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NEWS
July 28, 2014
It didn't take Democrats much time to denounce Rep. Paul Ryan's latest plan for addressing poverty in this country. The main feature of the Republican's proposed "Opportunity Grant" would be to roll a lot of social welfare programs together and leave it mostly to states to decide how the money is spent, which sounds a great deal like the block grant proposals of the past. Critics included Maryland's own Rep. Chris Van Hollen, ranking member on the House Budget Committee, who said the former vice presidential nominee has used the mantra of "reform" as a cover to cut safety-net programs.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 31, 2014
Thank you for your thoughtful, balanced editorial on Republican Rep. Paul Ryan's recent discussion of poverty ( "Ryan's safety net," July 28). A quick read of Congressman Ryan's proposal show his appreciation of the federal Earned Income Tax Credit as an effective strategy for helping low-income working families rise out of poverty or at least improve their economic security. However, Mr. Ryan's proposals for SNAP (formerly food stamps) are, as noted by Democratic Rep. Chris Van Hollen, problematic in that they remove protections for poor families who need such food assistance.
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NEWS
October 14, 2013
Susan Reimer 's thoughtful column ("How much are they worth to you?" Oct. 9) reminded this reader how fortunate my Baby Boom generation has been that the federal government provides so many services for our elderly parents. Without them, we would have long ago had to start making even more agonizing choices between pursuing our dreams and caring for Mom and Dad. These programs have made us all, boomers and the World War II generation, much freer in our personal lives. Conservatives often deride federal programs like Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid, and the state programs that supplement them, as "entitlement programs," implying that the increased government power and taxes necessary to run them somehow make us less free.
NEWS
July 31, 2014
I just finished reading Paul Ryan's discussion draft of "Expanding Opportunity in America" referred to in your editorial ( "Ryan's safety net," July 28). In addition to discussions of the social safety net and the Earned Income Tax Credit, there are also thought-provoking recommendations about education, criminal justice and regulatory reform. It ought to be required reading for all informed, unbiased citizens. Lyle Rescott, Marriottsville - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2011
The play — a 54-yard touchdown pass from Notre Dame quarterback Tommy Rees to wide receiver Michael Floyd — helped turn a one-touchdown deficit for Navy into a 56-14 loss. Floyd, a talented junior who many expect to be a high pick in the NFL draft, burned Parrish Gaines, a freshman cornerback making his first college start. But the Navy player who took the heat, and ultimately the responsibility, for the second-quarter play last Saturday in South Bend, Ind., was senior safety Kwesi Mitchell.
NEWS
October 1, 1991
For thousands of Marylanders, the impact of the cutbacks Gov. William Donald Schaefer unveiled to legislative leaders yesterday will be a free-fall into economic despair and uncertainty about government's obligations to society. TC significant portion of Maryland's social safety net is being removed.Wiping out the state's welfare and health programs for 24,000 disabled or working poor Marylanders could prove disastrous for most, since they do not qualify for federal public assistance. Cuts in grants to local health departments will mean fewer doctors and nurses to treat the state's poor.
NEWS
December 30, 2002
GOV.-ELECT Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. promises to hold many Marylanders harmless as he battles a yawning, $1.8-billion deficit. He'll spare taxpayers: There'll be no increased sales or personal income levy, he says. He won't penalize local governments - if they support his slot machine initiative. He wants to avoid laying off state employees. And public safety and education are immune from spending cuts. But what of the state's neediest? What protections are offered to them? If the new administration must make deep cuts in government programs, as much as $500 million according to some estimates, programs for the poor could be in jeopardy.
NEWS
March 29, 1993
A point stated here before deserves repeating: For all its affluence, its amenities, its excellent schools, Howard County is not immune to the social ills that afflict less prosperous jurisdictions.Since early in the recession, the county has seen marked increases in various categories of woe: Greater unemployment. More recipients of Aid to Families with Dependent Children. More residents on food stamps and General Public Assistance. Homeless people turned away from shelters. More children eligible for free or reduced-price meals at public schools.
NEWS
February 23, 1995
It has been a month since Gov. Parris Glendening proposed eliminating the $35 million Disability Assistance and Loan Program (DALP) and its $13 million companion health care program. Except for efforts to restore partial medical coverage for DALP recipients, the contingency plan promised by the governor to ease the pain of these cuts seems to have been forgotten. Carolyn Davis, a deputy chief of staff, told a Senate panel this week the governor at this stage has no specific plan in mind and will spend no money to implement any plan.
