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Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2014
More than thirty vessels - tall ships, naval vessels and others - will be visiting Baltimore Wednesday through Sunday for Star-Spangled Spectacular, the bicentennial celebration of the national anthem. And where there are ships, there are hungry, thirsty sailors. Some 50 Baltimore restaurants are offering discounts to visiting sailors and crew members as part of a “Sailors Welcome Here” program, which is is being administered through Sail Baltimore, the non-profit organization responsible for the visiting ships and the crew hospitality for the Star-Spangled Spectacular ships.
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By Marie Marciano Gullard and For The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
The rigor required to create a Nantucket lightship basket puts the lie to any cheap jokes about learning the craft. “If these baskets are made perfectly,” says Leslie Goldsmith, “they should be able to hold water.” Consumers today associate the baskets “with the oval purses and a lid,” Goldsmith says. But she and her fellow weavers in the Nantucket Basket Guild are drawn to the historical legacy and precision of the craft. “These baskets are made the same way sailors made them in the 1800s,” she says.
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NEWS
November 7, 2011
I started reading Matthew Brown's article on atheists "A belief in service to country, without a belief in a deity" (Nov. 6) because of my background in the military. I found it interesting until I read this: "Nightly prayers still are broadcast throughout Navy ships at sea. " In my years on USS Ranger and USS Kittyhawk, I saw many programs available through the closed circuit armed forces TV system aboard ship. Never did I see nightly prayers broadcast in the ready rooms or on the mess decks (public areas)
ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2014
More than thirty vessels - tall ships, naval vessels and others - will be visiting Baltimore Wednesday through Sunday for Star-Spangled Spectacular, the bicentennial celebration of the national anthem. And where there are ships, there are hungry, thirsty sailors. Some 50 Baltimore restaurants are offering discounts to visiting sailors and crew members as part of a “Sailors Welcome Here” program, which is is being administered through Sail Baltimore, the non-profit organization responsible for the visiting ships and the crew hospitality for the Star-Spangled Spectacular ships.
SPORTS
By From Sun staff reports | May 1, 2010
Amy Ator hit an RBI single in the bottom of the seventh inning to drive in MacKenzie Fitzgerald with the winning run as the No. 5 C. Milton Wright softball team beat visiting No. 12 Mount de Sales, 2-1, on Saturday. The Mustangs (16-1) took a 1-0 lead in the third inning. Jessica Canami walked, stole second and scored on an RBI double by Lindsay Kuczak. It was the only earned run of the game. The Sailors (10-7) knotted the score in the top of the seventh as pitcher Holly Whitehead scored.
SPORTS
By Baltimore Sun reporter | April 26, 2010
More than 1,000 sailors and 200 boats will compete this weekend in the National Offshore One Design regatta in Annapolis. Annapolis, which is the third of nine stops this season, has been a part of the NOOD regatta since 1999. Sixteen fleets will compete this weekend for a chance to sail in the NOOD Championship in the British Virgin Islands in November. The three-day event has multiple races each day, from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. on Friday and Saturday, and from 10 a.m. until 2:30 p.m. Sunday.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | August 20, 2011
Pieter Schneider's research and planning paid off every time his boat hit the finish line. The 7-year-old had studied pictures of fast boats in magazines to design his catamaran, made of four aluminum cans and two plastic cups, with a paper plate sail. His model took first place in the Root Beer class of the Chesapeake Outdoor Group's 12 oz. Regatta Saturday. The fundraiser, held at the Port Annapolis Marina, drew more than 40 racers Saturday who had designed sailboats using 12-ounce cans — Budweiser or Bud Light for adults, and root beer for anyone below legal drinking age. The event, which has run for eight years and raised thousands of dollars for local charities, grew out of a serendipitous moment during an Outer Banks vacation.
NEWS
May 26, 2005
On May 19, 2005, NORMAN HAROLD SAILORS, beloved partner and best friend of Roxane Hooper, long time friend of Fred Sirody, former husband of 34 years to Grace Broening Sailors, father of Celeste Huff, Derek Sailors, Mark Sailors and Kyle Hewson. Also survived by seven grandchildren. Time of memorial and celebration of Norman's life will be held at his home, 20 N. Wolfe Street on Friday, May 27, 2 to 5 P.M.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | June 15, 2012
It didn't take Canadian seaman Richard Thompson long to get quite a bit of Baltimore under his shiny gold belt. Tapas at Harborplace. Shopping for sunglasses. And a beery romp with some American sailors at Power Plant Live that left him with a different sort of souvenir. "It was a mechanical bull," said the crewman from the frigate Ville de Quebec, pointing to a fresh bruise on his lip. "In case you're wondering. " Thanks to this week's Sailabration commemorating the War of 1812, Baltimore is getting a taste of Fleet Week - and some of its legendary exuberance.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | November 1, 2011
For the American sailors off Tripoli - five of them from Maryland - it was a suicide mission: Sail the small ship heavy with explosives in among the enemy fleet, set the blast to go off in 15 minutes, jump into lifeboats and get as far away as possible. The crew of the Intrepid would never make it. The fireship ignited early, killing all 13 men aboard. The bodies washed ashore, to be fed on by dogs and dragged through the streets of Tripoli. They eventually would be buried in a pair of sites.
