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TRAVEL
By Gary A. Warner and Gary A. Warner,The Orange County (Calif.) Register | October 22, 2006
Monday morning, the moment of truth. The passengers of the Yankee Clipper climb up on the deck of a former millionaire's yacht and squint into their first sunrise. The deck is pitched at a 20-degree angle as the schooner carves through the waves of the south Caribbean north of Grenada, its sails rattling and lines groaning against the masts. There are those passengers who are wide-eyed and smiling, the breeze in their hair, ecstatic at being at sea under sail. Then there are those who realize they have signed on for a week sleeping in a windowless broom closet that heaves, creaks and shudders.
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NEWS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2012
ABOARD THE COAST GUARD CUTTER SLEDGE — The party's over. Just after dawn Tuesday, the naval vessels, with hulls as gray as the morning, slipped from their berths and headed for open water. Later, as the sun broke through, the stars of Sailabration — the tall ships — gathered up their good-time vibe, unfurled their sails and followed the same path. Maryland's Star-Spangled commemoration of the War of 1812 ended Tuesday morning after a week filled with fireworks, screaming jets and hundreds of thousands of visitors to the Inner Harbor, Fells Point and Fort McHenry.
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NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN STAFF | June 21, 2000
NORFOLK, Va. - In majestic procession, the tall ships left this naval port yesterday to send Operation Sail 2000 on its way to its next stop: Baltimore. The 31 sailing ships that will turn Baltimore harbor into a municipality of masts will start arriving in the Inner Harbor today. The first three are expected to dock before noon. They are the Guayas, a 258-foot barque from Ecuador; Italy's 331-foot, full-rigged Amerigo Vespucci; and the 191-foot Indonesian barquentine Dewaruci. The fleet will be docked around the city waterfront, from the Inner Harbor west wall along the piers, at Fells Point and out to Locust Point and Canton.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | June 14, 2012
It sure doesn't look like the other vessels docked in Annapolis. The Bounty, a wooden movie-star ship with its tallest mast at 115 feet, is in town for a long weekend of tours that ends Sunday. The visit, like the Star-Spangled Sailabration in Baltimore this weekend, commemorates the War of 1812. The original Bounty's storied mutiny occurred in 1789, and both the war and mutiny hark back to the era when sailing ships ruled the seas. This ship was built for the 1962 movie "Mutiny on the Bounty," starring Marlon Brando as Fletcher Christian, leader of the historical mutiny in Tahiti against Capt.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun reporter | February 2, 2008
John Rush Crunkleton Jr., a retired bedding company executive who loved the sea and its sailing ships, died of multiple organ failure Tuesday at St. Joseph Medical Center. He was 89. Mr. Crunkleton was born in Baltimore and raised in Homeland and at a summer home on the Magothy River. He was a 1936 graduate of Polytechnic Institute. He attended the Johns Hopkins University until enlisting in the naval reserve in 1940. "He was sent to Guantanamo Bay in Cuba as a member of the naval cavalry.
NEWS
By RICHARD E. ISRAEL | March 30, 2008
The history of recreational sailing and yacht racing is an important part of the maritime history of Annapolis. However, it should be told in the context of the broader role of vessels under sail. It was sailing ships that brought the European settlers to a new life of hope and opportunity. It was ships that brought Africans to a life of slavery. It was sailing ships that enabled Marylanders to prosper in trade with other colonies and with England during the Colonial era and in trade with other states of the union and countries around the world after achieving independence as the United States.
NEWS
June 20, 1992
FREE SOUNDS: Stop by the Inner Harbor's Amphitheater between Harborplace's pavilions at 5 o'clock this evening and hear some live music -- free. The group is called Cry Monday, and specializes in old and new favorites. The concert will end at 7 p.m. It's part of the Beefeater Cool Summer Sounds concert series on Saturday evenings in June.* On Thursday, forget those Cosby reruns and get to Hopkins Plaza for another free concert. Upbeat jazz played by Global Function is the attraction of tonight's 7 o'clock gig -- part of the La Provence Thursday Night Concert Series.
FEATURES
March 22, 1992
Heritage centers part of Irish festivalIt's a year to go home to Ireland. For those with roots in the Emerald Isle, there isn't a better year to head for Ireland:The Irish Homecoming Festival will be celebrated in September.From Cork in the south to Donegal in the north, there not only are major events and clan gatherings planned, but also Irish heritage centers for people who want to trace their roots.And no matter if you are an O'Flynn, Rafferty, Keating or McCarthy, there will be a clan gathering for you in September.
NEWS
By Joetta M. Cramm and Joetta M. Cramm,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 20, 2001
Elk Ridge Landing in the early 1700s became a busy tobacco shipping port. The Patapsco River was about 15 feet deep, readily accommodating the sailing ships of the day. Along with tobacco, iron became an important export product at the Landing. The era of the iron industry began with a 1743 patent (a document proving ownership) for a 6 1/2 -acre property called "Caleb and Edward's Friendship." The land, patented by a Caleb Dorsey, would become an iron furnace. At the Maryland State Archives in Annapolis are "journals," or ledgers, from Caleb Dorsey Jr.'s store, dated 1758-1772.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2012
ABOARD THE COAST GUARD CUTTER SLEDGE — The party's over. Just after dawn Tuesday, the naval vessels, with hulls as gray as the morning, slipped from their berths and headed for open water. Later, as the sun broke through, the stars of Sailabration — the tall ships — gathered up their good-time vibe, unfurled their sails and followed the same path. Maryland's Star-Spangled commemoration of the War of 1812 ended Tuesday morning after a week filled with fireworks, screaming jets and hundreds of thousands of visitors to the Inner Harbor, Fells Point and Fort McHenry.
