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By Janell Sutherland | March 12, 2012
What do you get with some marital conflict, product placement, joking around and weepy, back-slapping man hugs? "The Amazing Race"in Italy, obviously.   Hamartia I finally get to use the word hamartia in a recap to show off my knowledge of old terminology from Greek literature! Check that off my bucket list! It means fatal flaw, and it frequently points its hamartanein finger at pride.   Ralph and JJ, the Border Patrol Agents, are full of pride (or hubris, if we are still flinging fancy words around)
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Janell Sutherland | March 12, 2012
What do you get with some marital conflict, product placement, joking around and weepy, back-slapping man hugs? "The Amazing Race"in Italy, obviously.   Hamartia I finally get to use the word hamartia in a recap to show off my knowledge of old terminology from Greek literature! Check that off my bucket list! It means fatal flaw, and it frequently points its hamartanein finger at pride.   Ralph and JJ, the Border Patrol Agents, are full of pride (or hubris, if we are still flinging fancy words around)
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NEWS
By William Safire | February 9, 1994
FIVE thousand years ago, ancient man invented writing. Five hundred years ago, Renaissance man invented the printing press. Fifty years ago, modern man invented the computer. Five years ago, postmodern man, or person -- by conceiving of all knowledge as a universal salami, sliceable and compressible -- put the world of information at our beck and call.We have not yet felt the impact of that most recent revolution of communication. Here's a way to grasp the potential of digitization and compression:You know how all the old liberals are demanding huge expenditures on bigger prisons with no exits, to accommodate more and more criminals?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2011
John Lindner reviews a kosher Subway in Pikesville. What, you were expecting Arbutus? John's review, which appears in Monday's Sunrise section, takes a look at the offerings at the area's first kosher Subway outlett -- there are others in Los Angeles, Cleveland, Chicago, Kansas City and Queens, N.Y. According to the store's website , the store is really, truly kosher ("under the supervision of the Star-K") and not just kosher-style. Familiar Subway offerings are here but also salami, corned beef and schwarma.
NEWS
By SAM SESSA and SAM SESSA,SUN REPORTER | June 14, 2006
Nino's Pizza & Subs Fazzini's 578 Cranbrook Road, Cockeysville -- 410-667-6104 Hours --11:30 a.m.-9:30 p.m. Sundays-Thursdays; 11:30 a.m.-11 p.m. Fridays-Saturdays Restaurant's estimate --a few minutes Ready in --13 minutes Smaller than the other three, the dome-shaped "Italian Calzone," $6.83, was packed with flavorful pepperoni, provolone, salami and capicolla ham. We'd go back to Fazzini's first. Know of a good carryout place? Let us hear about it. Write to sam.sessa@baltsun.com.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2011
John Lindner reviews a kosher Subway in Pikesville. What, you were expecting Arbutus? John's review, which appears in Monday's Sunrise section, takes a look at the offerings at the area's first kosher Subway outlett -- there are others in Los Angeles, Cleveland, Chicago, Kansas City and Queens, N.Y. According to the store's website , the store is really, truly kosher ("under the supervision of the Star-K") and not just kosher-style. Familiar Subway offerings are here but also salami, corned beef and schwarma.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | September 20, 1992
Oakland -- I ate a lot of fine food when in San Francisc recently. I ate Dungeness crab stuffed in tiny tomatoes. I ate chicken laced with garlic and cooked in a wood burning stove. I ate a cioppino, an elaborate seafood stew, served over soft polenta.Then one day I played hooky from cuisine. I got a salami sandwich and went to a baseball game in Oakland. It was the best part of my trip. It reminded me of Baltimore.The salami was the dry cured kind that is a specialty of the Bay area. This batch was made by the Molinari company in SanFrancisco.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | January 10, 1991
Are they beautiful or what?Here is Jim Parker, immortal pro football Hall of Famer with a team called the Baltimore Colts, No. 77 in your program and No. 275 on the weight chart during his svelte playing days.He is standing in his package goods store at Liberty Heights Avenue and Garrison Boulevard yesterday morning with a tray of ham and eggs and grits in front of him that, now that you mention it, he seems to be inhaling.And here is Art Donovan, immortal pro football Hall of Famer with those same Baltimore Colts, No. 70 in your program and No. 270 on the weight chart in his lean and hungry playing days.
NEWS
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | October 9, 2002
NEW YORK - On a dazzling Sunday morning people stare as Calvin Trillin leads a herd of 40 amateur food anthropologists on a pilgrimage through the winding, funky, teeming, abundant streets of Lower Manhattan. Trillin, the New Yorker staff writer perhaps best-known for his celebration of real food in three published collections since compiled as the Tummy Trilogy, has drawn a sold-out crowd for Come Hungry, one of the excursions offered as part of the magazine's annual cultural festival.
FEATURES
By Marjorie Weinman Sharmat | January 19, 2000
Editor's note: A young New Yorker's ideas of what life is like out West make him apprehensive about his family's move there. I live at 165 East 95th Street, New York City, and I'm going to stay here forever. My mother and father are moving. Out West. They say I have to go, too. They say I can't stay here forever. Out West nobody plays baseball because they're too busy chasing buffaloes. And there's cactus everywhere you look. But if you don't look, you have to stand up just as soon as you sit down.
