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By Joanne E. Morvay | December 15, 1999
* Item: Dole Great Restaurant Salads* What you get: 2 1/2 servings* Cost: About $3* Preparation time: Open bag and serve* Review: I'm definitely a fan of pre-cut salad greens. But I'm not sure these new bagged salads from Dole are worth the price. The Triple Cheese Toss consisted of mixed greens with a small envelope of grated cheese you could just as easily come up with yourself -- even if it was pre-grated from a can in your refrigerator. No other dressing was included. The Mediterranean Marinade offered a similar mix of greens with a dressing spiked with peppers and mushrooms that honestly tasted more like a thick marinade.
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FEATURES
By Jill Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | December 28, 2011
New Year's resolutions are the kiss of death. We all know this. So instead of drafting some sweeping resolution we know darn well we'll never keep, how about thinking small for 2012. How about trying one thing — maybe two — that just might nudge you a tiny bit closer to "fit" and "healthy. " And don't take it from us — we asked local folks who each, in their own way, have already resolved to live healthy, fit lives, to share one fitness secret and healthful eating tip. These things work for them.
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NEWS
By Bill Daley and Bill Daley,Chicago Tribune | September 27, 2006
Chicken Tonnato is a spin on the classic Italian veal dish. It's served chilled, making it a refreshing meal at lunch or dinner. Tonnato is an Italian word derived from tonno, or tuna - which points to the starring role fish has in this dish. Use the best canned tuna you can, preferably Italian and packed in olive oil. Serve the chicken, sliced, on a mound of salad greens. Bill Daley writes for the Chicago Tribune, which supplied the recipe and analysis. Chicken Tonnato Serves 4 -- Total time: 35 minutes 4 boneless, skinless chicken breast halves 1/4 teaspoon each: salt, freshly ground pepper 1/3 cup dry white wine or chicken broth 4 cups mixed salad greens SAUCE: 1 can (6 ounces)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rob Kasper | June 8, 2010
It happens every June: the invasion of the salad greens. Those little seeds that seemed so inconsequential back in April when you scattered them on the moist garden ground have now come to life, and with a vengeance. This year the combination of abundant moisture and relatively cool days have produced lush crops of lettuce and other greens. Even if you don't grow your own, the mounds of lettuce and its verdant relatives that appear at area farmers markets are signs that is a good season for salads.
FEATURES
May 15, 1991
Canned salmon, a staple in many cupboards, takes on a new air of sophistication with the simple addition of fresh grated ginger, aromatic cilantro and savory green onions. The salmon mixture is formed into small patties and lightly sauteed to a golden brown and then presented on a bed of mixed salad greens in a sweet and tangy orange-ginger vinaigrette. This recipe is from the Alaska Seafood Marketing Institute.Pacific Rim Salmon1 can (15 1/2 ounces) salmon1 cup dry bread crumbs1/2 cup sliced green onions2 tablespoons chopped cilantro1 teaspoon grated fresh ginger3 egg whitesAdditional dry bread crumbs, for coatingVegetable oil, for frying6 to 8 cups mixed salad greensOrange-ginger vinaigrette, recipe follows.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Sun Staff | May 10, 2000
Diane Van Bleikom of Johnstown, Pa., requested a recipe for a Spinning Bowl Salad. "It was a featured item at the Twentieth Century Restaurant in Youngstown, Ohio, which closed about 10 years ago," she wrote. "I'm hoping someone has the recipe, which was fabulous." From Audrey Feldkamp of Marengo, Ill., came the recipe and a touch of its history. Feldkamp wrote, "Actually, this recipe was a longtime trademark of the Blackhawk restaurant in Chicago, and they still make it today at their restaurant in Wheeling, Ill. It has a long speech that goes with it about the number of ingredients ... [and]
FEATURES
By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,Special to The Sun | August 3, 1994
In the height of summer when the weather whets the appetite for nothing more than ice cream, beat the head -- and the clock -- with this filling but rapid salad. The last thing we want with high temperatures and humidity is a steamy kitchen or a labor intensive meal. There is no need to heat up the kitchen here! Just throw these cool ingredients together to make a savory concoction of mixed greens, crunchy fresh vegetables and leftover, smokey grilled steak. The trick is to plan and cook enough steak, either a flank or London broil, so you have enough for a second meal.
FEATURES
By Charlyne Varkonyi | July 17, 1991
I know what you are going to say. The only way to prepare Maryland soft shell crabs is the way we have always done it -- dust them in flour, salt and pepper and deep fry in oil or saute in butter. Nothing more. Nothing less. Case closed.Well, it's time to open your minds. Just this one time. Trust me. I have taken some of the basics of soft crabs and added a modern twist -- slivered almonds sauted in butter with a touch of Amaretto. The liqueur intensifies the flavor of the almonds and adds an interesting contrast of sweetness while allowing the distinctive flavor of the crab to come through.
FEATURES
By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,Contributing Writer | July 29, 1992
The popularity of pasta in the United States continues to grow by leaps and bounds. With many folks now eating it several times a week, and some, every night of the week, new pasta recipes are always in great demand.Red sauces with vegetables make an especially quick and wholesome companion for pasta, because there are some very high quality jarred red sauces on the market and, of course, vegetables are always readily available from the supermarket salad bar, the produce department or the frozen food department.
NEWS
By Donna Pierce and Donna Pierce,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 6, 2005
Until I discovered that my fishmonger would happily clean soft-shelled crabs for me, I shied away from taking full advantage of the crustaceans during their short season, which has a midsummer curtain call. So, with the fishmonger's help, this salad comes together in a few minutes for a quick dinner on the deck or terrace. Dress the salad with prepared aioli, a garlicky mayonnaise. Beverage pairing For wines, try a chenin blanc or vinho verde or drink a sparkling water with lemon twists.
