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June 15, 2002
1775: The Second Continental Congress voted unanimously to appoint George Washington head of the Continental Army. 1944: American forces began their successful invasion of Saipan during World War II. Meanwhile, B-29 Superfortresses made their first raids on Japan. Associated Press
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | April 1, 2013
Colin P. Hollingsworth, a retired bag company executive and World War II naval veteran, died Friday of respiratory failure at the Edenwald retirement community in Towson. He was 99. Mr. Hollingsworth was born and raised on a Church Hill farm that had been in his family since 1668. After graduating from Church Hill High School in 1928, he entered Washington College, where he earned a bachelor's degree in 1933. He moved to Baltimore and began his business career as an $18-a-week shipping clerk at the Grafflin Bag Co. on Philpott Street that manufactured and sold feed and flour bags made of burlap, jute and cotton.
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FEATURES
By Chicago Tribune | February 25, 1999
Asian women who work in ``America's worst sweatshop'' are suing such big-name clothing makers as Tommy Hilfiger, The Gap, The Limited, J. Crew and Wal-Mart, a lawyer for about 50,000 garment makers announced last month.The class-action suits accuse 18 U.S. manufacturers of selling garments made by workers who are mistreated by foreign subcontractors in the Pacific island of Saipan, a U.S. commonwealth. The lawsuits are the first to try to use U.S. racketeering laws to hold retailers accountable for worker conditions and seek about $1 billion in damages.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2013
William L. More, a retired Exxon marketing representative who fought during World War II with the 4th Marine Division in some of the bloodiest battles in the Pacific, died Saturday of respiratory failure at Bonnie Blink, the Maryland Masonic Home. He was 90. Nearly 40 years would pass before William Lynn More could bring himself to talk about Iwo Jima, the 36-day battle in 1945 for a rugged, uninhabited eight-square-mile Pacific island of gray volcanic sand and rock, where 6,800 Americans died and 26,000 were wounded.
NEWS
December 26, 2008
Al Meyerhoff, 61 Legal voice for poor Al Meyerhoff, a leading labor, environmental and civil rights lawyer who brought a landmark case to stop sweatshop conditions for 30,000 workers on the Pacific island of Saipan, died n Sunday in Los Angeles, where he lived. He was 61. The cause was complications of leukemia, his wife, Marcia Brandwynne, said. Meyerhoff, a loud, friendly bear of a man with a thick mane of tousled hair, rose to prominence in several legal fields. As a civil rights litigator, he successfully challenged a California law that prevented illegal immigrant children from attending public school.
NEWS
By Karen Masterson and Karen Masterson,SUN STAFF | October 4, 1997
This year, homicide detectives from the Baltimore Police Department traveled to the tropics. Sandy beaches, balmy breezes and invitations to dine with residents defined their nights. During the day they solved murders."There were two murders while I was there. A bus was carjacked, and the driver was killed, and a girl's throat was slashed," said Baltimore homicide Detective Homer Pennington, who spent most of July in Saipan.Pennington and two other officers were there as part of an exchange program with Saipan police.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 31, 2005
SAIPAN, Northern Mariana Islands - By jogging at sunset on the white sands of a palm-fringed beach here, 17-year-old Audrey O. Bricia is doing more than toning up for her next try in this island's Miss Philippines contest. She is getting in shape for U.S. Army boot camp. To gain an edge on the competition for enlistment, she reserved a seat two days in advance to take the Army's aptitude test on a recent Saturday morning. Safely ensconced in her seat, she watched an Army recruiter turn away 10 latecomers, all recent high school graduates.
NEWS
October 27, 2003
William C. Bremsteller, a Baltimore insurance salesman and executive, died of a stroke Saturday at the Homewood Retirement Center in Williamsport. The longtime Catonsville resident was 79. Born in Baltimore, Mr. Bremsteller was a 1942 graduate of Polytechnic Institute. He served in the Army during World War II, and was stationed in Saipan -- part of the Northern Mariana Islands -- and Hawaii. After the war, Mr. Bremsteller enrolled in the Johns Hopkins University's night school but dropped out after he married in 1949 and started a family.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN | June 14, 2009
I still think about Saipan because it was the worst one," recalled Samuel A. Culotta, a Baltimore lawyer and frequent Republican candidate, who spent World War II in the Pacific as a Navy corpsman. Culotta, 84, was a veteran of nine island landings that stretched from Makin Atoll to Kwaajalein, Eniwetok, Okinawa and the Philippines. The hellish memories of five days on Saipan in the Mariana Islands are as fresh as they were 65 years ago, Culotta said. He likened the June 15, 1944, invasion, to an almost "forgotten D-Day," with 3,500 Americans killed and thousands wounded.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,Sun Staff Writer | October 2, 1994
Joseph V. Eder, a Baltimore electrician who never forgot the boyhood friend who saved his life during a World War II invasion, died Thursday of cancer at his home in Eastpoint. He was 74.His World War II combat experiences resulted in a lifetime of serving veterans and their organizations for Mr. Eder, who boxed and studied law at the University of Baltimore after the war.Giving up his law studies, he became an electrician who worked in construction as a member of the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers, Local 28, until retiring in 1986.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN | June 14, 2009
I still think about Saipan because it was the worst one," recalled Samuel A. Culotta, a Baltimore lawyer and frequent Republican candidate, who spent World War II in the Pacific as a Navy corpsman. Culotta, 84, was a veteran of nine island landings that stretched from Makin Atoll to Kwaajalein, Eniwetok, Okinawa and the Philippines. The hellish memories of five days on Saipan in the Mariana Islands are as fresh as they were 65 years ago, Culotta said. He likened the June 15, 1944, invasion, to an almost "forgotten D-Day," with 3,500 Americans killed and thousands wounded.
