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Safety Valve

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NEWS
By Julie Stewart | February 1, 2001
WASHINGTON -- When a bit player in a drug deal gets nearly 20 years in prison, something's wrong with the system. That's what then-President Bill Clinton concluded when he commuted the sentence of Derrick Curry and 20 others serving lengthy mandatory prison sentences for drug crimes. Mr. Curry's case provides a good example of a wrong that plagues our criminal justice system -- a rigid sentencing system that incarcerates federal drug offenders for fixed, lengthy terms, regardless of the circumstances of their cases.
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SPORTS
By Laura Vecsey | November 16, 2004
RONNIE LOTT, Rod Woodson, Ed Reed. It may be premature, but it's tempting to check the list of Pro Bowl/Hall of Fame defensive backs who were big-hitting, ball-hawking game-breakers and wonder how and where Ravens safety Ed Reed stacks up. Two weeks. Two games. Two Ravens' wins, courtesy of No. 20. That doesn't even account for the sack, forced fumble and recovery Reed ran back 22 yards for a touchdown in the Ravens' win over the Redskins, a score that commenced a string of 17 unanswered points for the Ravens.
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NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | July 27, 1993
RICHMOND, Calif. -- A huge white cloud of sulfuric acid spewed out of a ruptured railroad car yesterday, engulfing thousands of homes and sending more than 2,900 people to hospitals with such symptoms as burning eyes and breathing problems.The stinging, smelly chemical poured out of the rail car for more than three hours -- sending up a cloud 1,000 feet high and up to 8 miles wide -- before rail yard workers were able to cap the leak.The thick chemical fog rolled east and north, growing larger as it spread through densely populated neighborhoods and industrial sections of Richmond, San Pablo, El Sobrante and Pinole, Calif.
NEWS
By Julie Stewart | February 1, 2001
WASHINGTON -- When a bit player in a drug deal gets nearly 20 years in prison, something's wrong with the system. That's what then-President Bill Clinton concluded when he commuted the sentence of Derrick Curry and 20 others serving lengthy mandatory prison sentences for drug crimes. Mr. Curry's case provides a good example of a wrong that plagues our criminal justice system -- a rigid sentencing system that incarcerates federal drug offenders for fixed, lengthy terms, regardless of the circumstances of their cases.
NEWS
By PETER A. JAY | September 25, 1994
Havre de Grace. -- On Wednesday, The Sun's columnist Ted Lippman called up and asked me if I had been born in Maryland. Uh oh, I thought. Here it comes. Brace yourself, you're going to be outed.Waffling would be futile, I knew. I've seen world-class practitioners at the top of their evasive game, and I know I'm not in their league. So I confessed. Not only was I not born in Maryland, but I was born in New York City.Ted, perhaps disarmed by my candor and recognizing the sensitivity of this stunning disclosure, kindly didn't publish my birthplace in the newspaper.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | May 16, 1997
A private safety inspector notified city school officials of serious inadequacies in an elementary school boiler system three weeks before the unit malfunctioned and severely burned a first-grader last June, according to records obtained by The Sun.State officials said yesterday that the accident could have been averted had the Hartford Steam Boiler Inspection and Insurance Co. followed regulations and promptly sent them a copy of the report."
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | May 31, 1994
~TC WASHINGTON -- It's a time-honored political axiom that when a president is in trouble or bogged down at home, it's wise to go abroad, where courtesy to a visiting leader is likely to replace criticism and may even produce adulation -- and a rise in the public opinion polls.Republican and Democratic presidents alike have resorted to this safety valve -- Richard M. Nixon and Lyndon B. Johnson, to mention two very obvious cases of chief executives who looked to less critical locales when things got a bit too tough in Washington.
SPORTS
By Laura Vecsey | November 16, 2004
RONNIE LOTT, Rod Woodson, Ed Reed. It may be premature, but it's tempting to check the list of Pro Bowl/Hall of Fame defensive backs who were big-hitting, ball-hawking game-breakers and wonder how and where Ravens safety Ed Reed stacks up. Two weeks. Two games. Two Ravens' wins, courtesy of No. 20. That doesn't even account for the sack, forced fumble and recovery Reed ran back 22 yards for a touchdown in the Ravens' win over the Redskins, a score that commenced a string of 17 unanswered points for the Ravens.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | August 28, 1999
If there is one player who personifies what Navy football is supposed to be about this year, it has to be Jamie Doffermyre.He is light but speedy. He was a virtual unknown who was recruited by the academy to play lacrosse, but wound up becoming the leading tackler and a major inspiration for the football team at safety. He is almost always out-weighed but never out-spirited."I'm kind of used to it," said the graduate of Arundel High. "I go 180 to 185 and last year against Notre Dame I gave away 40 pounds to the quarterback and 60 pounds to the fullback.
