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By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | January 8, 2013
Baltimore County classrooms would have about 100 more teachers next school year under a budget proposal unveiled Tuesday by Superintendent Dallas Dance. In his first spending plan since taking the post, Dance presented a $1.3 billion operating budget to the county school board, saying a top priority will be managing growth in the school system of 107,000 students. Dance, who became superintendent this summer, is advocating spending about $4.7 million on additional teachers because of projected increases in student enrollment.
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NEWS
February 1, 2014
Dominion Resources Inc.'s plan to build a liquefied natural gas export terminal at Cove Point in Calvert County is hotly controversial among Marylanders ("Cove Point project opponents raise safety concerns," Jan. 26). The project would create more demand for gas retrieved by the controversial process of hydraulic fracturing or "fracking. " Though championed by Dominion as an economic gain, the project would raise gas prices in Maryland in addition to encouraging fracking. The question remains, what would Dominion's plan really mean for Maryland?
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FEATURES
By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe and Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe,Contributing Writers | May 4, 1993
Q: It's Little League baseball season again, and I let my enthusiastic 8-year-old sign up; but I couldn't help wondering if it was the right thing to do. He wanted to join because his friends play, but I'm not really sure team sports at such an early age are a good thing. What do you think?A: Your son's eagerness to do what his friends are doing is perfectly normal, but we respect your thoughtfulness about his activities. Our general recommendation would be to let your son try baseball while carefully monitoring his experience.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | January 8, 2013
Baltimore County classrooms would have about 100 more teachers next school year under a budget proposal unveiled Tuesday by Superintendent Dallas Dance. In his first spending plan since taking the post, Dance presented a $1.3 billion operating budget to the county school board, saying a top priority will be managing growth in the school system of 107,000 students. Dance, who became superintendent this summer, is advocating spending about $4.7 million on additional teachers because of projected increases in student enrollment.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | June 4, 2012
The Anne Arundel County Council is considering requiring pool operators to keep defibrillators among their safety equipment. "The most important job of government is to protect public health and safety, and this legislation is a common-sense solution to save lives," said Country Executive John R. Leopold, at whose request "Connor's Law" was introduced Monday. The bill named for Connor John-James Freed, a 5-year-old who drowned in Crofton in 2006. A lifeguard at the Crofton Country Club can be heard on the 911 recording saying that the pool had an automatic external defibrillator but she was not allowed to use it because she was not trained in its use. The Red Cross now requires training on the devices.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2011
Hot pink ribbon-like patches sprouted Monday on life vests at the Severn Sailing Association in Annapolis as junior sailors prepared for practice, bright remembrances of the 14-year-old student who died last week in an accident during practice. Friends of Olivia Constants made dozens of patches, decorating them with fabric paint and marker to note her dates of birth and death. The club's junior sailing program, where Olivia was in the top level for junior racers using the Club 420 sailboat, will be closed Tuesday for Olivia's funeral.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,Candy.thomson@baltsun.com | August 5, 2009
With three months left in the active boating season, Maryland has exceeded last year's total number of fatalities and is on its way to its deadliest year since 2005. Ten people have died on the state's waterways, one more than last year, despite safety campaigns and concentrated enforcement by Natural Resources Police. In the majority of the accidents - including one last month involving an 11-year-old girl - the victims were not wearing life jackets. The death toll concerns NRP officers because of its geographical sweep, from Deep Creek Lake to Eastern Shore rivers, and because of the wide variety of contributing factors, including poor judgment and weather.
NEWS
February 1, 2014
Dominion Resources Inc.'s plan to build a liquefied natural gas export terminal at Cove Point in Calvert County is hotly controversial among Marylanders ("Cove Point project opponents raise safety concerns," Jan. 26). The project would create more demand for gas retrieved by the controversial process of hydraulic fracturing or "fracking. " Though championed by Dominion as an economic gain, the project would raise gas prices in Maryland in addition to encouraging fracking. The question remains, what would Dominion's plan really mean for Maryland?