NEWS
December 26, 2008
Al Meyerhoff, 61 Legal voice for poor Al Meyerhoff, a leading labor, environmental and civil rights lawyer who brought a landmark case to stop sweatshop conditions for 30,000 workers on the Pacific island of Saipan, died n Sunday in Los Angeles, where he lived. He was 61. The cause was complications of leukemia, his wife, Marcia Brandwynne, said. Meyerhoff, a loud, friendly bear of a man with a thick mane of tousled hair, rose to prominence in several legal fields. As a civil rights litigator, he successfully challenged a California law that prevented illegal immigrant children from attending public school.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 31, 2005
SAIPAN, Northern Mariana Islands - By jogging at sunset on the white sands of a palm-fringed beach here, 17-year-old Audrey O. Bricia is doing more than toning up for her next try in this island's Miss Philippines contest. She is getting in shape for U.S. Army boot camp. To gain an edge on the competition for enlistment, she reserved a seat two days in advance to take the Army's aptitude test on a recent Saturday morning. Safely ensconced in her seat, she watched an Army recruiter turn away 10 latecomers, all recent high school graduates.
NEWS
October 27, 2003
William C. Bremsteller, a Baltimore insurance salesman and executive, died of a stroke Saturday at the Homewood Retirement Center in Williamsport. The longtime Catonsville resident was 79. Born in Baltimore, Mr. Bremsteller was a 1942 graduate of Polytechnic Institute. He served in the Army during World War II, and was stationed in Saipan -- part of the Northern Mariana Islands -- and Hawaii. After the war, Mr. Bremsteller enrolled in the Johns Hopkins University's night school but dropped out after he married in 1949 and started a family.
FEATURES
June 15, 2002
1775: The Second Continental Congress voted unanimously to appoint George Washington head of the Continental Army. 1944: American forces began their successful invasion of Saipan during World War II. Meanwhile, B-29 Superfortresses made their first raids on Japan. Associated Press
FEATURES
By Chicago Tribune | February 25, 1999
Asian women who work in ``America's worst sweatshop'' are suing such big-name clothing makers as Tommy Hilfiger, The Gap, The Limited, J. Crew and Wal-Mart, a lawyer for about 50,000 garment makers announced last month.The class-action suits accuse 18 U.S. manufacturers of selling garments made by workers who are mistreated by foreign subcontractors in the Pacific island of Saipan, a U.S. commonwealth. The lawsuits are the first to try to use U.S. racketeering laws to hold retailers accountable for worker conditions and seek about $1 billion in damages.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | April 1, 2013
Colin P. Hollingsworth, a retired bag company executive and World War II naval veteran, died Friday of respiratory failure at the Edenwald retirement community in Towson. He was 99. Mr. Hollingsworth was born and raised on a Church Hill farm that had been in his family since 1668. After graduating from Church Hill High School in 1928, he entered Washington College, where he earned a bachelor's degree in 1933. He moved to Baltimore and began his business career as an $18-a-week shipping clerk at the Grafflin Bag Co. on Philpott Street that manufactured and sold feed and flour bags made of burlap, jute and cotton.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2013
William L. More, a retired Exxon marketing representative who fought during World War II with the 4th Marine Division in some of the bloodiest battles in the Pacific, died Saturday of respiratory failure at Bonnie Blink, the Maryland Masonic Home. He was 90. Nearly 40 years would pass before William Lynn More could bring himself to talk about Iwo Jima, the 36-day battle in 1945 for a rugged, uninhabited eight-square-mile Pacific island of gray volcanic sand and rock, where 6,800 Americans died and 26,000 were wounded.
NEWS
By Karen Masterson and Karen Masterson,SUN STAFF | October 4, 1997
This year, homicide detectives from the Baltimore Police Department traveled to the tropics. Sandy beaches, balmy breezes and invitations to dine with residents defined their nights. During the day they solved murders."There were two murders while I was there. A bus was carjacked, and the driver was killed, and a girl's throat was slashed," said Baltimore homicide Detective Homer Pennington, who spent most of July in Saipan.Pennington and two other officers were there as part of an exchange program with Saipan police.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,Sun Staff Writer | October 2, 1994
Joseph V. Eder, a Baltimore electrician who never forgot the boyhood friend who saved his life during a World War II invasion, died Thursday of cancer at his home in Eastpoint. He was 74.His World War II combat experiences resulted in a lifetime of serving veterans and their organizations for Mr. Eder, who boxed and studied law at the University of Baltimore after the war.Giving up his law studies, he became an electrician who worked in construction as a member of the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers, Local 28, until retiring in 1986.
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