SPORTS
From Sun staff reports | June 21, 2014
For midshipman Duncan Mamer, the skipper of a Navy 44, the waiting was the hardest part of the 19th biennial Annapolis-Bermuda Race. "The prevailing conditions for this race were mostly just lots and lots of light air," said Mamer, a Caldwell, Iowa, resident and rising senior on the Naval Academy's varsity offshore sailing team. "Whether it was on the Chesapeake [Bay] or half an hour from the finish line, we definitely spent our fair share of time drifting around. "The biggest challenge was definitely just always trying to keep the boat moving.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 28, 2014
Patricia S. "Patty" Farber, a former private school art teacher and volunteer who climbed Mount Kilimanjaro when she was in her 60s, died May 10 of lung cancer at her home in Brewster, Mass. The longtime Towson resident was 87. "We got to know the Farbers through the Gilman School connection because our kids were there, and we did a lot of things together," said Richard W. Sunderland, a longtime close friend of Mrs. Farber and her husband. "Patty was a wonderful person and so full of life.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | May 12, 2014
Mary Bracken Neale, a retired natal intensive care nurse and ocean sailor, died of cancer May 10 at Gilchrist Hospice Care. The Towson resident was 74. Born Mary Elizabeth Bracken in Baltimore and raised on Atwood Road, she was the daughter of Thomas Bracken, a National Labor Relations Board attorney, and Adeline Ogier Bracken, an award-winning athlete and graduate of what is now Notre Dame of Maryland University. Mrs. Neale attended St. Mary's of the Assumption School in Govans and was a 1958 graduate of Maryvale Preparatory School.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2014
- The Navy will award its highest non-combat decoration for heroism Friday to a Hagerstown sailor killed last month in a shooting in Norfolk, Va., officials said. Petty Officer 2nd Class Mark A. Mayo, who was assigned to Naval Security Forces at Naval Station Norfolk, was shielding a sailor from a civilian truck driver who had taken her gun during the March 24 confrontation aboard the destroyer USS Mahan, officials said. Mayo was 24. Jeffrey Tyrone Savage shot Mayo, officials said.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2014
Having circumnavigated the Americas on his own, Annapolis-based sailor Matt Rutherford has turned his attention to researching plastics' effects on environment Matt Rutherford is more comfortable on water than he is on land. As he sat recently for an interview at the U.S. Sailing Hall of Fame in Annapolis, Rutherford was clearly eager to get the next expedition for his Ocean Research Project underway. Talk about having cabin fever: Rutherford spent much of the winter cooped up in the same 42-foot steel schooner on which he and marine biologist Nicole Trenholm sailed to the Azores last summer to research the effects plastics have on the North Atlantic Gyre, one of the world's five major ocean current systems.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | December 17, 2013
Patricia H. Grymes, a homemaker and an avid Chesapeake Bay sailor, died Dec. 11 of cancer at her Towson home. She was 85. The daughter of Urban Smith Holden, a Baltimore & Ohio Railroad civil engineer, and Dorothea Boyer Holden, a homemaker, the former Patricia Ann Holden was born in Cincinnati. She moved to Baltimore's Hunting Ridge neighborhood when the B&O transferred her father to Baltimore. After graduating in 1947 from Western High School, she took a job as a sales associate at the old Hochschild Kohn & Co. department store.
NEWS
By ANNIE LINSKEY and ANNIE LINSKEY,SUN REPORTER | February 12, 2006
Those who think the sport of sailing is code for floating around the bay and drinking beers during the day ought to talk to Harry Legum. For 18 years, Legum has been tailoring fitness programs for Annapolis sailors. He works with America's Cup racers, junior sailors, Naval Academy midshipmen and casual day sailors. Next month he plans to restart a sailing fitness class at the Annapolis Athletic Club. "When you're sailing, you have to move quickly," said Legum, 41. "You have to explosively get up and start performing.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2013
After months of investigation, military authorities charged four sailors Wednesday in the deaths of two Navy divers at the "Super Pond" at Aberdeen Proving Ground. Chief Warrant Officer 3rd Class Jason M. Bennett, Senior Chief Navy Diver James C. Burger, Senior Chief Navy Diver David C. Jones and Chief Navy Diver Gary G. Ladd Jr. were charged with dereliction of duty in the deaths of Diver 1st Class James Reyher, 29, and Diver 2nd Class Ryan Harris, 22. The divers and the defendants were members of the elite Mobile Salvage and Diving Unit 2, based in Virginia Beach, Va. The charges were the first to be brought in the deaths of Reyher and Harris.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2013
Kenneth Graeme Menzies, a retired Gilman School teacher and lacrosse coach, died of complications from an infection Sept. 1 at Anne Arundel Medical Center. The Stevensville resident was 84. Born in Baltimore, he was the son of John T. Menzies, the London-born president of Crosse & Blackwell, a food processing firm that once made orange marmalade and other products at its Baltimore plant. His mother was Hilda May Ranson, a homemaker. They family lived at Braeside off Broadway Road in Baltimore County.
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