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN STAFF | May 5, 2005
Reacting to concerns about a surge of violence in Maryland's prisons, the Ehrlich administration is telling labor union officials it sees a need to better equip correctional officers but not to hire more staff to secure the institutions. In a letter to a top union official, administration executives said the officers' failure to follow department policy, rather than insufficient staffing, has contributed to some recent incidents of inmate violence. But officials said they agree that correctional officers' safety equipment -- such as radios, protective vests and security cameras -- must be upgraded and that they are moving to do that, starting this year.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2011
Like many Americans, Linda Billings has been following news of the unfolding crisis in earthquake-rocked Japan, where a crippled nuclear power plant teeters on the brink of a disastrous meltdown. But the 55-year-old Street resident is paying perhaps a bit more attention than most. Her home in northern Harford County is less than 10 miles from a similarly designed nuclear plant just across the border in Pennsylvania. "I've not worried about it, but perhaps I should," she said late last week.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | June 4, 2012
The Anne Arundel County Council is considering requiring pool operators to keep defibrillators among their safety equipment. "The most important job of government is to protect public health and safety, and this legislation is a common-sense solution to save lives," said Country Executive John R. Leopold, at whose request "Connor's Law" was introduced Monday. The bill named for Connor John-James Freed, a 5-year-old who drowned in Crofton in 2006. A lifeguard at the Crofton Country Club can be heard on the 911 recording saying that the pool had an automatic external defibrillator but she was not allowed to use it because she was not trained in its use. The Red Cross now requires training on the devices.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | February 18, 2012
The Chesapeake Paddlers Association, a nonprofit organization with more than 650 members and run strictly by volunteers, will hold Sea Kayaking 101, a class to teach the basics of the sport, March 10 in West River. The seven-hour workshop, which begins at 8:30 a.m. at the West River Center (5100 Chalk Point Road) will include experienced sea kayakers talking about how to get started in the fast-growing sport in terms of kayaks, paddles and other equipment. There will also be discussions about where to paddle, how to find fellow paddlers and the history of the sport.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2011
Hot pink ribbon-like patches sprouted Monday on life vests at the Severn Sailing Association in Annapolis as junior sailors prepared for practice, bright remembrances of the 14-year-old student who died last week in an accident during practice. Friends of Olivia Constants made dozens of patches, decorating them with fabric paint and marker to note her dates of birth and death. The club's junior sailing program, where Olivia was in the top level for junior racers using the Club 420 sailboat, will be closed Tuesday for Olivia's funeral.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2011
Like many Americans, Linda Billings has been following news of the unfolding crisis in earthquake-rocked Japan, where a crippled nuclear power plant teeters on the brink of a disastrous meltdown. But the 55-year-old Street resident is paying perhaps a bit more attention than most. Her home in northern Harford County is less than 10 miles from a similarly designed nuclear plant just across the border in Pennsylvania. "I've not worried about it, but perhaps I should," she said late last week.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,Candy.thomson@baltsun.com | August 5, 2009
With three months left in the active boating season, Maryland has exceeded last year's total number of fatalities and is on its way to its deadliest year since 2005. Ten people have died on the state's waterways, one more than last year, despite safety campaigns and concentrated enforcement by Natural Resources Police. In the majority of the accidents - including one last month involving an 11-year-old girl - the victims were not wearing life jackets. The death toll concerns NRP officers because of its geographical sweep, from Deep Creek Lake to Eastern Shore rivers, and because of the wide variety of contributing factors, including poor judgment and weather.
NEWS
By HUGO MARTIN and HUGO MARTIN,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 28, 2006
College track star Kevin Dare shook the track and field world four years ago when he attempted to pole vault 15 feet, 7 inches during a Big 10 track meet in Minnesota. The vault was no record attempt. It was not even Dare's personal best. The jump was sadly unforgettable because Dare missed and was killed when he landed head first in the steel takeoff box that vaulters use to catapult themselves into the air. After years of debate on ways to make the sport safer, a standards panel approved in May the first specifications for a pole vaulting helmet, spurring production of several models.
NEWS
April 5, 2000
Richard Thomas Brown Sr., a retired safety equipment salesman, died Friday at his Lutherville home of lung cancer. He was 69. Mr. Brown, who sold protective gear such as harnesses and safety belts used by window washers, utility workers and firefighters, retired in 1994 from Miller Equipment Co. where he had worked for more than a decade. He began his business career with Union Carbide Co. in 1958 and was transferred to Baltimore in 1966. Born and raised in the Bronx, N.Y., he earned a bachelor's degree from New York University's School of Commerce.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | August 13, 1999
A Maryland company that has been accused in lawsuits of bilking customers in a slick sales scheme has closed two of its three offices in Maryland amid rumblings that three government agencies are considering investigations.Global Security Inc., which suggests that prospective applicants can "walk the road to riches" after paying up to $12,000 in start-up fees, abruptly closed its offices in Glen Burnie and Towson this week. An office in Laurel remains open."We were forced to shut offices down because of the bad publicity," said Paul W. Janoski, one of two chief executives at Global Security, referring to a Sunday story in The Sun that detailed the company's business practices.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN STAFF | May 5, 2005
Reacting to concerns about a surge of violence in Maryland's prisons, the Ehrlich administration is telling labor union officials it sees a need to better equip correctional officers but not to hire more staff to secure the institutions. In a letter to a top union official, administration executives said the officers' failure to follow department policy, rather than insufficient staffing, has contributed to some recent incidents of inmate violence. But officials said they agree that correctional officers' safety equipment -- such as radios, protective vests and security cameras -- must be upgraded and that they are moving to do that, starting this year.
NEWS
April 5, 2000
Richard Thomas Brown Sr., a retired safety equipment salesman, died Friday at his Lutherville home of lung cancer. He was 69. Mr. Brown, who sold protective gear such as harnesses and safety belts used by window washers, utility workers and firefighters, retired in 1994 from Miller Equipment Co. where he had worked for more than a decade. He began his business career with Union Carbide Co. in 1958 and was transferred to Baltimore in 1966. Born and raised in the Bronx, N.Y., he earned a bachelor's degree from New York University's School of Commerce.
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