 percent from 2012, according to data provided by RealEstate Business Intelligence, a subsidiary of the online listing service MRIS. In 2007, about 31,300 units sold, down from nearly 38,000 in 2006. The median sale price also increased last year in Baltimore and its five surrounding counties, up an average of 4.3 percent over 2012, according to RBI. John Kantorski, a real estate agent for Cummings and Co. Realtors, said 2013 had been his best year to date.
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BUSINESS
November 19, 1995
Realtor Florence Jordan wins Lucky Bucks drawingRealtor Florence Jordan won her choice of $10,000 or a two-week trip for two to London, Paris or Rome by winning first place in a drawing last week designed to promote sales of homes listed with broker O'Conor, Piper & Flynn. Several thousand agents attended the Thursday drawing at Camden Yards, which was viewed through teleconferencing by Eastern Shore Realtors gathered at a Dewey Beach, Del., office. Ms. Jordan is an agent in OPF's Glen Burnie office.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | July 7, 2013
You might not have heard of Intelect Corp., but you can hear FM radio in Baltimore's Fort McHenry and Harbor tunnels thanks to the company's engineering. Rohit H. Patel started the Baltimore technology firm in 1995 after working for the Maryland Transit Administration, the state's Department of General Services and Westinghouse. Once headquartered in his bedroom, it's now a 68-person company that produced more than $24 million in revenue last year, up from $13 million the year before.
BUSINESS
By HANAH CHO and HANAH CHO,SUN REPORTER | February 17, 2006
Shares of Baltimore-based Educate Inc., the company known for its Sylvan tutoring centers, tumbled 25 percent yesterday after executives announced a series of management and other changes in response to a $4.7 million loss in the fourth quarter. Educate executives acknowledged yesterday that they failed to quickly respond to the changing behavior of their prospective customers, who increasingly are using the Internet to contact the company for kindergarten through 12th-grade tutoring services.
BUSINESS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | May 11, 1997
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. -- In sales, knowledge brings success, consultants say.A large mutual fund company had no trouble attracting potential customers. Customers would call in and ask for information on funds, but the inquiry didn't often result in a sale.So the company hired the "Sales Doctors."Donna and Arthur Siegel examine a company's sales process to turn around its ailing revenues.Through SeaBird Associates, their company in Boca Raton, Fla., SalesDoctors magazine and their Web site, the Siegels help companies untangle the mystery of what's depressing their sales.
NEWS
By Janet Gilbert and Special to The Baltimore Sun | November 29, 2009
I t's a real treat to sit down to a tree-ripened navel orange in November, so when our local high school's music foundation proposed a fruit sale fundraiser last year, I was completely in favor of it. The only part of the fundraiser that doesn't put a big, sunny Florida smile on my face is unloading the truck. There's something about the sight of pallet after pallet piled high with citrus fruit that makes you wish you were not such a highly effective salesperson. And we in the Janet's World School Fundraising Department are, indeed, superlative citrus sellers.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2014
The Baltimore region had its best year for home sales since the start of the recession, as the local housing market continued its slow recovery in 2013. About 27,750 units closed in 2013, up roughly 14 percent from 2012, according to data provided by RealEstate Business Intelligence, a subsidiary of the online listing service MRIS. In 2007, about 31,300 units sold, down from nearly 38,000 in 2006. The median sale price also increased last year in Baltimore and its five surrounding counties, up an average of 4.3 percent over 2012, according to RBI. John Kantorski, a real estate agent for Cummings and Co. Realtors, said 2013 had been his best year to date.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | July 7, 2013
You might not have heard of Intelect Corp., but you can hear FM radio in Baltimore's Fort McHenry and Harbor tunnels thanks to the company's engineering. Rohit H. Patel started the Baltimore technology firm in 1995 after working for the Maryland Transit Administration, the state's Department of General Services and Westinghouse. Once headquartered in his bedroom, it's now a 68-person company that produced more than $24 million in revenue last year, up from $13 million the year before.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2011
Nearly 1,500 workers are in danger of losing their jobs under a reorganization plan by the Superfresh supermarket chain that would sell almost all its stores in Maryland, most of which are in the Baltimore area. The workers will lose their jobs unless other supermarket chains buy the Superfresh locations and retain their employees. State regulators said Monday that the company filed notice about the layoffs and said that store closings could begin as soon as July 6. Superfresh has 24 stores in the state, and all but two locations — both in Ocean City — are for sale.
