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By Jill Wendholt Silva and Jill Wendholt Silva,McClatchy-Tribune | October 3, 2007
Sure, a boneless, skinless chicken breast is an economical and lean protein source. But it can also be boring! What to do? To paraphrase Emeril: Kick it up a pinch! Any blend of seasonings will do the trick - French, Cajun or Indian-inspired, as is the case with this recipe for Saffron Chicken With Fennel Seeds. Any chef will tell you that fat carries flavor. So the key to low-fat cooking - bam! - is to pump up the flavor. Adding exotic spices can be a great way to add flavor, color and texture.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,elizabeth.large@baltsun.com | November 2, 2008
I regularly get asked where to eat around the airport. I'm not sure why. Maybe people like to get close and relax before a flight, or want to have dinner immediately after picking up a passenger. But it doesn't matter, because I never have a good answer for them. Recently, though, I learned that local celeb chef Edward Kim had become executive chef of Luminous, the restaurant in the Westin Baltimore Washington Airport. Kim opened Ixia in Mount Vernon, then moved on to open his own restaurant, Soigne in Locust Point, and later worked as head chef at Saffron (now Indigma)
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NEWS
February 11, 2005
On Thursday, February 10, 2005, ROBERT J. "BOB" of Winfield, beloved husband of Doris M. (nee Euler) Saffron, loving father of Barbara L. Snyder and her late husband Ronald, Suzanne and her husband Jerry W. Linville. Cherished Pop Pop of Laurie Orfanidis, Wendy Higgins and Jon Linville and their spouses, seven great-grandchildren, dear brother of Arma Martin Eirich and her family, his brother-in-law John C. Euler and sister-in-law Justine and many nieces and nephews Friends may call at the Burrier-Queen Funeral & Crematory P.A., 1212 West Old Liberty Rd., Winfield (Beside South Carroll H.S.)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Swift | October 5, 2008
BOOKS David Sedaris: The wickedly funny David Sedaris, whose tales of midget guitar teachers and licking light switches have earned him a cultlike following, is on the road again. The best-selling author will visit 34 cities this fall, testing new material that could end up in his next book. The crowds will even have a chance to ask him questions. He speaks at 8 tonight at the Meyerhoff. For more: ticketmaster.com DVD 'The Visitor': Richard Jenkins stars as a disaffected professor whose life is reshaped after discovering immigrant squatters in his little-used New York flat.
NEWS
By SLOANE BROWN | May 17, 2006
Fans of the late, lamented South Baltimore eatery Soigne have reason to celebrate. And a place to do that celebrating. Soigne chef/co-owner Edward Kim is back in Baltimore, in a new partnership and restaurant. After a brief stint at D.C.'s Mercado, Kim has joined forces with Tony Chemmanoor to give his Indian fusion restaurant Saffron a makeover. "D.C. was a little cold for me. I really missed Baltimore, the warmth of the people here," Kim says. As Kim becomes executive chef/partner at Saffron, Indian fusion is a thing of the past.
NEWS
By ELIZABETH LARGE | May 30, 2007
I got an e-mail from chef Edward Kim saying that as of June 17, he no longer will be executive chef at Saffron Modern American. (Apparently that's the formal name of the restaurant at 802 N. Charles St. in Mount Vernon.) I talked to him on the phone, and he said his one-year contract has expired, and he didn't want to sign a new one. When I asked him why he was leaving, he said, "It was interesting and challenging - and let's just leave it at that." No word on where he's going next. All he said was, "I'll be looking for other opportunities in the Baltimore/Maryland area."
NEWS
August 8, 2007
In the end, Tony Chemmanoor, head of the Bombay Grill restaurant group, has gone back to what he knows best: Indian food. Chemmanoor is the owner of what was the group's crown jewel, Saffron at 800 N. Charles St. When it opened, Saffron served Indian fusion cuisine and then later, Asian fusion. When its last chef, Edward Kim, left, Chemmanoor closed the place to regroup and make a few renovations. It will reopen as Indigma - "not a fusion restaurant," he told me. As of press time, he was planning to reopen today, but he made it clear that might not happen.
NEWS
By ELIZABETH LARGE and ELIZABETH LARGE,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | June 18, 2006
Edward Kim has had success because he understands one simple truth. As a chef, you can indulge your over-the-top imagination. You can create rich and strange concoctions involving ingredients that shouldn't work together. You can fuse Asian with Tex-Mex and call it modern American. You can even mention fig syrup more than once on your menu. But at the end of the day, the food has to taste good. I'm always amazed at the number of chefs who haven't quite caught on to this. Kim is the local chef who a few years ago was a hit at Ixia.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 11, 2003
Tony and Ann Chemmanoor are going for a lucky seven. Last week, they opened their seventh restaurant in the Baltimore area, in the Mount Vernon space previously occupied by the Ruby Lounge. But, unlike their six Bombay Grills, the new place isn't an Indian restaurant. Tony Chemmanoor says he's aiming for a new dining concept for Baltimore. The name is a clue -- Saffron -- after the classic Indian spice. Think modern fine dining with creative European and Asian influences. Then toss Indian spices into the mix. Check out the menu.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | February 26, 2005
What is art? is not the question. What is saffron? is the question. More than previous works of public art, Christo and Jeanne-Claude's The Gates has been open to colorful interpretation. The pleated fabric panels hanging from the 7,500 gates winding through Central Park have been described as the color of Orangeade, Home Depot signs, highway safety cones or, as The New Yorker reported this week, "something you would wear only in the woods during deer season." These observers, obviously, have not bought into the saffron designation that Christo and Jeanne-Claude have given the color and instead believe they are seeing orange.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,special to the sun | April 30, 2008
The team of Howard County cooking students competing in the National ProStart Invitational last week received praise for their recipes and compliments on their knife skills, but did not place in the Top 5, said Elaine Heilman, the Applications and Research Lab teacher who supervises the team. "The students did very well," Heilman said. The final ranking won't be known for about two weeks. This marked the fourth year in a row that the ARL team won the state-level cooking competition, earning the chance to compete at the national level.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun restaurant critic | October 7, 2007
There are spots where no restaurant lasts for long, for whatever reasons. The location where Indigma has opened is one of those. By my reckoning, it's been a Donna's Restaurant, a Ruby Lounge under two different owners, Saffron (with two completely different concepts and different executive chefs) and now Indigma, a restaurant that showcases innovative Indian cuisine, mostly northern but with touches of southern. If you're happy with your neighborhood Indian restaurant's lamb saag and chicken tikka masala, I'm not going to urge you to try Indigma.
