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NEWS
December 1, 2009
LONDON - Iran is holding five British sailors after stopping their racing yacht in the Persian Gulf, the British government said Monday. The move could heighten tensions between Iran and major world powers, including Britain, that are demanding a halt to its nuclear program. The yacht owned by Sail Bahrain was stopped on its way from the tiny island country to the Gulf city of Dubai on Wednesday when it "may have strayed inadvertently into Iranian waters," Britain's Foreign Office said.
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SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2014
The way things have gone this week in Baltimore, it would not be a tremendous surprise if news broke tomorrow that Francis Scott Key plagiarized "The Star-Spangled Banner. " Four days after the shocking Ray Rice elevator video placed Charm City in a very uncharming light , Major League Baseball announced on Friday that Orioles corner infielder  Chris Davis has been suspended for 25 games after testing positive for an amphetamine. The suspension is a major blow to the Orioles, who are heading toward the postseason already without star players Manny Machado and Matt Wieters, and a second national embarrassment for a city that remains at the center of the NFL's domestic abuse scandal.
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NEWS
February 10, 2014
A national firm is not qualified to complete a simple engineering study of the city's speed cameras ( "Mayor says audit firm was 'not sufficiently qualified,'" Jan. 29). I wonder if their results had anything to do with that fact. And now we are going to do it all over again. This reminds me a lot of the Wizard of Oz. There is a curtain behind which decisions are made and then smoke bellows forth. I bet the next audit, if there is one, turns out a lot better. Stas Chrzanowski, Canton - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
BUSINESS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2014
Developer Patrick Turner again put off possible foreclosure on the South Baltimore waterfront he wants to redevelop as the parties agreed Monday in backruptcy court to an Oct. 24 hearing on all matters in the case. The delay gives Turner's Inner Harbor West LLC another month or so to attempt to come to terms with creditor Westport Property Investments LLC, which had asked the court to lift the automatic stay triggered by the bankruptcy that blocks foreclosure. If Turner and his creditors don't reach agreement before then, Judge Robert A. Gordon could be asked to decide the fate of Turner's aspiration to turn 43 acres on the Patapsco River into a project including homes, stores, hotels, a high-rise building and a park.
NEWS
By Jeff Shain | May 6, 2010
Three of Charlotte's finest came rushing down the slope with all the urgency that might accompany a hazardous materials leak. Within moments, one male spectator found himself being led away swiftly from the Quail Hollow Championship's 17th green. When the man's buddy stood up to complain, the other officers descended for a round of sharp conversation. "Do you want to give Charlotte a bad reputation?" one officer asked, cutting off the man's response to ask the question again.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | December 7, 2012
Attention, Anglophiles: How's this for a cast? Charlotte Rampling, Rufus Sewell, Michael Gambon, Michelle Dockery and Hayley Atwell? That's the lineup for "Restless," a two-night miniseries about World War II, betrayal and British spies that starts at 9 p.m. Friday on the Sundance Channel. Check out my review in the video above. And, yes, Dockery, who plays Rampling's daughter is indeed Lady Mary of "Downton Hall" fame. But where is Mr. Pamuk?  
NEWS
August 14, 1991
L. William Seidman, the tough, blunt overseer of disaster in the banking and thrift industries, is stepping down in his own good time, with his reputation flourishing and his foes in disarray. man who took on White House chief of staff John Sununu before it was fashionable, Mr. Seidman turned one of the most difficult jobs in government into a proving ground for integrity and truthfulness.As chairman of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation when commercial banks were falling upon hard times and as chairman of the Resolution Trust Corporation formed to bail out the savings and loan industry, Mr. Seidman has been a key government figure during one of the most turbulent periods of U.S. financial history.
NEWS
January 25, 1994
The almost segregated-by-sex reaction (women in favor, men not) to Lorena Bobbitt's acquittal suggests, in addition to the public's macabre fascination with her revengeful mutilation of her husband, that there is a lesson about women's state of mind following extreme physical and emotional abuse. Certainly women do not see the Bobbitt case as a model for revenge; there are better ways to get even. Still, "Burning Bed" scenarios in which women kill their abusers are not uncommon.There were men on the jury, too, and there are plenty of signs that men and women are largely in agreement that America has passed the point where customs shaped by the instincts and predetermined roles of distant eras can prevail in society.
NEWS
December 29, 1990
The trials and tribulations of the Belvedere Hotel never seem to end. First a Florida developer backed out of a contract to buy the building for $5.5 million. Then a foreclosure auction failed to produce a third-party buyer, prompting creditors to acquire the Mount Vernon landmark for $3.5 million -- which just a few weeks ago was the estimated value of the 97-year-old hotel's food and beverage operations alone.Over the past 12 years, Victor Frenkil sank nearly $12 million into the Belvedere, including $6.6.