NEWS
By Bill Daley and Bill Daley,Chicago Tribune | September 27, 2006
Chicken Tonnato is a spin on the classic Italian veal dish. It's served chilled, making it a refreshing meal at lunch or dinner. Tonnato is an Italian word derived from tonno, or tuna - which points to the starring role fish has in this dish. Use the best canned tuna you can, preferably Italian and packed in olive oil. Serve the chicken, sliced, on a mound of salad greens. Bill Daley writes for the Chicago Tribune, which supplied the recipe and analysis. Chicken Tonnato Serves 4 -- Total time: 35 minutes 4 boneless, skinless chicken breast halves 1/4 teaspoon each: salt, freshly ground pepper 1/3 cup dry white wine or chicken broth 4 cups mixed salad greens SAUCE: 1 can (6 ounces)
NEWS
By SUSAN REIMER and SUSAN REIMER,SUN REPORTER | August 16, 2006
Like a ripe tomato, still warm from the vine, and white corn, so crunchy-sweet it hardly needs cooking, a vinaigrette is an essential building block for the perfect summer meal. Vinegar and oil, combined despite their best efforts to remain apart and distinct, give every summer menu item -- from a grilled steak to salad greens -- a chance to be better. "Vinaigrettes are so incredibly versatile," said Real Simple magazine food editor Renee Schettler. "Especially this time of year when we have access to so many vegetables that require only a chop or a slice."
NEWS
By Donna Pierce and Donna Pierce,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 6, 2005
Until I discovered that my fishmonger would happily clean soft-shelled crabs for me, I shied away from taking full advantage of the crustaceans during their short season, which has a midsummer curtain call. So, with the fishmonger's help, this salad comes together in a few minutes for a quick dinner on the deck or terrace. Dress the salad with prepared aioli, a garlicky mayonnaise. Beverage pairing For wines, try a chenin blanc or vinho verde or drink a sparkling water with lemon twists.
NEWS
By Renee Enna and Renee Enna,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | June 23, 2004
Main-dish salads, especially those that work hot or cold, add flexibility to a cook's schedule. If you have time, you could make this dish before work and have it waiting when you return home. This recipe uses Japanese soba noodles, made of buckwheat and wheat, which add heft to an entree salad. These are sold in many supermarkets, as well as ethnic and specialty stores. (However, spaghetti noodles will work just fine.) Likewise, if you can't find hoisin sauce, 4 tablespoons of soy sauce can be used in place of the hoisin/soy combination.
NEWS
By Laura Loh and Laura Loh,Sun Staff | April 11, 2004
I'm stooping next to a shallow soil bed, dropping a lettuce seed into a furrow that I just made with my finger, when it hits me. I'm planting this thing, and it will grow. Never mind that it's been thousands of years since a human being first found out that putting a seed into the ground could result in a new food-bearing plant. I feel like a pioneer, and I'd like to shout my discovery to the world. But because I'm in the Hampden community garden, and there are children in a playground nearby, I don't.
NEWS
By Bev Bennett and Bev Bennett,tribune media services | December 14, 2003
Eating a radish requires a leap of faith. With its sharp, biting reputation, it doesn't invite timid appetites. Yet a radish's plump shape and vivid color are so tempting, it's hard to resist. Fortunately this root vegetable's charms outweigh its pungent nature. And radishes offer so much variety that if one type is too potent, you can find another that is more to your liking. Cherry Belle is probably the radish you're most familiar with. The bright red globes, ranging in size from a nickel to a silver dollar, deliver snap and crunch in the white-fleshed interior.
FEATURES
By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 16, 1998
Refreshing and satisfying, this quick dish makes an easy transition from summer into fall - when our great oysters are back in season, yet we're still dealing with the lingering heat. Buying fresh oysters is best. You may ask your fishmonger to shuck the oysters and save the shells for you. (They are great to save and have on hand if you use jarred oysters and need shells for presentation).Serve some hearty bread with the entree salad or bread sticks or crunchy lavosh crackers.For dessert, just indulge in some chocolate ice cream or some frozen yogurt sprinkled with crushed peanut crunch candy bars.
NEWS
By Susan Nicholson and Susan Nicholson,Universal Press Syndicate | September 3, 2000
Each day of the week offers a menu aimed at a different aspect of meal planning. There's a family meal, a kids' menu aimed at younger tastes, a heat-and-eat meal that recycles leftovers, a budget meal that employs a cost-cutting strategy, a meatless or "less meat" dish for people who may not be strict vegetarians but are trying to cut down on meat, an express meal that requires little or no preparation, and an entertaining menu that's quick. SUNDAY / Family Prepare your own baked ham for the family today.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | January 22, 2003
As if on cue, into the Chiapparelli's restaurant server's station steps a busboy carrying a plastic salad bowl large enough to bathe a Rottweiler, filled to brimming with lettuce - iceberg lettuce. Head waitress Ida Talucci was just saying: "Iceberg gets a bad rap." Another one of these immense salad bowls sits off to the side, empty but for stray iceberg remnants, a little red onion and tomato shiny with the residue of oil and vinegar. Just before noon on a Tuesday one load of iceberg lettuce has already been served and another load is about to be, which must say something about what a dicey thing it is to say what is or is not a trend.
NEWS
By Jody K. Vilschick and Jody K. Vilschick,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 17, 2002
Tucked in behind Howard County General Hospital and next to Howard Community College, Charter Deli opened to "serve the business and residential community," according to Tom Mash, the restaurant's owner. "I've been waiting for years to open a good deli in Columbia," he said. "When this building came along and the owner asked if I was interested, I jumped at the chance." Mash co-owned and operated a delicatessen in Silver Spring for almost 18 years before opening Charter Deli in June with his wife, Sandy.
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