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NEWS
May 7, 2004
SHARON SEGAL CUNNINGHAM SALEH, of Alpharetta, died May 6, 2004. Sharon is survived by her husband Jim Saleh, her daughters Ashley Cunningham and Emily Cunningham Hancock and her sisters Hannah Solkey and Roslyn Schmidt and her brother Michael Segal. Graveside Services will be held Friday, May 7, 2004 at 12:30 P.M. at Arlington Memorial Park in Sandy Spring. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to the Southeastern Brain Tumor Foundation, P.O. Box 422471, Atlanta, GA 30342.
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NEWS
By Ned Parker and Ali Hameed and Ned Parker and Ali Hameed,Los Angeles Times | January 3, 2009
BAGHDAD - The Sunni and Shiite tribesmen had come from across Iraq to turn the page on the fratricidal violence that tore the country apart in the years after the 2003 U.S.-led invasion. But as they met yesterday, an 18-year-old member of the tribe blew himself up, killing at least 23 people and providing a jarring reminder of the obstacles to reconciliation, even within one clan. Some members of the Qarqouly tribe had not seen each other for more than six years and had hoped to revive old ties after weathering the religious extremism and sectarian fighting that divided Iraq and destroyed families and friendships.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | July 24, 1993
NEW YORK -- An Egyptian welder suspected as a major conspirator in the foiled plot to bomb four targets in New York City was surprised at a barbecue in a New Jersey seaside motel Thursday night and arrested while trying to flee with an 11-year-old boy he had grabbed, federal officials said yesterday.The man, Matarawy Mohammad Said Saleh, 44, became the 11th suspect seized in what authorities have charged was a conspiracy by Muslim militants to explode bombs in the Holland and Lincoln tunnels, the United Nations and the Federal Building, which houses the FBI. A second man accused of hiding Mr. Saleh was also arrested.
NEWS
By JOHN HORN and JOHN HORN,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 30, 2006
HOLLYWOOD -- Like any unknown actor looking for his big break, Khalid Abdalla was eager to be cast in a movie, especially a studio production. Yet when the 25-year-old performer heard about a possible lead part in a forthcoming Universal Studios film, Abdalla considered turning it down. The hesitation was understandable: The acting job was playing Ziad Jarrah, the hijacker at the controls of the Sept. 11 jetliner that crashed into a Pennsylvania field, killing all 40 passengers and crew on board, in United 93. As filmmakers tell a number of stories about Sept.
NEWS
March 11, 2006
One of many tales: It's June 2001. Yusef Abdullah Saleh Al Rubesh leaves his home in Saudi Arabia to go to Afghanistan, where his brother is fighting for the Taliban, to persuade him to come back and live with the family again. Mr. Saleh gets to Afghanistan, but he brings along musical tapes and cigarettes, and is clean-shaven. All this is forbidden under the Taliban, and he is thrown into a prison in Kabul. Months go by, and finally he gets word out to his brother, who arranges his release.
NEWS
By Doug Struck and Doug Struck,Staff Writer | January 24, 1993
AMMAN, Jordan -- Deportation is watching your son' marriage on videotape months after the event. It is being helpless to go to your mother as she grows old and feeble. It is missing your father's funeral and having grandchildren who are strangers.It is having a house, and land, and friends you have not seen in 19 years.This is the pain of exile for Abdul Jawad Saleh, a Palestinian deported by Israel in 1973. When he heard of the expulsion of 415 Palestinians last month, the anger returned.
NEWS
By CLARENCE PAGE | January 31, 2006
SANA, YEMEN -- A lot of people were alarmed to see that Palestinians gave the terrorist Hamas organization an upset victory last week over the reputedly corrupt Fatah in parliament elections. But in this part of the world, any change of power through ballots instead of bullets is a good day. The big news just happened to find me also in the Middle East, but at the other end of the Arabian peninsula, trying to spread a little more democracy through freedom of the press, particularly to some courageous journalists in terrorism-tainted Yemen.
NEWS
By JOHN MURPHY and JOHN MURPHY,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | November 5, 2005
DAMASCUS, Syria -- Syria's prison system must wonder where it went wrong with Yassin Haj Saleh. After serving a 16-year sentence for criticizing Syria's authoritarian government, Saleh walked out of his cell, only to renew his calls for the Syrian government to embrace democratic reforms. His bruising critiques of Syria's President Bashar Assad have grown louder since a U.N. investigation named top Syrian officials as suspects in the assassination of former Lebanese Prime Minister Rafik Hariri.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | April 17, 1995
It all began a couple of years ago in Washington, when Steven Saleh called up Craig Kraft, an artist who makes sculptures using light, and asked him to make a pair of neon crutches.Out of that grew "Light as a Helping Hand," the exhibit now on view at the new Merrick School of Business building at the University of Baltimore. It's a show that uses light to address communities with special needs -- among them the sight- and hearing-impaired, people with seasonal affective disorder and people with AIDS.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 4, 2004
BAGHDAD, Iraq - U.S. military commanders said yesterday that they had selected a new commander for the Iraqi security force in Fallujah, dropping a general who had been accused of involvement in widespread repression under Saddam Hussein. The U.S. commanders said they had chosen Muhammad Latif, a former intelligence officer, to lead the Iraqi security force. Unlike the man he is replacing, Maj. Gen. Jassim Muhammed Saleh, Latif appears to have been regarded as an opponent of Hussein. According to a former Iraqi officer who served under him, Latif was imprisoned for seven years in the 1990s after he disobeyed an order from Hussein involving the movement of his troops.