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Staff writer | October 6, 1991
Debbie Turner considers herself lucky.Even with Gov. William Donald Schaefer -- who makes $120,000 a year -- trimming the amount of money she takes in from Aid to Families with Dependent Children, the Westminster mother of two is glad to be getting anything."
NEWS
July 30, 2014
It is not surprising that The Sun would want to spend even more money on the Earned Income Tax Credit, despite the fact that the Treasury Department reports that one-fourth of the recipients get the credit fraudulently ( "Ryan's safety net," July 30). Fraud accounted for at least $13 billion in the 2013 tax year alone. I suppose the one-fourth fraudulent rate for the EITC is considered a grand success by The Sun. Perhaps everyone could agree the EITC should be expanded as long as the safeguards are improved to prevent those unqualified from receiving the credit.
NEWS
July 28, 2014
It didn't take Democrats much time to denounce Rep. Paul Ryan's latest plan for addressing poverty in this country. The main feature of the Republican's proposed "Opportunity Grant" would be to roll a lot of social welfare programs together and leave it mostly to states to decide how the money is spent, which sounds a great deal like the block grant proposals of the past. Critics included Maryland's own Rep. Chris Van Hollen, ranking member on the House Budget Committee, who said the former vice presidential nominee has used the mantra of "reform" as a cover to cut safety-net programs.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | June 16, 2014
These days, I find myself looking back on my father's work life with a mix of nostalgia and envy. He worked for 40 years for the same company and never worried that Alcoa would go out of business or that his industry would become obsolete. He had setbacks in his upward mobility, but he never worried about being laid off. He married, bought a house and raised four daughters. His ego was bruised when he was asked to retire early, but then soothed by the generous settlement and retirement package.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | April 25, 2014
State financial regulators and the attorney general issued a warning Friday about bitcoin and other virtual currencies, saying buyers - and sellers - should be careful. "For now, there is little to no regulation and no safety net for consumers or investors who lose their money dabbling in virtual currency such as Bitcoin," Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler said in a statement. Mark Kaufman, Maryland's commissioner of financial regulation, said in that statement that the state doesn't regulate virtual currencies but is examining issues related to them.
NEWS
October 14, 2013
Susan Reimer 's thoughtful column ("How much are they worth to you?" Oct. 9) reminded this reader how fortunate my Baby Boom generation has been that the federal government provides so many services for our elderly parents. Without them, we would have long ago had to start making even more agonizing choices between pursuing our dreams and caring for Mom and Dad. These programs have made us all, boomers and the World War II generation, much freer in our personal lives. Conservatives often deride federal programs like Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid, and the state programs that supplement them, as "entitlement programs," implying that the increased government power and taxes necessary to run them somehow make us less free.
NEWS
By Vann R. Ellison | July 9, 2013
Can government solve the problem of poverty in America? It is a question worth asking because partisan politics is eroding the federal government's lead role in developing the social welfare policies that have defined much of the country's domestic agenda since the 20th century. Witness the collapse of the Farm Bill in the U.S. House of Representatives last month due to partisan acrimony over its largest spending component, the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, commonly known as food stamps.
NEWS
By Lane Windham | January 28, 2013
You wouldn't know it from our nation's debate over Obamacare, but the U.S. has had government-supported health care for nearly 80 years. Not only that, but our nation bolsters a retirement level well beyond the thin safety net provided by Social Security, and it even ensures Americans a path to a family-supporting wage. And, no, I have not mistaken the U.S. for a socialist European nation. Our government assures us these broad economic benefits by guaranteeing our right to form a labor union.
NEWS
Lionel Foster | December 13, 2012
Last week, while driving to work, I heard an NPR story that included snippets of an interview with a woman who had just applied for a marriage license. This would not have been newsworthy if not for the fact that she was gay. On Nov. 6, voters in Washington, Maryland and Maine approved marriage equality laws. Last Thursday was the first day that gay and lesbian couples in Washington state could fill out forms and exercise their new right. It was a very long time coming, so I would have forgiven the woman for screaming with joy or drenching the microphone in tears, but that's not what she did. I didn't catch her name or what town she was from, but give or take a syllable, she said something like this: "It feels good to finally be normal," happily and wearily, as if she had finally set down a very heavy weight.
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