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By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | August 9, 2001
Saigon, at 3345 Belair Road, gets high marks in the latest Zagat Survey for "phenomenal pho," "great value" and "warm family" atmosphere. Unfortunately, by the time the survey was published, the Vietnamese family who owned it had sold the place. Last week, they opened a new, larger restaurant, Saigon Remembered, at 5857 York Road. It's located where the Empire Cafe used to be, across from the Senator Theater. The menu has expanded, with a range of authentic Vietnamese dishes like noodle soups (pho)
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Meekah Hopkins and For The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2014
It sounds like the start of a bad joke: "One time in Vietnam, I had the best margarita. " Wait, what? No, but seriously, at Saigon Today in Canton, I found an unexpectedly delicious South of the Border gem hidden among the specialty cocktails: the Cinnamon Margarita. When Saigon opened this summer (in the spot formerly occupied by Yellow Dog Tavern), I was pretty pumped. Not only is it hard to find really good pho (a Vietnamese noodle soup) in Baltimore, it's just difficult to find an Asian restaurant that serves anything beyond imported beers and wine.
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By New York Times News Service | March 27, 1992
NEW YORK -- Cameron Mackintosh, producer of "Miss Saigon," has acknowledged buying unsold seats to the musical during the January-February attendance slump.By making such purchases he could maintain the perception that it was the only new musical of the past two seasons to sell out consistently, when, in fact, there were periodically empty seats.Although Mr. Mackintosh would not confirm figures, members of the theater staff estimate he bought between 10 and 120 seats at various performances.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2013
Theater-goers who have been pining for a revival of "Miss Saigon," the musical that gave the creators of "Les Miserables" a follow-up hit that ran for a decade in London and New York, will be happy to know that Signature Theatre has obliged. For anyone wondering why a great company would pour so much energy and resources into a work of such epic banality, this new, intermittently impressive production is a little less thrilling. We naysayers appear to be in a minority, I hasten to add. Even before last weekend's official opening, the run was extended.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large | August 18, 1995
What may be Baltimore's most authentic Vietnamese restaurant yet has just opened -- authentic in the sense that the owner and chef are both Vietnamese natives, and other Asian cuisines are only a small part of the menu. The Saigon, at 3345 Belair Road, is the place to go for specialties like "grilled shrimp on sugar cane stick" and "chicken black mushroom ginger with special steamed rice served in a clay pot."* Check out the current issue of Bon Appetit. The gourmet food magazine names Haussner's as one of the top 20 ethnic restaurants in the country (for its German fare)
NEWS
By ANDREW LAM | January 27, 1993
Saigon.-- Saigon, or Ho Chi Minh City as the Vietnamese government still calls it, remembered by many American soldiers as a city of sellers and neon, a prostitute of a city, is becoming the true capital of Vietnam. Defeated by Hanoi, her stern older brother to the north, Saigon now turns her wartime blemishes -- her army of prostitutes, black marketeers, pickpockets and scavengers -- into marks of survival.On a Saigon street a high school drop-out turned food vendor gives his customers sweet rice wrapped in a piece of bitter irony: The paper wrapper is an ink-stained, unfinished school essay describing Uncle Ho's achievements -- Ho's bright road to socialism which now seems headed to a twisted conclusion.
NEWS
By ANN LOLORDO | May 22, 1994
Westminster, Calif. -- In the midst of Southern California sprawl, Little Saigon is a classic American suburb with a Southeast Asian twist."For every two Vietnamese that come to U.S., one comes to Orange County," says Yen Do, the publisher of the Vietnamese daily newspaper, Nguoi Viet, which operates in a small business park in this enclave known as Little Saigon.Middle-aged women here buy ao dais, the traditional Vietnamese garment of dress and pants, in dark green or purple silk. Those newly arrived sip strong Vietnamese-style coffee sweetened with condensed milk and play a chess game popular in their homeland.
NEWS
By Peter S. Goodman and Peter S. Goodman,Contributing Writer | July 9, 1992
HO CHI MINH CITY, Vietnam -- Once it was a war; then it was a movie. Now it's a bar.Welcome to the Apocalypse Now, Ho Chi Minh City's latest, trendiest watering hole where young backpack-toting travelers from Europe and North America down beers with leftover bar girls from the city's raunchy heyday. The sound of the Doors, the rock 'n' roll band forever associated with the war, vibrates through the sparsely decorated, dimly lighted room.The existence of the place, which opened a year ago, confirms that despite 16 years of socialism, the people of what used to be called Saigon have not lost their canny knack for making a buck.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | April 27, 2000
Betty Tisdale tried to ignore the pleading women surrounding her bus, offering their bundles up to the windows and begging, "take my baby, take my baby." She and a group of orphans were on their way to the airport and away from a frantic, chaotic Saigon in April of 1975. The Vietnamese government had been specific: Only children approved for adoption by American families could leave the country. Babies without papers couldn't go. The screaming mothers didn't care. Saigon was about to fall, and they wanted their babies on that bus, taken to safety.