NEWS
March 11, 2006
One of many tales: It's June 2001. Yusef Abdullah Saleh Al Rubesh leaves his home in Saudi Arabia to go to Afghanistan, where his brother is fighting for the Taliban, to persuade him to come back and live with the family again. Mr. Saleh gets to Afghanistan, but he brings along musical tapes and cigarettes, and is clean-shaven. All this is forbidden under the Taliban, and he is thrown into a prison in Kabul. Months go by, and finally he gets word out to his brother, who arranges his release.
NEWS
By CLARENCE PAGE | January 31, 2006
SANA, YEMEN -- A lot of people were alarmed to see that Palestinians gave the terrorist Hamas organization an upset victory last week over the reputedly corrupt Fatah in parliament elections. But in this part of the world, any change of power through ballots instead of bullets is a good day. The big news just happened to find me also in the Middle East, but at the other end of the Arabian peninsula, trying to spread a little more democracy through freedom of the press, particularly to some courageous journalists in terrorism-tainted Yemen.
NEWS
By JOHN MURPHY and JOHN MURPHY,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | November 5, 2005
DAMASCUS, Syria -- Syria's prison system must wonder where it went wrong with Yassin Haj Saleh. After serving a 16-year sentence for criticizing Syria's authoritarian government, Saleh walked out of his cell, only to renew his calls for the Syrian government to embrace democratic reforms. His bruising critiques of Syria's President Bashar Assad have grown louder since a U.N. investigation named top Syrian officials as suspects in the assassination of former Lebanese Prime Minister Rafik Hariri.
NEWS
May 7, 2004
SHARON SEGAL CUNNINGHAM SALEH, of Alpharetta, died May 6, 2004. Sharon is survived by her husband Jim Saleh, her daughters Ashley Cunningham and Emily Cunningham Hancock and her sisters Hannah Solkey and Roslyn Schmidt and her brother Michael Segal. Graveside Services will be held Friday, May 7, 2004 at 12:30 P.M. at Arlington Memorial Park in Sandy Spring. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to the Southeastern Brain Tumor Foundation, P.O. Box 422471, Atlanta, GA 30342.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 4, 2004
BAGHDAD, Iraq - U.S. military commanders said yesterday that they had selected a new commander for the Iraqi security force in Fallujah, dropping a general who had been accused of involvement in widespread repression under Saddam Hussein. The U.S. commanders said they had chosen Muhammad Latif, a former intelligence officer, to lead the Iraqi security force. Unlike the man he is replacing, Maj. Gen. Jassim Muhammed Saleh, Latif appears to have been regarded as an opponent of Hussein. According to a former Iraqi officer who served under him, Latif was imprisoned for seven years in the 1990s after he disobeyed an order from Hussein involving the movement of his troops.
SPORTS
March 6, 2001
Baseball Indians: Signed IF John McDonald to one-year contract. Rockies: Optioned P Josh Kalinowski to Triple-A Colorado Springs. Yankees: Reassigned P Todd Noel, P Brandon Reed, P Brian Rogers, P John Ambrose and P Mike Bertotti to minor-league camp. Basketball Grizzlies: Activated G Kevin Edwards and placed G Brent Price on injured list. Knicks: Activated C Travis Knight and placed G Rick Brunson on IR. Pistons: Activated F Jud Buechler and placed F Brian Cardinal on IR College Maryland: A Andrew "Buggs" Combs was named ACC men's lacrosse Player of the Week.
SPORTS
March 6, 2001
Baseball Indians: Signed IF John McDonald to one-year contract. Rockies: Optioned P Josh Kalinowski to Triple-A Colorado Springs. Yankees: Reassigned P Todd Noel, P Brandon Reed, P Brian Rogers, P John Ambrose and P Mike Bertotti to minor-league camp. Basketball Grizzlies: Activated G Kevin Edwards and placed G Brent Price on injured list. Knicks: Activated C Travis Knight and placed G Rick Brunson on IR. Pistons: Activated F Jud Buechler and placed F Brian Cardinal on IR College Maryland: A Andrew "Buggs" Combs was named ACC men's lacrosse Player of the Week.
NEWS
By Ned Parker and Ali Hameed and Ned Parker and Ali Hameed,Los Angeles Times | January 3, 2009
BAGHDAD - The Sunni and Shiite tribesmen had come from across Iraq to turn the page on the fratricidal violence that tore the country apart in the years after the 2003 U.S.-led invasion. But as they met yesterday, an 18-year-old member of the tribe blew himself up, killing at least 23 people and providing a jarring reminder of the obstacles to reconciliation, even within one clan. Some members of the Qarqouly tribe had not seen each other for more than six years and had hoped to revive old ties after weathering the religious extremism and sectarian fighting that divided Iraq and destroyed families and friendships.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | April 17, 1995
It all began a couple of years ago in Washington, when Steven Saleh called up Craig Kraft, an artist who makes sculptures using light, and asked him to make a pair of neon crutches.Out of that grew "Light as a Helping Hand," the exhibit now on view at the new Merrick School of Business building at the University of Baltimore. It's a show that uses light to address communities with special needs -- among them the sight- and hearing-impaired, people with seasonal affective disorder and people with AIDS.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | January 7, 1994
"The Air Up There" is the sort of movie that hardly gets made any more: expertly choreographed piffle.It is lighter than a no-cal souffle and as manipulative as a crossword puzzle, but it also shows why formulas become formulas: because they work and because they're pretty much critic-proof.Ultimately, this is the formula about the Big Game. It has all the high-church hallmarks of the genre: the hopeless team hastily assembled, the stakes jimmied up much higher than a normal athletic contest, the early lead by the opponents, the injury of a key player, the arrival of a last-minute sleeper, and the final countdown as the time leaks off the clock and our heroes, down by one, drive for a winning score.
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