Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSalad Bowl
IN THE NEWS

Salad Bowl

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | April 22, 2001
Entertaining: Sweet and pungent tastes herald spring's burst of activity. My husband and I looked at the calendar the other day and couldn't believe how hectic our spring is going to be. Three sets of out-of-town company are scheduled to arrive in the next few weeks. Friends have invited us to spend a weekend cooking with them at their nearby country farmhouse, and we are planning to give a party in honor of several seniors graduating from Amherst College, where my spouse teaches. I am looking forward to this new season, a favorite of cooks everywhere.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, For The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2013
Joann Levin of Baltimore was looking for the recipe for the chopped salad that was served at the now-closed Maison Marconi restaurant in downtown Baltimore. Marconi's, which opened in 1920, was an institution in Baltimore famous for its Old World charm. It was favorite dining spot of such notables as H.L. Mencken. Marconi's endured for years until the early 2000s, when it was purchased by Orioles owner Peter Angelos, immediately redecorated and then shut down. The restaurant and some of its signature dishes remain near and dear to many, as indicated by the number of requests I continue to receive for some of its most famous recipes.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, For The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2013
Joann Levin of Baltimore was looking for the recipe for the chopped salad that was served at the now-closed Maison Marconi restaurant in downtown Baltimore. Marconi's, which opened in 1920, was an institution in Baltimore famous for its Old World charm. It was favorite dining spot of such notables as H.L. Mencken. Marconi's endured for years until the early 2000s, when it was purchased by Orioles owner Peter Angelos, immediately redecorated and then shut down. The restaurant and some of its signature dishes remain near and dear to many, as indicated by the number of requests I continue to receive for some of its most famous recipes.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | April 7, 2011
James Bernard "Jimmy" Watkins Jr., a veteran Baltimore & Ohio Railroad dining car chef who during his 36-year career prepared thousands of meals for passengers, including Presidents Franklin D. Roosevelt and Harry S. Truman, died March 30 of prostate cancer at his Pikesville home. He was 89. Mr. Watkins was born in Baltimore and raised in Glen Burnie, and was a 1939 graduate of Glen Burnie High School. He began his cooking career in the late 1930s, working as a lunch counter cook at Read's drugstore at Howard and Lexington streets, and soon began looking for a better job because "they didn't pay no money," he said in a 34-page typed transcript of a taped interview made for the Hays T. Watkins Research Library at the B&O Railroad Museum in Baltimore in 2002.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie | June 26, 1996
Uncomplicate food, cookbook author saysThe idea that "good food does not have to be complicated" pretty much sums up Marie Simmons' approach to cooking, and it's the underlying theme of her new book, "Fresh & Fast" (Chapters, $29.95). Recipes include mussels in white wine with fresh tomato salsa, black bean and yellow rice salad with fresh corn and tomatoes, and melon and berries with lime sugar syrup.Gadget savvyIt's probably happened to you. You buy a clever gadget, then when you get it home, you wonder which is dumber, you or the device.
FEATURES
By Dolly Merritt | February 18, 1995
Around the house* Recycle fabric-softener sheets. Place in the bottom of flower pots to cover drainage holes; staple ends to hangers to keep clothes from sliding off.* Keep steel wool soap pad inside sealed plastic bag after use. This will prevent rust and increase pad's use.* Loosen stains from carpet immediately with a drop of ice water or ice cube. This will prevent deeper staining when nothing else is handy.* Prevent soggy lettuce and vegetables when making a tossed salad. Wash, drain and prepare vegetables ahead of time.
NEWS
By ERNEST W. LEFEVER | August 3, 1993
On July 2, just before Independence Day, in Tucson, Ariz., 75 Mexican immigrants and one Peruvian, all wearing small American flags, became naturalized U.S. citizens. Nothing unusual, except that the half-hour swearing-in ceremony was conducted largely in Spanish at the request of U.S. District Judge Alfredo Marquez.This dismayed many earlier immigrants who took pride in learning the language of their adopted country, as will a new, 53-page U.S. Department of Education guide, ''Preparing Your Child for University,'' written entirely in Spanish.
FEATURES
By Mary Maushard | November 7, 1991
Mo's Fishermans' Wharf Restaurant at the Inner Harbor boasts of having one of the area's largest seafood menus. While that would be difficult to prove, it is certainly one of the biggest I have seen.The menu lists more than 20 fish, not including shellfish. They can be had broiled, fried, poached, stuffed, Cajun-style or with marinara, bearnaise or hollandaise sauce. Lobster? The menu lists five dishes. Surf and turf? Three, not including the night's "special" cuts topped with shellfish and bearnaise.
