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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 28, 2006
KRAKOW, Poland -- "I am still alive," Pope John Paul II, then 79 and already ill for years, mused on his last trip to his hometown in 1999. Yesterday, his successor, Pope Benedict XVI, suggested again that Poland's favorite son would live on as a saint, telling pilgrims at a shrine that he hoped it would happen soon. The new pope's impromptu remarks drew wild applause from about 15,000 people - some holding signs saying, "Sainthood now!" - who had gathered to see Benedict on the third day of a pilgrimage to the places that shaped the life of Pope John Paul, who died in April 2005.
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NEWS
April 28, 2014
The pending sainthood of Pope John Paul II and Pope John XXIII may be a bit rushed ( "St. Pius X parishioners recall role in visit of Pope John Paul II," April 23). Both were allegedly cognizant that under their tenure there were heinous sexual crimes supposedly committed by men of the cloth, men of the Roman Catholic Church, in parishes around the world. This is a plea from a former Roman Catholic for the Vatican to become transparent in a time when anything less is simply unacceptable.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 19, 1999
NEW YORK -- Archbishop Fulton J. Sheen, whose television ministry in the 1950s reached 25 million viewers -- more viewers than Milton Berle had -- and made him the most prominent spokesman of the Roman Catholic Church in America, could become a candidate for sainthood under a process begun by a Franciscan friar he inspired as a boy.The Rev. Andrew Apostoli, 56, a friar at St. Felix Friary in Yonkers, N.Y., has received permission from Cardinal John O'Connor...
NEWS
April 30, 2013
Why don't we put Bill Clinton up for sainthood ("Misoverestimated Bush," April 28)? After all, his economic record was to be revered. Too bad he couldn't keep his pants on in the White House. If any public or private education senior staff acted in the same way, there would have been an immediate cry for dismissal and disciplinary action. Once again, the media glorifies the thugs who continue to commit various acts of immaturity and politicians who continue to laud their own plaudits.
NEWS
By Patrick Ercolano and Patrick Ercolano,Evening Sun Staff | April 25, 1991
Baltimore's Roman Catholic archdiocese has begun petitioning the Vatican for the canonization of Elizabeth Lange, a founder of the Oblate Sisters of Providence, the first Catholic order of black nuns.This Sunday at the Oblates' mother house in Catonsville, Archbishop William Keeler will announce that Rome has permitted the archdiocese to start making its case for the sainthood of the Cuban-born nun, whose religious title was Mother Mary Elizabeth Lange."We want to stress that this is a very preliminary stage of the process," says the Rev. William Au, a spokesman for the archdiocese.
NEWS
By Christine Spolar and Christine Spolar,Chicago Tribune | March 25, 2007
ROME -- In life, Pope John Paul II moved crowds like a rock star. Now a cadre of theologians, cardinals and medical doctors from the Vatican will determine if the late pontiff should soar to the level of sainthood. A third-floor office that overlooks St. Peter's Square, which echoed in April 2005 with funeral prayers for the former Karol Wojtyla, is where the decision will be weighed. By April 2, all documents on the spiritual life and times of the Polish pope will be carted into the rarefied sanctum of the Congregation for the Causes of Saints.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | September 12, 1997
In the week since Mother Teresa's death, Roman Catholics have begun discussing whether she should be declared a saint. Even normally cautious clerics have joined in: "I personally would canonize her tomorrow," says Cardinal John J. O'Connor of New York. "I think she is a saint in heaven."But who determines saintliness?The idea of sainthood is nearly as old as Christianity, beginning with the contemporaries of Jesus -- the Apostles and martyrs, the Christians who gave their lives for their faith during the LTC Roman persecutions.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ray Holton and Ray Holton,Special to the Sun | November 30, 2003
A Saint, More or Less, by Henry Grunwald. Random House. 236 pages. $23.95. In the quarter-century reign of Pope John Paul II, admission to sainthood appears to be a tool aimed at energizing the world's 900 million Roman Catholics. He has recognized more than 470 saints and proclaimed more than 1,300 other candidates for sainthood in beatification ceremonies. Along the way to breaking the records of all previous popes in the saint-naming business, Pope John Paul has changed some of the rules.
NEWS
April 28, 2014
The pending sainthood of Pope John Paul II and Pope John XXIII may be a bit rushed ( "St. Pius X parishioners recall role in visit of Pope John Paul II," April 23). Both were allegedly cognizant that under their tenure there were heinous sexual crimes supposedly committed by men of the cloth, men of the Roman Catholic Church, in parishes around the world. This is a plea from a former Roman Catholic for the Vatican to become transparent in a time when anything less is simply unacceptable.
