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Safety Standards

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NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | October 15, 1994
MOSCOW -- Russian aviation boasts some of the world's smallest airlines, dirtiest planes, best pilots, worst weather conditions, remotest airports, most confusing bureaucracy, and best-trained but overstretched safety inspectors.Added up, it means that Russia meets international safety standards -- but barely -- according to a joint U.S.-Russian air safety report released yesterday.It means that flying in Russia is not quite so dangerous as some organizations, such as the U.S. Embassy in Moscow, had suggested.
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BUSINESS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2013
An $11.3 million federal grant announced Thursday will allow Baltimore Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport to upgrade a runway to meet safety standards. The grant, from the U.S. Department of Transportation, is part of a larger, $350 million project to upgrade all of BWI's runways to meet Federal Aviation Administration safety standards by 2015. The runway targeted in the grant announced Thursday is Runway 15R-33L. The money will pay for pavement rehabilitation, new grading and stormwater management, according to a joint announcement by U.S. Senators Barbara A. Mikulski and Ben Cardin, and Congressman John Sarbanes.
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NEWS
By The Washington Post | August 10, 2009
WASHINGTON -- Before June's deadly subway crash, no federal agency stepped in to ensure that the Metro commuter rail system found and fixed the electrical circuits now suspected of contributing to the worst accident in the system's history. That's because none is authorized to. Although the federal government regulates the safe operation of buses, Amtrak, airplanes and even ferries, it cedes primary oversight of subway safety to local panels - in the case of Metro, the little-known Tri-State Oversight Committee.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | February 16, 2013
The director of Baltimore's police training academy didn't know that instructors were holding exercises at an abandoned psychiatric hospital in Owings Mills. There were no supervisors on site. A police service weapon somehow got mixed up with a practice paint-cartridge pistol. The gun was pointed at a trainee. Many of the missteps surrounding the exercise at which a University of Maryland police recruit was critically wounded last week ran afoul of nationally recognized training safety standards, according to law enforcement experts and a review of past incidents from around the country.
BUSINESS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2013
An $11.3 million federal grant announced Thursday will allow Baltimore Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport to upgrade a runway to meet safety standards. The grant, from the U.S. Department of Transportation, is part of a larger, $350 million project to upgrade all of BWI's runways to meet Federal Aviation Administration safety standards by 2015. The runway targeted in the grant announced Thursday is Runway 15R-33L. The money will pay for pavement rehabilitation, new grading and stormwater management, according to a joint announcement by U.S. Senators Barbara A. Mikulski and Ben Cardin, and Congressman John Sarbanes.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and John Fritze and Annie Linskey and John Fritze,Sun reporters | June 28, 2007
Mayor Sheila Dixon said yesterday that she plans to make additional changes in the leadership of the city's Fire Department after a state agency charged that the department made "willful" violations of safety standards during a fatal training exercise. "There are a lot of changes that need to take place," she said. "Some of those changes have already begun." On Tuesday, the state's Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation concluded that the department had violated 33 safety standards during a live-burn training exercise in which a fire cadet was killed.
NEWS
By ORLANDO SENTINEL | June 19, 2005
ORLANDO, Fla. - For Orlando's famed attractions, finding a balance between excitement and safety is critical. The death of 4-year-old Daudi Bamuwamye on Monday after a ride on Mission: Space at Walt Disney World's Epcot immediately raised questions not only about the ride's safety, but also about how to judge what thrills are right for young visitors. Amusement-industry experts say that Disney, Universal Orlando and other parks spend years developing and testing rides, designing equipment that seldom causes problems.
NEWS
By Michael D. Towle and Michael D. Towle,Fort Worth Star-Telegram | October 18, 1994
WASHINGTON -- The Transportation Department said yesterday that more than 4.5 million General Motors pickup trucks on the road today have a severe design defect capable of killing drivers and passengers.Transportation Secretary Federico F. Pena said the department will hold a public hearing Dec. 6 in Washington to determine whether to order GM to recall its C/K pickup trucks, built %J between 1973 and 1987 with side-mounted fuel tanks.Mr. Pena said the government, through research by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, has determined that about 150 people have been killed because of the faulty design since the trucks were introduced.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | March 15, 2012
HBO's horse-racing series Luck, starring Dustin Hoffman, came to an abrupt end Wednesday after the death of a third horse during filming earlier in the week. Here's the statement issued by HBO: It is with heartbreak that executive producers David Milch and Michael Mann together with HBO have decided to cease all future production on the series LUCK.   Safety is always of paramount concern.  We maintained the highest safety standards throughout production, higher in fact than any protocols existing in horseracing anywhere with many fewer incidents than occur in racing or than befall horses normally in barns at night or pastures.  While we maintained the highest safety standards possible, accidents unfortunately happen and it is impossible to guarantee they won't in the future.  Accordingly, we have reached this difficult decision.    We are immensely proud of this series, the writing, the acting, the filmmaking, the celebration of the culture of horses, and everyone involved in its creation.    Quote from Michael Mann and David Milch:  “The two of us loved this series, loved the cast, crew and writers.  This has been a tremendous collaboration and one that we plan to continue in the future.” When asked for clarification via email, an HBO spokeswoman said this is the end of "Luck.
HEALTH
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | May 11, 2011
The Annapolis Public Housing Authority's board will vote Thursday on a plan to ban some window air conditioning units in three of the city's housing complexes in order to comply with federal and local safety standards — a proposal that many residents are rallying against. Carl Snowden, chairman of the board, said he plans to vote for the ban, which would affect about 344 apartments in Robinwood, Newtowne 20 and Eastport Terrace, because the units pose a serious safety issue. Snowden said the city fire marshall and federal housing policy requires at least two emergency exits in the case of a fire or other emergency.
