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By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | August 30, 2011
Science Applications International Corp. is warning state regulators that it might have to lay off about 83 employees in Bethesda if a federal contract is not renewed, the state said Tuesday. The McLean, Va.-based government contractor, best known as SAIC, told the state that the contract involves information technology work for the National Institutes of Health. The layoffs would occur Oct. 28, according to the notice sent to the Maryland Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation.
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BUSINESS
August 8, 2013
A man with dual citizenship will wait another week in the Irish court system for a decision regarding his extradition on a Maryland arrest warrant, according to multiple Irish media sources ' reports Thursday morning. Meanwhile, the malware attack on Eric Eoin Marques' servers that coincided with his arrest last week may have taken down a tool vital to journalists, dissidents and whistleblowers. According to The Telegraph: So-called 'darknet' services like Tor have a bad name, because they are used to spread pornography and images of child abuse, as well as to sell drugs via sites such as the Silk Road.
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EXPLORE
August 13, 2012
The U.S. Army Edgewood Chemical Biological Center (ECBC) and contracting firm SAIC are answering the Army's call for more green technologies to be developed by partnering to create the Tactical Garbage to Energy Refinery (TGER) 2.0 system. To do so, ECBC and SAIC have entered into a cooperative research and development agreement - an agreement between a government agency and a private company - to work together on research and development to speed the commercialization of technology.
BUSINESS
By Marjorie Censer, The Washington Post | August 30, 2012
McLean, Va.-based Science Applications International Corp. said Thursday that it plans to split into two public companies, taking a major step to unwind a strategy that attempted to more tightly integrate its historically independent units. The decision comes just months after SAIC appointed its fourth chief executive, retired Air Force Gen. John P. Jumper, with a mandate to re-energize the business. SAIC has been known as an especially entrepreneurial contractor. Founded by a physicist who led the business for more than three decades, SAIC allowed its units to operate autonomously, and managers were encouraged to pursue their own work.
BUSINESS
By Marjorie Censer, The Washington Post | August 30, 2012
McLean, Va.-based Science Applications International Corp. said Thursday that it plans to split into two public companies, taking a major step to unwind a strategy that attempted to more tightly integrate its historically independent units. The decision comes just months after SAIC appointed its fourth chief executive, retired Air Force Gen. John P. Jumper, with a mandate to re-energize the business. SAIC has been known as an especially entrepreneurial contractor. Founded by a physicist who led the business for more than three decades, SAIC allowed its units to operate autonomously, and managers were encouraged to pursue their own work.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | October 26, 2003
When the Pentagon wanted to assemble a team of Iraqi exiles to assist in restoring postwar Iraq, it gave the job to a company with a name not chosen for flashy marketing: Science Applications International Corp. When Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. wanted experts to assess alleged security problems with electronic voting machines Maryland is buying, he, too, turned to SAIC. The National Security Agency signed a contract with SAIC last year to overhaul its top-secret eavesdropping systems. The Army hired the company to support the delicate task of destroying old chemical weapons at Aberdeen Proving Ground.
BUSINESS
August 8, 2013
A man with dual citizenship will wait another week in the Irish court system for a decision regarding his extradition on a Maryland arrest warrant, according to multiple Irish media sources ' reports Thursday morning. Meanwhile, the malware attack on Eric Eoin Marques' servers that coincided with his arrest last week may have taken down a tool vital to journalists, dissidents and whistleblowers. According to The Telegraph: So-called 'darknet' services like Tor have a bad name, because they are used to spread pornography and images of child abuse, as well as to sell drugs via sites such as the Silk Road.
NEWS
By SIOBHAN GORMAN and SIOBHAN GORMAN,SUN REPORTER | January 29, 2006
When the National Security Agency went shopping for a private contractor to help it build a state-of-the-art tool for plucking key threats to the nation from a worldwide sea of digital communication, the company it chose was Science Applications International Corp. More than three years later, the project, code-named Trailblazer, still hasn't gotten off the ground. And intelligence experts inside and outside the agency say that the NSA and SAIC share some of the blame. Investigations of Trailblazer's early years by Congress and the NSA inspector general criticized the agency for its "confusion" about what Trailblazer would ultimately accomplish and for "inadequate management and oversight" of the program to improve collection and analysis of mountains of digital information.
NEWS
By Newsday | May 25, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Four federal agencies are examining allegations that the Air Force was sold useless fighter cockpit displays by a California defense contractor whose board members at the time included William Perry, now secretary of BTC defense, and two other top Pentagon officials.Under scrutiny is a 1987-91 contract between the Air Force and Scientific Applications International Corp., based in San Diego. During those four years, its high-powered board of directors included Mr. Perry; John Deutch, now the deputy secretary of defense, and Anita Jones, the new director of defense research and engineering.
NEWS
By Newsday | May 25, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Four federal agencies are examining allegations that the Air Force was sold useless fighter cockpit displays by a California defense contractor whose board members at the time included William J. Perry, now secretary of defense, and two other top Pentagon officials.Under scrutiny is a 1987-1991 contract between the Air Force and Scientific Applications International Corp., based in San Diego. During those four years, its high-powered board of directors included Mr. Perry; John Deutch, now the deputy secretary of defense; and Anita Jones, the new director of defense research and engineering.