NEWS
By From Sun news services | January 23, 2009
Can the X-Men be reunited and save the world? That's the question facing Wolverine as Nicktoons Network introduces Wolverine and the X-Men with back-to-back episodes tonight. The 26-part animated saga focuses on Wolverine, the most famous of the X-Men, a year after a mysterious explosion destroyed the Xavier Institute and led to the breakup of the heroic X-Men fraternity. Embittered, alone and trying to keep a low profile, Wolverine is suddenly drawn back into trouble in the form of the government's Mutant Response Division.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2014
Remember how John Waters hitchhiked across the U.S. in the spring of 2012 -- part of the research, he said, for his next book? Well, the long wait is finally (almost) over. "Carsick: John Waters Hitchhikes Across America" is set to be released June 3 by Farrar, Straus and Giroux. The book, Waters says, will be separated into three parts: -- First, he ruminates over the best rides he could have had (sample from amazon.com's blurb: "a friendly drug dealer hands over piles of cash to finance films with no questions asked")
NEWS
February 10, 2014
A national firm is not qualified to complete a simple engineering study of the city's speed cameras ( "Mayor says audit firm was 'not sufficiently qualified,'" Jan. 29). I wonder if their results had anything to do with that fact. And now we are going to do it all over again. This reminds me a lot of the Wizard of Oz. There is a curtain behind which decisions are made and then smoke bellows forth. I bet the next audit, if there is one, turns out a lot better. Stas Chrzanowski, Canton - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
SPORTS
Peter Schmuck | January 13, 2014
There wasn't much in Sunday night's "60 Minutes" report on baseball's Alex Rodriguez investigation that could truly shock anyone at this point in the sport's tawdry PED era. Everyone knows that anabolic steroids and other sophisticated performance-enhancing substances have been rampant in baseball for decades. The thing that was most revealing about the interview with Biogenesis snake oil salesman Anthony Bosch and the documentary evidence presented was the lengths that athletes will go to gain some advantage over the competition and the lengths that Major League Baseball was willing to go -- in this case -- to build a case against one of the most celebrated of the alleged steroid offenders.
ENTERTAINMENT
Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | February 24, 2013
Seems like the “Twilight” folks saved the worst for last. “Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn Part 2,” the last of five films adapting author Stephenie Meyer's best-selling tales of vampires, werewolves and teen lust, was lauded as the worst picture of 2012 at Saturday night's 33 rd annual Razzie Awards. Although the preceding four “Twilight” films had frequently been nominated for Razzies, the Golden Raspberry Award Foundation, arbiters of cinematic bad taste since 1980, had largely left the incredulously successful film series alone.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | December 7, 2012
Attention, Anglophiles: How's this for a cast? Charlotte Rampling, Rufus Sewell, Michael Gambon, Michelle Dockery and Hayley Atwell? That's the lineup for "Restless," a two-night miniseries about World War II, betrayal and British spies that starts at 9 p.m. Friday on the Sundance Channel. Check out my review in the video above. And, yes, Dockery, who plays Rampling's daughter is indeed Lady Mary of "Downton Hall" fame. But where is Mr. Pamuk?  
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel and The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2012
Every morning, Monday through Friday, blogger Matt Vensel will hook you up with reading material -- mostly on the Ravens but with some other Baltimore sports stuff, too -- to skim through as you slug down coffee and slack off at the start of your workday. That way he'll have an excuse to do the same to start his workday, too. On Tuesday, someone from the Bovada sportsbook sent me over some interesting Ravens prop bets. Now I'm not encouraging gambling, but it is fun to talk about over/unders.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | September 14, 1993
Washington -- In a note in the program for the Kennedy Center's pre-Broadway production of "The Kentucky Cycle," playwright Robert Schenkkan explains that he began this epic work, which consists of nine one-act plays, with the playlet called "Tall Tales."And indeed, "Tall Tales" is the pivotal segment of this two-part, six-hour Pulitzer Prize-winning saga -- a work that is as American as the frontier where it begins, as ambitious as the pioneers who supposedly "tamed" it, and as important as history itself, even though it is less compelling in the early stretches than in the more chillingly familiar scenes from our own century.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Stroh and By Michael Stroh,Sun Staff | January 14, 2001
"World War 3.0: Microsoft and Its Enemies" by Ken Auletta. Random House. 436 pages. $27.95 Microsoft and its lawyers will return to a Washington appeals court next month for round two of its historic antitrust battle with the U.S. government. At stake is whether one of the most successful and influential companies of the 20th century will survive intact into the 21st. For anybody who didn't get enough of U.S. vs. Microsoft the first time around -- or just didn't get it, period -- New Yorker writer Ken Auletta has just published his much anticipated behind-the-scenes account of the historic court battle.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | March 7, 2012
He has maintained a relatively low profile on the Sandra Fluke story, but Democratic Rep. Elijah E. Cummings played a big role in putting the Georgetown law student in the spotlight and sparking a nationwide conversation over contraceptives. Fluke, 30, has become a national figure in the debate over whether insurance companies should be required to cover the cost of birth control for employees at religious-based institutions. Her profile was elevated last week when conservative radio talk show host Rush Limbaugh used slurs to describe her and then apologized for the comments.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly | January 24, 2012
The champagne corks can be popped now throughout baseball. Popped in the Motor City and by national baseball writers who have been held hostage by Prince Fielder Talk, Day 112. Fielder has reportedly signed with the Detroit Tigers for nine years and $214 million, according to various outlets, including Yahoo Sports and CBS Sports. That's roughly $23.8 million per season. Let's recap. I was told yesterday that a seven-year, $140 million deal -- what the Orioles offered Mark Teixeira a couple of offseasons ago -- would be out of the Orioles' comfort zone for Fielder.
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