NEWS
By Mai Tran and Mai Tran,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 25, 2004
The State Department has canceled a weekend visit to Southern California's Little Saigon by Vietnamese Communist Party leaders after Westminster, Calif., officials said they could not guarantee their safety. The trip to the largest Vietnamese community in the United States was planned by the Vietnamese government and intended as a gesture of good will to improve relations with expatriates who fled or migrated. The delegation, which will visit Los Angeles today and San Francisco, New York City and Washington in the days ahead, planned to tour the Little Saigon business and shopping district by motorcade, escorted by California Highway Patrol officers.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | December 18, 2012
The third time is the charm - at least that's what fans of Saigon Remembered are hoping. Originally located on Belair Road, then on York Road in Govans, Saigon Remembered closed its doors in 2011. But the restaurant reopened last month in the CranbrookShopping Center in Cockeysville, with the same friendly service and careful interpretations of Vietnamese specialties that fans will remember. Vegetarian-friendly and healthful, Vietnamesefoodrelies on fresh herbs and vegetables for flavor.
ENTERTAINMENT
by Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2012
Saigon Remembered has reopened in the Cranbrook Shopping Center in Cockeysville. In an email to his faithful customers, owner and executive chef Trang Nguyen said that this is "third and most intimate incarnation of Baltimore's first and finest restaurant dedicated to serving authentic Vietnamese and Pan Asian cuisine. " Nguyen also told his customers that the new Saigon Remembered, unlike the first incarnations on Belair Road and across from the Senator movie theater on York Road, has plenty of free parking.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | October 27, 2012
Cary deRussy, the former publisher of Fishing in Maryland magazine, died of emphysema complications Oct. 10 at Atlantic General Hospital in Berlin. The former Mays Chapel resident was 70. Born Wilson Cary Nicholas deRussy in Baltimore and raised in Ruxton, he was a 1960 graduate of St. Paul's School, where he was on the wrestling, cross country and tennis teams. He earned a photography degree at the Maryland Institute College of Art in 1964. Family members said that during the Vietnam War, he joined the CIA and spent two years in Saigon working with the Special Forces.
NEWS
March 23, 2011
In his otherwise well written and informative column ("In absence of a draft, the winds of war blow again," March 22) Dan Rodricks continues to propagate the new liberal myth, namely that Afghanistan, at 10 years' length, is our "longest" war. Nope! That dubious honor still belongs to Vietnam, which the Vietnamese themselves date back to President Truman in 1945. We "left" in 1973, but we were still evacuating Marines from the roof of the U.S. Embassy in then Saigon (now Ho Chi Minh City)
NEWS
May 16, 2009
HUGH VAN ES, 67 Photojournalist Hugh Van Es, a Dutch photojournalist who covered the Vietnam War and recorded the most famous image of the fall of Saigon in 1975 - a group of people scaling a ladder to a CIA helicopter on a rooftop - died Friday morning in Hong Kong. Mr. Van Es suffered a brain hemorrhage last week and never regained consciousness. His photo of a wounded soldier with a tiny cross gleaming against his dark silhouette, taken 40 years ago this month, became the best-known picture from the May 1969 battle of Hamburger Hill.
NEWS
By Robert Timberg and Robert Timberg,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 18, 2005
WASHINGTON - John D. Negroponte, President Bush's surprise choice to oversee the nation's sprawling intelligence community, is a veteran diplomat who in a career spanning portions of five decades has served in international trouble spots ranging from Saigon during the Vietnam War to Baghdad today. He was at Henry A. Kissinger's side at the Paris peace talks to end the war in Vietnam, immersed in supporting the Nicaraguan contras from Honduras during the Reagan years, the nation's point man at the United Nations as Bush pressed for action against Saddam Hussein and, now, the first U.S. ambassador to post-Hussein Iraq.
NEWS
By David Lamb and David Lamb,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 25, 1997
HO CHI MINH CITY, Vietnam -- OK, so it isn't Saigon anymore. But hold the obituaries. Good times are here again. Strip away the veneer of communism and there, among the ghosts of the past, this former wartime capital still has the heart of a hustler and the soul of a damsel.Actually, the name Ho Chi Minh City never caught on. It was like turning Boston into John Fitzgerald Kennedy City. It just didn't sound right. It conjured up no images of Graham Greene on the Continental Hotel's veranda or tamarind-shaded boulevards or lazy summer days around the pool at the Cercle Sportif.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 10, 1999
HANOI, Vietnam -- On the third floor of the Ho Chi Minh Museum here stands an exhibit that looks as if it belongs in a 1950s-theme restaurant. A Ford Edsel hurtles through a wall of glass, symbolizing the flawed thinking that led to the U.S. defeat in Vietnam.Across from Ford's folly is a photo of an American soldier covered in mud. And there is a picture of Dizzy Gillespie, though exactly what it represents -- American decadence embodied in jazz? -- isn't entirely clear.The Ho Chi Minh Museum is like that: sometimes blunt, sometimes oblique and often surreal.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 21, 2004
When it comes to mounting a show, dinner theaters tend to concern themselves with what's functional rather than what's spectacular. But Toby's isn't like most dinner theaters, which explains why spectacle has become rather a way of life at the Columbia dinner theater on Symphony Woods Road. Last season, Toby Orenstein, the theater's director and proprietor, used every nook and cranny of her space to weave the grand tapestry of turn-of-the-century America that is the gripping musical Ragtime.
NEWS
By Mai Tran and Mai Tran,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 25, 2004
The State Department has canceled a weekend visit to Southern California's Little Saigon by Vietnamese Communist Party leaders after Westminster, Calif., officials said they could not guarantee their safety. The trip to the largest Vietnamese community in the United States was planned by the Vietnamese government and intended as a gesture of good will to improve relations with expatriates who fled or migrated. The delegation, which will visit Los Angeles today and San Francisco, New York City and Washington in the days ahead, planned to tour the Little Saigon business and shopping district by motorcade, escorted by California Highway Patrol officers.
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