NEWS
By RICHARD E. ISRAEL | March 30, 2008
The history of recreational sailing and yacht racing is an important part of the maritime history of Annapolis. However, it should be told in the context of the broader role of vessels under sail. It was sailing ships that brought the European settlers to a new life of hope and opportunity. It was ships that brought Africans to a life of slavery. It was sailing ships that enabled Marylanders to prosper in trade with other colonies and with England during the Colonial era and in trade with other states of the union and countries around the world after achieving independence as the United States.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun reporter | February 2, 2008
John Rush Crunkleton Jr., a retired bedding company executive who loved the sea and its sailing ships, died of multiple organ failure Tuesday at St. Joseph Medical Center. He was 89. Mr. Crunkleton was born in Baltimore and raised in Homeland and at a summer home on the Magothy River. He was a 1936 graduate of Polytechnic Institute. He attended the Johns Hopkins University until enlisting in the naval reserve in 1940. "He was sent to Guantanamo Bay in Cuba as a member of the naval cavalry.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun reporter | January 27, 2008
For more than 50 years after it was first launched, the USS Forrest Sherman has traveled the world, fought in Cold War battles, twice escaped the scrapheap and narrowly avoided being scuttled. Now its fate rests with the Havre de Grace City Council. The Harford County city on the Susquehanna River is considering a proposal that would give the destroyer - the prototype for naval destroyers today - a second life as a museum and tourist attraction, berthed at a pier that would be built at the city dock.
TRAVEL
By Gary A. Warner and Gary A. Warner,The Orange County (Calif.) Register | October 22, 2006
Monday morning, the moment of truth. The passengers of the Yankee Clipper climb up on the deck of a former millionaire's yacht and squint into their first sunrise. The deck is pitched at a 20-degree angle as the schooner carves through the waves of the south Caribbean north of Grenada, its sails rattling and lines groaning against the masts. There are those passengers who are wide-eyed and smiling, the breeze in their hair, ecstatic at being at sea under sail. Then there are those who realize they have signed on for a week sleeping in a windowless broom closet that heaves, creaks and shudders.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | June 30, 2004
Ron Krieger was savoring the harbor view from his downtown Baltimore hotel yesterday morning when a tall-masted ship glided into the picture. The sight of the Brazilian Cisne Branco, white and graceful like its namesake (white swan), captivated the tourist from Florida. The tall ship and six others from as far as Romania are sailing into the Inner Harbor and Fells Point this week, where they are expected to provide an inviting centerpiece to mark the start of what tourism officials hope will be a banner summer for visitors.
BUSINESS
By CHARLES JAFFE | April 27, 2003
IN HIS book What About Mutual Funds? author John A. Straley recalls a panel discussion at a Mutual Fund Dealers' Conference in which a member of the media asked: "Does a decline in the securities markets mean that you face a difficult public relations job?" The answer, which Straley says brought applause from the audience, was: "No. If the investor understands what he owns, after a declining market, his feeling will be, 'Yes, my shares are lower in price, but I know that the management of my fund, with the same amount of money over the same period of time, has done a great deal better job for me than I could have done for myself."
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff writer | October 23, 1991
When asked what they know about Christopher Columbus, seventh-grade students in Pam Monacelli's social studies class at Sykesville MiddleSchool offer a flurry of answers.They can, of course, name the Italian sea captain's three sailing ships -- the Nina, Pinta and SantaMaria -- recite dates, point to the pertinent geographical locationsand tell you what the explorer was looking for.But these students also will tell you that Columbus' meeting witha new culture had a profound impact on American Indians.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff writer | December 15, 1991
Long after Christopher Columbus sailed from the classroom lessons of most Carroll students, seventh-graders at New Windsor Middle School remained engulfed in books, magazines and videos about the Italian explorer.The students -- 117 of them -- spent several weeks researching and writing individual biographical reports on Columbus and thengrouped together to tackle more in-depth projects relating to his discovery of the New World."I think this was the first time most of them were involved in a project of this size and magnitude," said Alan Powers, a seventh-grade social studies teacher.
NEWS
By Joetta M. Cramm and Joetta M. Cramm,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 20, 2001
Elk Ridge Landing in the early 1700s became a busy tobacco shipping port. The Patapsco River was about 15 feet deep, readily accommodating the sailing ships of the day. Along with tobacco, iron became an important export product at the Landing. The era of the iron industry began with a 1743 patent (a document proving ownership) for a 6 1/2 -acre property called "Caleb and Edward's Friendship." The land, patented by a Caleb Dorsey, would become an iron furnace. At the Maryland State Archives in Annapolis are "journals," or ledgers, from Caleb Dorsey Jr.'s store, dated 1758-1772.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN STAFF | June 21, 2000
NORFOLK, Va. - In majestic procession, the tall ships left this naval port yesterday to send Operation Sail 2000 on its way to its next stop: Baltimore. The 31 sailing ships that will turn Baltimore harbor into a municipality of masts will start arriving in the Inner Harbor today. The first three are expected to dock before noon. They are the Guayas, a 258-foot barque from Ecuador; Italy's 331-foot, full-rigged Amerigo Vespucci; and the 191-foot Indonesian barquentine Dewaruci. The fleet will be docked around the city waterfront, from the Inner Harbor west wall along the piers, at Fells Point and out to Locust Point and Canton.
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