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Salary Increases

NEWS
By Sharahn D. Boykin and Sharahn D. Boykin,SUN REPORTER | June 24, 2007
The Annapolis Police Department's union and the city will head back to the bargaining table, after union members overwhelmingly rejected the city's first salary and benefit proposal. "We are tired of working shorthanded! We are tired of the lack of recruiting efforts by the city! We are just tired!" read a flier distributed by the United Food and Commercial Workers Local 400. On Thursday the union turned down the city's offer of a 2 percent cost-of-living increase. It is seeking 8 percent.
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NEWS
By John Fritze and John Fritze,Sun reporter | May 26, 2007
By increasing the size of her staff and providing salary bumps to dozens of employees, Baltimore Mayor Sheila Dixon has increased the payroll of the mayor's office by nearly 15 percent since taking office in January. Top Dixon administration officials and their aides - about 87 employees in all - are being paid nearly $5 million a year, according to an analysis of payroll data by The Sun. That is up a little more than $640,000 a year from the waning months of Martin O'Malley's mayoral administration.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Reporter | April 8, 2007
During the winter, the Harford County school board labored long hours trying to decide on the right combination of new positions and programs to include for next year. But now the board is in retreat mode. After its request for a $20 million increase in the school budget for next year was cut to about $8 million by County Executive David R. Craig, the board worked last week to scale back its plan, facing the reality that many of the anticipated enhancements envisioned for 2007-2008 school year will not materialize.
NEWS
March 29, 2007
If members of the Baltimore City Council think the public doesn't know they voted themselves a raise, they are living in la-la land. Their vote not to reject a salary increase recommendation isn't fooling anyone. The question is: Why not just vote openly for a pay raise? An independent commission recommended the increases as called for in a new law designed to keep elected officials from setting their own pay raises (a good thing). The proposed raises for council members, council president, comptroller and mayor are in line with salaries in Philadelphia and Washington.
NEWS
By John Fritze and John Fritze,Sun reporter | March 23, 2007
Baltimore's City Council yesterday allowed a series of pay raises for city officials to stay alive -- a step that likely will permit the bill to be passed without anyone having to directly vote for it. At a public hearing yesterday that drew only one member of the public -- a man named Larry Ridgely, who is opposed to the pay increases -- the City Council voted 8-3, with one abstention, to not reject the proposed increases in salary, a de facto approval....
NEWS
By John Fritze and John Fritze,Sun Reporter | March 22, 2007
City Councilman Kenneth N. Harris Sr., a candidate for City Council president, called on his opponent yesterday to reschedule a hearing over proposed salary increases for city officials so that more people can attend. The proposed increases, which would bump the mayor's salary from $125,000 to $148,000 and a City Council member's salary from $48,000 to $57,000, will be the subject of a hearing by the full City Council at 10 a.m. today at City Hall. Harris said the timing prohibits people with day jobs from attending.
NEWS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,Sun Reporter | January 21, 2007
Carroll County commissioners will unveil a package of six bills tomorrow before members of the state delegation to Annapolis for consideration in the 2007 General Assembly session. Noticeably absent from this package is any proposal to enact a transfer tax -- a levy on real estate transactions the previous board had lobbied for since 2002. Instead, the commissioners are pushing for the local regulation of pawnshops, a stronger county cleanup law and tax credits for residents who renovate their properties in gateway areas near the county's borders.
SPORTS
By Gary Lambrecht and Gary Lambrecht,SUN REPORTER | December 8, 2006
Navy football coach Paul Johnson, who was a candidate this week to take over at North Carolina State before the school reportedly settled on Boston College coach Tom O'Brien, is about to be rewarded by the academy. Sources close to Johnson said he is due a raise that would increase his compensation to nearly $1.8 million per year if he meets certain incentives. Johnson's six-year contract, which includes an annual, incentive-based rollover clause that will kick in Jan. 1, currently is worth about $1.3 million per year.
NEWS
By LAURA MCCANDLISH and LAURA MCCANDLISH,SUN REPORTER | May 7, 2006
Westminster to adopt budget The Westminster City Council is expected to adopt tomorrow night its fiscal year 2007 budget that calls for increases in property taxes and water and sewer rates. The budget proposal called for a 15 percent property tax increase and a 20 percent rise in water and sewer rates, stirring opposition among residents. But officials said last week the mayor and council members are reconsidering the property tax increase. To ease the burden, the mayor and council are looking at a 10 percent property tax increase, said Joseph D. Urban, the city's finance director.
SPORTS
By JAMISON HENSLEY and JAMISON HENSLEY,SUN REPORTER | March 10, 2006
A boost in this year's salary cap doesn't mean the Ravens will be suddenly signing quarterback Drew Brees and running back Edgerrin James. More money for the Ravens - a spending limit increase for every team from $94.5 million to $102 million for this season as a result of the new collective bargaining agreement - provides more hope of keeping their own free agents. The Ravens can now aggressively try to re-sign linebacker Bart Scott and defensive end Tony Weaver, two starters who appeared to be on their way out before Wednesday's CBA extension.
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