EXPLORE
August 13, 2012
The U.S. Army Edgewood Chemical Biological Center (ECBC) and contracting firm SAIC are answering the Army's call for more green technologies to be developed by partnering to create the Tactical Garbage to Energy Refinery (TGER) 2.0 system. To do so, ECBC and SAIC have entered into a cooperative research and development agreement - an agreement between a government agency and a private company - to work together on research and development to speed the commercialization of technology.
EXPLORE
December 27, 2011
Harford County Public Library recently unveiled the expansion of its LEAP: Learn, Explore and Play science kit collection. According to a library news release, LEAP kits consist of high quality science equipment, materials and resources, and use play as a motivator for children to explore science and technology. Originally housed in the Edgewood branch since 2007, this recent expansion includes LEAP kits at the Aberdeen, Bel Air and Whiteford libraries. According to the library, the collection grew three-fold in the last six months because of the overwhelming support from the community.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | August 30, 2011
Science Applications International Corp. is warning state regulators that it might have to lay off about 83 employees in Bethesda if a federal contract is not renewed, the state said Tuesday. The McLean, Va.-based government contractor, best known as SAIC, told the state that the contract involves information technology work for the National Institutes of Health. The layoffs would occur Oct. 28, according to the notice sent to the Maryland Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2010
Although thousands of people driving on Interstate 95 daily pass the big "SAIC" letters on a Columbia office building, few get inside to see a slice of one of the newest, fastest-growing fields: developing new techniques for blocking electronic attacks on U.S. defense and commercial interests. The ceremonial opening Monday of a Cyber Innovation Center at Science Applications International Corp. in Columbia's Gateway Business Park offered a brief glimpse. The firm employs about 500 people in the year-old building just west of the highway, according to Senior Vice President Larry Cox, but the national Cyber Command to be built at Fort Meade will occupy an estimated 5.8 million-square-foot complex, according to officials, making it a much larger presence and bringing far more new jobs to the area than the federal defense job transfers connected to the base relocation program will.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2010
Defense contractor Science Applications International Corp. said it is laying off about 35 people in its Aberdeen and Edgewood offices as part of a restructuring that will eliminate 60 jobs across the country. The cuts, to SAIC's Infrastructure, Logistics & Product Solutions Group, are "part of ongoing efforts to more strategically align business capabilities and achieve efficient, cost-effective business services to better serve customers," said spokeswoman Melissa Koskovich.
BUSINESS
August 24, 2007
Maryland : Biotechnology MedImmune licenses `reverse genetics' MedImmune Inc. has licensed its "reverse genetics" technology to Novartis, a Swiss company that owns flu-shot manufacturer Chiron. Novartis will use the technique to create seasonal and pandemic influenza vaccines. Reverse genetics is thought to be a faster and safer means of vaccine production than the current standard. In late 2005, Gaithersburg-based MedImmune acquired the final exclusive license to the last of four intellectual property portfolios that govern the use of reverse genetics in making human flu vaccines, which means anyone else who wants to get in on it has to get the company's permission first.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | October 21, 2003
The Maryland General Assembly yesterday asked for its own analysis of the state's planned purchase of electronic touch-screen voting machines, including a review to determine whether an earlier study ordered by Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. was "free of outside influence." "We think we need an independent look at it," said Sen. Paula C. Hollinger, a Baltimore County Democrat and chairwoman of the Senate Education, Health and Environmental Affairs Committee, which has jurisdiction over voting issues.
EXPLORE
December 27, 2011
Harford County Public Library recently unveiled the expansion of its LEAP: Learn, Explore and Play science kit collection. According to a library news release, LEAP kits consist of high quality science equipment, materials and resources, and use play as a motivator for children to explore science and technology. Originally housed in the Edgewood branch since 2007, this recent expansion includes LEAP kits at the Aberdeen, Bel Air and Whiteford libraries. According to the library, the collection grew three-fold in the last six months because of the overwhelming support from the community.
NEWS
By SUSAN GVOZDAS and SUSAN GVOZDAS,Special to the Sun | February 25, 2007
After getting a crash course on how thousands of technology jobs are coming to Fort Meade in the next five years, Dahmar Smiles thinks he just might go to an in-state college after all. By the time the Meade High School junior graduates from college, the Defense Information Systems Agency will have moved its headquarters from Northern Virginia to the Army base in western Anne Arundel County as part of the Base Realignment and Closure process, known as...
NEWS
By SIOBHAN GORMAN and SIOBHAN GORMAN,SUN REPORTER | January 29, 2006
When the National Security Agency went shopping for a private contractor to help it build a state-of-the-art tool for plucking key threats to the nation from a worldwide sea of digital communication, the company it chose was Science Applications International Corp. More than three years later, the project, code-named Trailblazer, still hasn't gotten off the ground. And intelligence experts inside and outside the agency say that the NSA and SAIC share some of the blame. Investigations of Trailblazer's early years by Congress and the NSA inspector general criticized the agency for its "confusion" about what Trailblazer would ultimately accomplish and for "inadequate management and oversight" of the program to improve collection and analysis of mountains of digital information.
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