NEWS
By BEN WATTENBERG | June 17, 1992
We too often pay attention to the foam on the beer, not the beer in the mug. But if you want to see the future, foam-watching is the wrong way to do it. Ultimately, the foam gets absorbed into the beer, not vice versa.New 1990 Census data have recently rolled out. Key headlines stress America's changing ethnography. "Immigrant Tide Surges" is the Page 1 lead story in USA Today. Others deal with "multiculturalism," "diversity" and the record number of Americans (32 million) who speak a foreign language at home.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | April 7, 2011
James Bernard "Jimmy" Watkins Jr., a veteran Baltimore & Ohio Railroad dining car chef who during his 36-year career prepared thousands of meals for passengers, including Presidents Franklin D. Roosevelt and Harry S. Truman, died March 30 of prostate cancer at his Pikesville home. He was 89. Mr. Watkins was born in Baltimore and raised in Glen Burnie, and was a 1939 graduate of Glen Burnie High School. He began his cooking career in the late 1930s, working as a lunch counter cook at Read's drugstore at Howard and Lexington streets, and soon began looking for a better job because "they didn't pay no money," he said in a 34-page typed transcript of a taped interview made for the Hays T. Watkins Research Library at the B&O Railroad Museum in Baltimore in 2002.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | April 22, 2001
Entertaining: Sweet and pungent tastes herald spring's burst of activity. My husband and I looked at the calendar the other day and couldn't believe how hectic our spring is going to be. Three sets of out-of-town company are scheduled to arrive in the next few weeks. Friends have invited us to spend a weekend cooking with them at their nearby country farmhouse, and we are planning to give a party in honor of several seniors graduating from Amherst College, where my spouse teaches. I am looking forward to this new season, a favorite of cooks everywhere.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie | June 26, 1996
Uncomplicate food, cookbook author saysThe idea that "good food does not have to be complicated" pretty much sums up Marie Simmons' approach to cooking, and it's the underlying theme of her new book, "Fresh & Fast" (Chapters, $29.95). Recipes include mussels in white wine with fresh tomato salsa, black bean and yellow rice salad with fresh corn and tomatoes, and melon and berries with lime sugar syrup.Gadget savvyIt's probably happened to you. You buy a clever gadget, then when you get it home, you wonder which is dumber, you or the device.
FEATURES
By Dolly Merritt | February 18, 1995
Around the house* Recycle fabric-softener sheets. Place in the bottom of flower pots to cover drainage holes; staple ends to hangers to keep clothes from sliding off.* Keep steel wool soap pad inside sealed plastic bag after use. This will prevent rust and increase pad's use.* Loosen stains from carpet immediately with a drop of ice water or ice cube. This will prevent deeper staining when nothing else is handy.* Prevent soggy lettuce and vegetables when making a tossed salad. Wash, drain and prepare vegetables ahead of time.
NEWS
By ERNEST W. LEFEVER | August 3, 1993
On July 2, just before Independence Day, in Tucson, Ariz., 75 Mexican immigrants and one Peruvian, all wearing small American flags, became naturalized U.S. citizens. Nothing unusual, except that the half-hour swearing-in ceremony was conducted largely in Spanish at the request of U.S. District Judge Alfredo Marquez.This dismayed many earlier immigrants who took pride in learning the language of their adopted country, as will a new, 53-page U.S. Department of Education guide, ''Preparing Your Child for University,'' written entirely in Spanish.
NEWS
By BEN WATTENBERG | June 17, 1992
We too often pay attention to the foam on the beer, not the beer in the mug. But if you want to see the future, foam-watching is the wrong way to do it. Ultimately, the foam gets absorbed into the beer, not vice versa.New 1990 Census data have recently rolled out. Key headlines stress America's changing ethnography. "Immigrant Tide Surges" is the Page 1 lead story in USA Today. Others deal with "multiculturalism," "diversity" and the record number of Americans (32 million) who speak a foreign language at home.
FEATURES
By Mary Maushard | November 7, 1991
Mo's Fishermans' Wharf Restaurant at the Inner Harbor boasts of having one of the area's largest seafood menus. While that would be difficult to prove, it is certainly one of the biggest I have seen.The menu lists more than 20 fish, not including shellfish. They can be had broiled, fried, poached, stuffed, Cajun-style or with marinara, bearnaise or hollandaise sauce. Lobster? The menu lists five dishes. Surf and turf? Three, not including the night's "special" cuts topped with shellfish and bearnaise.
NEWS
By MARILYNN MARTER and MARILYNN MARTER,PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER | August 23, 2006
Fresh beets are a relatively new flavor sensation for most Americans. Yet a recent food-service survey and menu analysis for Kraft Foods rated beet salads second only to exotic greens among the hottest salad trends in fine restaurants. With new golden beet and exciting candy-striped beet varieties turning up more frequently at farmers' markets and specialty-food stores, more people are tasting, and loving, beets.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.