BUSINESS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2012
BWI has received a $12 million grant from the U.S. Department of Transportation to help pay for the repaving of its longest runway, members of Maryland's congressional delegation announced Wednesday. Work on Runway 10-28, the 10,502-foot asphalt strip that extends east to west, will begin in late August and is set to be completed before the Thanksgiving travel rush. The runway repaving is expected to cost $40.3 million and support more than 500 jobs. "This is a big project and those federal dollars are really important.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | March 15, 2012
HBO's horse-racing series Luck, starring Dustin Hoffman, came to an abrupt end Wednesday after the death of a third horse during filming earlier in the week. Here's the statement issued by HBO: It is with heartbreak that executive producers David Milch and Michael Mann together with HBO have decided to cease all future production on the series LUCK.   Safety is always of paramount concern.  We maintained the highest safety standards throughout production, higher in fact than any protocols existing in horseracing anywhere with many fewer incidents than occur in racing or than befall horses normally in barns at night or pastures.  While we maintained the highest safety standards possible, accidents unfortunately happen and it is impossible to guarantee they won't in the future.  Accordingly, we have reached this difficult decision.    We are immensely proud of this series, the writing, the acting, the filmmaking, the celebration of the culture of horses, and everyone involved in its creation.    Quote from Michael Mann and David Milch:  “The two of us loved this series, loved the cast, crew and writers.  This has been a tremendous collaboration and one that we plan to continue in the future.” When asked for clarification via email, an HBO spokeswoman said this is the end of "Luck.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2012
A Maryland doctors' group is pushing legislation to bolster the state's child safety seat laws, a move designed to better protect toddlers from head, neck and spinal injuries during accidents. The Maryland State Medical Society, also known as MedChi, wants the state to adopt recommendations made last year by the American Academy of Pediatrics. The recommendations include lengthening the amount of time young children have to stay in seats facing the rear of the car and raising the age that children should have to sit in the back seat.
HEALTH
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | May 11, 2011
The Annapolis Public Housing Authority's board will vote Thursday on a plan to ban some window air conditioning units in three of the city's housing complexes in order to comply with federal and local safety standards — a proposal that many residents are rallying against. Carl Snowden, chairman of the board, said he plans to vote for the ban, which would affect about 344 apartments in Robinwood, Newtowne 20 and Eastport Terrace, because the units pose a serious safety issue. Snowden said the city fire marshall and federal housing policy requires at least two emergency exits in the case of a fire or other emergency.
NEWS
September 14, 2010
U.S. Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood last week released the latest statistics on highway deaths and injuries with no small measure of pride. In 2009, the U.S. had its safest year on the roads with the fewest deaths since 1950 and the lowest death rate per miles traveled recorded since motor vehicles were mass produced in this country. Mr. LaHood and others in Washington were quick to credit their own safety initiatives. But they might also have expressed gratitude for the recession: Historically, traffic fatalities decline in period of economic decline (fewer jobs mean less commuting, fewer deliveries, etc.)
BUSINESS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2010
The year 2007 became known as "the year of the recall" when the Consumer Product Safety Commission issued warnings on 473 products, the highest annual number in a decade. Many of the voluntary recalls involved imported goods, including children's toys and jewelry that contained toxic lead-based paint. The public outcry led to passage the next year of the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act, which put in place tougher penalties and requirements for an array of products. Inez Tenenbaum, who was sworn in to lead the commission last year, has implemented even more safeguards.
NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,SUN STAFF | August 11, 2000
The wading-pool-sized sandbox and its 10 tons of sand have been carted away. The twisting yellow slide - the one with the 16-foot-high, parental-heart-stopping ladder and sudden drop - has been torn down. The merry-go-round is next to go. The old, outdated playground equipment at Westminster City Park is being dismantled this week and replaced with 15 pieces of new, safer equipment. The equipment ranges from swings and slides to a climbing sphere. The playground will be completed by Aug. 18. The $80,000 project - funded in part by $40,000 in state Program Open Space money - is long overdue, according to Westminster`s recreation director, Ronald J. Schroers.
NEWS
By David G. Savage and David G. Savage,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 22, 2004
WASHINGTON - Mexican trucks and buses soon may be rolling throughout California and the Southwestern states, with the backing of President Bush and the Supreme Court. Bush administration lawyers urged the high court yesterday to lift a court order that has barred Mexican trucks from going beyond a 20-mile border zone, and none of the justices took sharp exception during the hourlong argument. If the Supreme Court sides with the administration, it could clear the way for thousands of Mexican trucks to deliver goods within the United States.
NEWS
By The Washington Post | August 10, 2009
WASHINGTON -- Before June's deadly subway crash, no federal agency stepped in to ensure that the Metro commuter rail system found and fixed the electrical circuits now suspected of contributing to the worst accident in the system's history. That's because none is authorized to. Although the federal government regulates the safe operation of buses, Amtrak, airplanes and even ferries, it cedes primary oversight of subway safety to local panels - in the case of Metro, the little-known Tri-State Oversight Committee.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,Sun reporter | August 22, 2007
Baltimore's fire chief defended his beleaguered department yesterday after an independent investigation concluded that a recruit who was killed in a training exercise had been poorly trained and outfitted. But Mayor Sheila Dixon said her "confidence level" in the chief's leadership "is very questionable." Dixon said she also had concerns about the judgments made by firefighters who were at the Feb. 9 fire in a vacant rowhouse on South Calverton Road that killed cadet Racheal M. Wilson and indicated more discipline could be meted out in the coming days.
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