NEWS
By Jill Wendholt Silva and Jill Wendholt Silva,McClatchy-Tribune | October 3, 2007
Sure, a boneless, skinless chicken breast is an economical and lean protein source. But it can also be boring! What to do? To paraphrase Emeril: Kick it up a pinch! Any blend of seasonings will do the trick - French, Cajun or Indian-inspired, as is the case with this recipe for Saffron Chicken With Fennel Seeds. Any chef will tell you that fat carries flavor. So the key to low-fat cooking - bam! - is to pump up the flavor. Adding exotic spices can be a great way to add flavor, color and texture.
NEWS
August 8, 2007
In the end, Tony Chemmanoor, head of the Bombay Grill restaurant group, has gone back to what he knows best: Indian food. Chemmanoor is the owner of what was the group's crown jewel, Saffron at 800 N. Charles St. When it opened, Saffron served Indian fusion cuisine and then later, Asian fusion. When its last chef, Edward Kim, left, Chemmanoor closed the place to regroup and make a few renovations. It will reopen as Indigma - "not a fusion restaurant," he told me. As of press time, he was planning to reopen today, but he made it clear that might not happen.
NEWS
By ELIZABETH LARGE | July 4, 2007
If you think the new Yellow Dog Tavern (700 S. Potomac St., 410-342-0280) sounds like another in a long list of places in Canton that specializes in bar food, you'd be wrong. Co-owner and head chef Anita Scheiding describes the fare as "home-cooked, casual fine dining." The new owners converted the space where Mike's Happy Hour bar used to be into a two-story restaurant with a "casual upscale environment." In other words, don't dress up; but don't expect Buffalo wings either. Dinner entrees range from a vegetarian platter for $9.99 to roasted sea bass with mushrooms and a tequila-lime sauce for $24.99.
NEWS
By ELIZABETH LARGE | May 30, 2007
I got an e-mail from chef Edward Kim saying that as of June 17, he no longer will be executive chef at Saffron Modern American. (Apparently that's the formal name of the restaurant at 802 N. Charles St. in Mount Vernon.) I talked to him on the phone, and he said his one-year contract has expired, and he didn't want to sign a new one. When I asked him why he was leaving, he said, "It was interesting and challenging - and let's just leave it at that." No word on where he's going next. All he said was, "I'll be looking for other opportunities in the Baltimore/Maryland area."
FEATURES
By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 11, 1996
Inspiration for today's menu comes from George Goins, the spa chef at the Doral Spa in Miami. The recipes are light in fat and calories yet delicious enough to serve for company.The salad features slices of fresh tomatoes and oranges fanned over a bed of romaine lettuce. For a dressing, you need only combine some raspberry vinegar with a drop of olive oil and drizzle over all.The dessert can be easily concocted by mixing 1 tablespoon fresh lime juice and 2/3 cup powdered sugar with 8 ounces of softened reduced-fat cream cheese.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Sun Staff | October 1, 2003
In the plains of La Mancha, Spain, the quest for gold is about to begin. In the next few weeks, workers will go out into the fields to pluck the blossoms from the fall crocus. Inside each blossom is the treasure -- three thin yellow-orange threads that make the most expensive spice in the world -- saffron. Since ancient times, cooks have experienced the allure of the spice that turns dishes golden-yellow and imparts a pungent flavor no other spice can duplicate. Recipes may allow cooks to substitute turmeric or safflower, but those spices cannot imitate saffron's distinctive flavor.
FEATURES
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | May 12, 2007
My 30-something-year-old son is a last-minute person, so I wasn't surprised when he called recently to say that he and his family had decided to drive out from Boston to western Massachusetts for a Sunday afternoon visit. "We'll just have an early supper with you and Dad," he informed me, "then head back." I had no hint that this was in the works but I was delighted at the chance to see him and his wife plus our two little grandchildren. Never mind that I had so much on my plate that I hadn't given a thought to entertaining that particular week.
NEWS
By Robin Mather Jenkins and Robin Mather Jenkins,Chicago Tribune | May 9, 2007
Charmoula is the traditional Moroccan seasoning for fish, and having a version in your repertoire makes a North African-influenced dinner as close as your food processor. Here's one we like. Robin Mather Jenkins writes for the Chicago Tribune, which provided the recipe analysis. Moroccan Baked Fish Serves 4 -- Total time: 28 minutes 2 cloves garlic 1 piece (1-inch long) ginger root, grated 3/4 cup each, loosely packed: flat-leaf parsley, cilantro leaves 3 tablespoons olive oil 2 tablespoons orange juice plus more for thinning 1 teaspoon each: cumin, hot paprika, lemon zest 1/2 teaspoon coriander seed 1/8 teaspoon each: saffron (optional)
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