BUSINESS
Yvonne Wenger | May 4, 2012
Housing experts say homeowners can wait as long as nine months to get approval to sell their home as a short sale, and efforts are underway to push lenders to give a prompt answer. HouseLogic says homebuyers may find themselves in the position of having to send multiple requests to their lender to ask for approval for them to sell their house for less than they owe while a potential buyer waits in the wings. HouseLogic, a service offered by the National Association of Realtors, provides information on homeownership, such as taxes and insurance.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2011
Nearly 1,500 workers are in danger of losing their jobs under a reorganization plan by the Superfresh supermarket chain that would sell almost all its stores in Maryland, most of which are in the Baltimore area. The workers will lose their jobs unless other supermarket chains buy the Superfresh locations and retain their employees. State regulators said Monday that the company filed notice about the layoffs and said that store closings could begin as soon as July 6. Superfresh has 24 stores in the state, and all but two locations — both in Ocean City — are for sale.
NEWS
By Janet Gilbert and Special to The Baltimore Sun | November 29, 2009
I t's a real treat to sit down to a tree-ripened navel orange in November, so when our local high school's music foundation proposed a fruit sale fundraiser last year, I was completely in favor of it. The only part of the fundraiser that doesn't put a big, sunny Florida smile on my face is unloading the truck. There's something about the sight of pallet after pallet piled high with citrus fruit that makes you wish you were not such a highly effective salesperson. And we in the Janet's World School Fundraising Department are, indeed, superlative citrus sellers.
BUSINESS
By HANAH CHO and HANAH CHO,SUN REPORTER | February 17, 2006
Shares of Baltimore-based Educate Inc., the company known for its Sylvan tutoring centers, tumbled 25 percent yesterday after executives announced a series of management and other changes in response to a $4.7 million loss in the fourth quarter. Educate executives acknowledged yesterday that they failed to quickly respond to the changing behavior of their prospective customers, who increasingly are using the Internet to contact the company for kindergarten through 12th-grade tutoring services.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | August 13, 2002
HARRISBURG, Pa. - Hershey Foods Corp., the biggest U.S. maker of chocolate candy, should disclose in court details of its proposed sale process and all offers, Pennsylvania Attorney General Michael Fisher proposed yesterday. Fisher filed a petition with Dauphin County Orphans' Court, which oversees charitable trust decisions in the state, to try to discourage the sale of Hershey by the charitable trust that controls the company's voting shares. "Potential buyers must know they can't just strike a business deal for Hershey Foods," Fisher said in a statement.
BUSINESS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | May 11, 1997
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. -- In sales, knowledge brings success, consultants say.A large mutual fund company had no trouble attracting potential customers. Customers would call in and ask for information on funds, but the inquiry didn't often result in a sale.So the company hired the "Sales Doctors."Donna and Arthur Siegel examine a company's sales process to turn around its ailing revenues.Through SeaBird Associates, their company in Boca Raton, Fla., SalesDoctors magazine and their Web site, the Siegels help companies untangle the mystery of what's depressing their sales.
BUSINESS
Yvonne Wenger | May 4, 2012
Housing experts say homeowners can wait as long as nine months to get approval to sell their home as a short sale, and efforts are underway to push lenders to give a prompt answer. HouseLogic says homebuyers may find themselves in the position of having to send multiple requests to their lender to ask for approval for them to sell their house for less than they owe while a potential buyer waits in the wings. HouseLogic, a service offered by the National Association of Realtors, provides information on homeownership, such as taxes and insurance.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | August 13, 2002
HARRISBURG, Pa. - Hershey Foods Corp., the biggest U.S. maker of chocolate candy, should disclose in court details of its proposed sale process and all offers, Pennsylvania Attorney General Michael Fisher proposed yesterday. Fisher filed a petition with Dauphin County Orphans' Court, which oversees charitable trust decisions in the state, to try to discourage the sale of Hershey by the charitable trust that controls the company's voting shares. "Potential buyers must know they can't just strike a business deal for Hershey Foods," Fisher said in a statement.
BUSINESS
November 19, 1995
Realtor Florence Jordan wins Lucky Bucks drawingRealtor Florence Jordan won her choice of $10,000 or a two-week trip for two to London, Paris or Rome by winning first place in a drawing last week designed to promote sales of homes listed with broker O'Conor, Piper & Flynn. Several thousand agents attended the Thursday drawing at Camden Yards, which was viewed through teleconferencing by Eastern Shore Realtors gathered at a Dewey Beach, Del., office. Ms. Jordan is an agent in OPF's Glen Burnie office.
BUSINESS
By Christi Harlan and Christi Harlan,Dow Jones News Service | March 16, 1991
DALLAS -- In an effort to spur real estate sales, the staff of the federal Resolution Trust Corp. is recommending that government-owned properties be valued on the basis of a single appraisal, instead of the current average of three appraisals per property.The recommendation, if accepted by the RTC oversight board, would eliminate part of the drawn-out sales process that has driven many buyers away from the RTC's $17 billion portfolio of properties. Those properties, the legacy of failed thrifts across the country, are costing the RTC about $1.5 billion a year to carry, according to RTC Deputy Director Lamar Kelly Jr.Current RTC policy calls for an appraisal of a property's value at the time it is made available for sale.
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