NEWS
By SAM SESSA and SAM SESSA,SUN REPORTER | June 14, 2006
Nino's Pizza & Subs Fazzini's 578 Cranbrook Road, Cockeysville -- 410-667-6104 Hours --11:30 a.m.-9:30 p.m. Sundays-Thursdays; 11:30 a.m.-11 p.m. Fridays-Saturdays Restaurant's estimate --a few minutes Ready in --13 minutes Smaller than the other three, the dome-shaped "Italian Calzone," $6.83, was packed with flavorful pepperoni, provolone, salami and capicolla ham. We'd go back to Fazzini's first. Know of a good carryout place? Let us hear about it. Write to sam.sessa@baltsun.com.
NEWS
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | October 9, 2002
NEW YORK - On a dazzling Sunday morning people stare as Calvin Trillin leads a herd of 40 amateur food anthropologists on a pilgrimage through the winding, funky, teeming, abundant streets of Lower Manhattan. Trillin, the New Yorker staff writer perhaps best-known for his celebration of real food in three published collections since compiled as the Tummy Trilogy, has drawn a sold-out crowd for Come Hungry, one of the excursions offered as part of the magazine's annual cultural festival.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | March 11, 2001
As a child growing up in New York City, I often had occasion to pass our neighborhood bakery, whose large plate glass windows seemed eternally lined with row upon row of tempting confections. No matter how urgent my mission, I always found time to linger in front of this display, and to admire the stacked cylinders of white wedding cakes with their tiny plastic brides and grooms on top, looking down on regimented files of cookies, eclairs and other pastry treats arrayed with what seemed like military precision.
FEATURES
By Marjorie Weinman Sharmat | January 19, 2000
Editor's note: A young New Yorker's ideas of what life is like out West make him apprehensive about his family's move there. I live at 165 East 95th Street, New York City, and I'm going to stay here forever. My mother and father are moving. Out West. They say I have to go, too. They say I can't stay here forever. Out West nobody plays baseball because they're too busy chasing buffaloes. And there's cactus everywhere you look. But if you don't look, you have to stand up just as soon as you sit down.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 29, 1999
By day, Sam Salamy is the kind of administrator parents hope is assigned to their child's part of the alphabet. The popular assistant principal has been one of Annapolis High School's greatest assets over the past decade.But Salamy has another side.A guitarist and prolific songwriter, he has become a fixture on the local club circuit, performing with his band, Destiny, and as a duo with singer-bassist Ed Brown.Salamy and Brown have released their first compact disc, which is sold at Tower Records of Annapolis and Borders Books in Bowie.
NEWS
By William Safire | February 9, 1994
FIVE thousand years ago, ancient man invented writing. Five hundred years ago, Renaissance man invented the printing press. Fifty years ago, modern man invented the computer. Five years ago, postmodern man, or person -- by conceiving of all knowledge as a universal salami, sliceable and compressible -- put the world of information at our beck and call.We have not yet felt the impact of that most recent revolution of communication. Here's a way to grasp the potential of digitization and compression:You know how all the old liberals are demanding huge expenditures on bigger prisons with no exits, to accommodate more and more criminals?
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Staff Writer | November 20, 1992
FREDERICK -- The days when Maryland grocery shoppers couldn't do their banking at the supermarket now are fading into ancient history -- two days of history, actually.Yesterday was the grand opening of First National Bank of Maryland's full-service branches in three Weis supermarkets in Frederick. But two of the branches had been open a day or two before the hoopla of yesterday's three ribbon-cutting ceremonies.The experience so far, according to First National officials, has been encouraging.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | March 11, 2001
As a child growing up in New York City, I often had occasion to pass our neighborhood bakery, whose large plate glass windows seemed eternally lined with row upon row of tempting confections. No matter how urgent my mission, I always found time to linger in front of this display, and to admire the stacked cylinders of white wedding cakes with their tiny plastic brides and grooms on top, looking down on regimented files of cookies, eclairs and other pastry treats arrayed with what seemed like military precision.
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Staff Writer | November 20, 1992
FREDERICK -- The days when Maryland grocery shoppers couldn't do their banking at the supermarket now are fading into ancient history -- two days of history, actually.Yesterday was the grand opening of First National Bank of Maryland's full-service branches in three Weis supermarkets in Frederick. But two of the branches had been open a day or two before the hoopla of yesterday's three ribbon-cutting ceremonies.The experience so far, according to First National officials, has been encouraging.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | September 20, 1992
Oakland -- I ate a lot of fine food when in San Francisc recently. I ate Dungeness crab stuffed in tiny tomatoes. I ate chicken laced with garlic and cooked in a wood burning stove. I ate a cioppino, an elaborate seafood stew, served over soft polenta.Then one day I played hooky from cuisine. I got a salami sandwich and went to a baseball game in Oakland. It was the best part of my trip. It reminded me of Baltimore.The salami was the dry cured kind that is a specialty of the Bay area. This batch was made by the Molinari company in SanFrancisco.
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