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | June 4, 1999
IF YOU are considering jumping into day trading, Alpesh Patel, a day trader himself, suggests that you first answer these questions: Can you spend three hours a day evaluating data to trade effectively?Can you afford to commit $5,000 to open an account?Do you have the temperament to engage in something so volatile?"Even successful day traders lose money in bad markets, so only try your hand at day trading if you can tolerate high risk and stress," Patel advises.MARKET WATCH:"Crossing of 10,000 by the Dow average was important, not because one index reached a big, fat round number, but because stocks climbed so much recently -- and so much of the advance was in a tiny number of stocks -- mostly large growth issues," notes Bradlee Perry of David L. Babson & Co. Inc."
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | August 28, 1999
If there is one player who personifies what Navy football is supposed to be about this year, it has to be Jamie Doffermyre.He is light but speedy. He was a virtual unknown who was recruited by the academy to play lacrosse, but wound up becoming the leading tackler and a major inspiration for the football team at safety. He is almost always out-weighed but never out-spirited."I'm kind of used to it," said the graduate of Arundel High. "I go 180 to 185 and last year against Notre Dame I gave away 40 pounds to the quarterback and 60 pounds to the fullback.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | May 16, 1997
A private safety inspector notified city school officials of serious inadequacies in an elementary school boiler system three weeks before the unit malfunctioned and severely burned a first-grader last June, according to records obtained by The Sun.State officials said yesterday that the accident could have been averted had the Hartford Steam Boiler Inspection and Insurance Co. followed regulations and promptly sent them a copy of the report."
NEWS
By PETER A. JAY | September 25, 1994
Havre de Grace. -- On Wednesday, The Sun's columnist Ted Lippman called up and asked me if I had been born in Maryland. Uh oh, I thought. Here it comes. Brace yourself, you're going to be outed.Waffling would be futile, I knew. I've seen world-class practitioners at the top of their evasive game, and I know I'm not in their league. So I confessed. Not only was I not born in Maryland, but I was born in New York City.Ted, perhaps disarmed by my candor and recognizing the sensitivity of this stunning disclosure, kindly didn't publish my birthplace in the newspaper.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | May 31, 1994
~TC WASHINGTON -- It's a time-honored political axiom that when a president is in trouble or bogged down at home, it's wise to go abroad, where courtesy to a visiting leader is likely to replace criticism and may even produce adulation -- and a rise in the public opinion polls.Republican and Democratic presidents alike have resorted to this safety valve -- Richard M. Nixon and Lyndon B. Johnson, to mention two very obvious cases of chief executives who looked to less critical locales when things got a bit too tough in Washington.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | July 27, 1993
RICHMOND, Calif. -- A huge white cloud of sulfuric acid spewed out of a ruptured railroad car yesterday, engulfing thousands of homes and sending more than 2,900 people to hospitals with such symptoms as burning eyes and breathing problems.The stinging, smelly chemical poured out of the rail car for more than three hours -- sending up a cloud 1,000 feet high and up to 8 miles wide -- before rail yard workers were able to cap the leak.The thick chemical fog rolled east and north, growing larger as it spread through densely populated neighborhoods and industrial sections of Richmond, San Pablo, El Sobrante and Pinole, Calif.
SPORTS
By ORLANDO SENTINEL | January 3, 2007
Sugar Bowl Matchup -- LSU (10-2) vs. Notre Dame (10-2) Site -- Superdome, New Orleans Time, TV -- 8 p.m., chs. 45, 5 The line -- LSU by 8 The game -- Notre Dame has lost eight consecutive bowl games and is trying to avoid becoming the first school to lose nine in a row. Irish QB Brady Quinn (35 TDs, five INTs, 63.4 percent completion rate) is the key to the Irish's hopes. He has an excellent trio of receivers in WRs Jeff Samardzija (70 catches, 11 TDs) and Rhema McKnight (64 catches, 15 TDs)
NEWS
September 16, 2000
THE PROTESTS shutting off gasoline supplies in Europe are popular with consumers, oil companies and OPEC governments. All parties resent the high taxes that European governments slap on oil products. This strike action was undertaken by small business proprietors such as farmers, truckers and commercial fishermen -- not against high prices in the oil field, but high taxes at the pump. That is not equivalent to American anguish over current gasoline prices. The European protesters are demanding prices and fuel taxes more nearly resembling ours.
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