NEWS
April 30, 2013
Why don't we put Bill Clinton up for sainthood ("Misoverestimated Bush," April 28)? After all, his economic record was to be revered. Too bad he couldn't keep his pants on in the White House. If any public or private education senior staff acted in the same way, there would have been an immediate cry for dismissal and disciplinary action. Once again, the media glorifies the thugs who continue to commit various acts of immaturity and politicians who continue to laud their own plaudits.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2012
The Rev. John Wesley Bowen, a Roman Catholic priest and church historian who advocated sainthood for a 19th-century Baltimore woman, died of pneumonia Sunday at St. Agnes Hospital. He was 87 and lived in Catonsville. Born in Baltimore and raised on Linden Avenue, he attended Mount St. Joseph High School before entering the old St. Charles College, a seminary. He earned degrees in philosophy and theology at St. Mary's Seminary and the Catholic University of America, where he also earned a second master's degree.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2011
With prayers, processions and Polish food, Roman Catholics in Baltimore joined millions of other church members worldwide Sunday in celebrating the life of the late Pope John Paul II — the only pontiff to have visited the city — as he moved a step closer to sainthood. Archbishop Edwin F. O'Brien, head of the Archdiocese of Baltimore, presided over a Mass at the Basilica of the Assumption marking the Sunday after Easter as well as the beatification in Rome of John Paul II. Then, after the Mass, the archbishop led a procession around the block to a "peace" garden dedicated to the late pope for an outdoor prayer service there.
NEWS
By Christine Spolar and Christine Spolar,Chicago Tribune | March 25, 2007
ROME -- In life, Pope John Paul II moved crowds like a rock star. Now a cadre of theologians, cardinals and medical doctors from the Vatican will determine if the late pontiff should soar to the level of sainthood. A third-floor office that overlooks St. Peter's Square, which echoed in April 2005 with funeral prayers for the former Karol Wojtyla, is where the decision will be weighed. By April 2, all documents on the spiritual life and times of the Polish pope will be carted into the rarefied sanctum of the Congregation for the Causes of Saints.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 28, 2006
KRAKOW, Poland -- "I am still alive," Pope John Paul II, then 79 and already ill for years, mused on his last trip to his hometown in 1999. Yesterday, his successor, Pope Benedict XVI, suggested again that Poland's favorite son would live on as a saint, telling pilgrims at a shrine that he hoped it would happen soon. The new pope's impromptu remarks drew wild applause from about 15,000 people - some holding signs saying, "Sainthood now!" - who had gathered to see Benedict on the third day of a pilgrimage to the places that shaped the life of Pope John Paul, who died in April 2005.
TOPIC
By Larry Williams and Larry Williams,PERSPECTIVE EDITOR | May 15, 2005
In his more than 26 years as pope, John Paul II made saints out of 484 men and women, more than all his predecessors combined. Along the way, he created 1,338 blesseds - individuals who were deemed responsible for at least one miracle. Now, Pope Benedict XVI says he has decided to put his predecessor on the fast track toward becoming a saint himself, bypassing church rules that would have required a five-year wait before beginning the complicated process that leads to a formal declaration of sainthood in the Roman Catholic Church.
NEWS
By Janice D'Arcy and Janice D'Arcy,SUN STAFF | May 14, 2005
Pope Benedict XVI selected yesterday a San Francisco bishop with a reputation as a conservative theologian to take over his former job - one of the most powerful in the Catholic hierarchy and instrumental in shaping the direction of the church. Archbishop William J. Levada will become the church's highest-ranking American cleric in history when he moves to Vatican City to become the guardian of Catholic doctrine as the prefect for the Congregation of the Doctrine of the Faith. Levada is a friend and intellectual ally of the new pope, and his appointment is a clear signal that Pope Benedict plans to maintain a tightly focused notion of Catholic teaching throughout the world church.
FEATURES
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN STAFF | February 25, 2000
Who knew? Who could have guessed that an ordinary guy like Ed Harris would have the acting chops to take an otherwise run-of-the-mill film like "The Third Miracle," opening today at the Charles, and make it quite entertaining? Well, if you've been paying attention, Harris' gifts have been increasingly apparent. He's captured Oscar and Golden Globe nominations for his roles in "The Truman Show" (1998) and "Apollo 13," (1995) after all, and he even managed to make a sorry film like "Milk Money" (1994)
NEWS
By John Plunkett | January 20, 1992
MAKING SAINTS: HOW THE CATHOLIC CHURCH DETERMINES WHO BECOMES A SAINT, WHO DOESN'T, AND WHY. By Kenneth L. Woodward. Simon & Schuster. 464 pages. $12.ALTHOUGH ALL world religions have some concept of sainthood, only the Roman Catholic Church has a formal, continuous and highly rationalized process for "making saints," according to author Kenneth Woodward in this scholarly examination of canonization.Identifying the singularly holy has taken various forms since the time of the first Christian martyrs.
NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 9, 2005
VATICAN CITY - Presidents and the poor, royalty and the ruled gathered yesterday in St. Peter's Square and the great piazzas of Rome for the funeral of Pope John Paul II, whose death attracted one of the largest religious gatherings in modern times for a tearful - and at times joyful - goodbye. As winds blew across the vast cobblestone square, the giant bell of the basilica tolled slowly, a mournful sound suitable for announcing funerals, though no mourners needed to be called. Already, more than 300,000 people were gathered on the square.
NEWS
By Tracy Wilkinson and Tracy Wilkinson,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 4, 2004
VATICAN CITY - The 19th-century mystic nun who inspired some of the more controversial scenes of Mel Gibson's hit movie The Passion of the Christ was beatified yesterday by Pope John Paul II. Beatification is the last formal step before a person is elevated to sainthood. In addition to Sister Anne Catherine Emmerich, a German nun known for her purported visions of Jesus' crucifixion, the pope beatified the last reigning emperor of Austria, two French priests and an Italian nun. The ailing 84-year-old pontiff, whose schedule has been greatly curtailed as he marks his 26th year in the papacy this month, struggled to deliver yesterday's homily.
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