Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSafety Commission
IN THE NEWS

Safety Commission

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By BOSTON GLOBE | July 21, 1996
The federal government, in a reversal of a long-standing position, has determined that escalators pose a special threat to children and is pushing for an overhaul of most of the country's 30,000 escalators.The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission concluded that escalators can be made less hazardous to children with the addition of safety devices that have been on the market but were never before required, according to documents obtained by the Globe."All of this information suggests that regular occurrences of entrapment, particularly of the legs and feet of small children, can be almost completely eliminated by the installation of aftermarket safety devices," the agency wrote in a letter this month to the chairman of the committee that sets the national escalator safety code.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2010
The year 2007 became known as "the year of the recall" when the Consumer Product Safety Commission issued warnings on 473 products, the highest annual number in a decade. Many of the voluntary recalls involved imported goods, including children's toys and jewelry that contained toxic lead-based paint. The public outcry led to passage the next year of the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act, which put in place tougher penalties and requirements for an array of products. Inez Tenenbaum, who was sworn in to lead the commission last year, has implemented even more safeguards.
Advertisement
NEWS
By TRENA JOHNSON and TRENA JOHNSON,SUN STAFF | June 27, 1999
Latex balloons are a great joy for people of all ages, but for small children, they pose a great risk. Toddlers not only play with balloons, they like to bite them, too. And when balloons pop, as they inevitably do, some children put pieces of the latex in their mouths and choke. In fact, safety experts say, latex balloons kill more small children than any other toy.So many safety warnings about balloons have been published in newspapers and magazines that the maker of Barney the purple dinosaur goods -- Lyrick Studios/ Lyons Group in Allen, Texas, -- has removed latex balloons from its list of party-pack enclosures.
NEWS
By Rena Steinzor | September 28, 2008
An interesting subplot in the story of Wall Street's troubles is that suddenly everybody's in favor of federal regulation. Conservative advocates of deregulation, who had never met a federal regulation that they didn't think was "intrusive," "harmful to the economy" or a "federal power grab" now stand shoulder-to-shoulder with lifelong advocates of sensible safeguards. It's been almost three decades since knee-jerk opposition to federal regulation became a staple of conservative politics.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder News Service | January 31, 1992
Washington -- Baby Boomers who once got down in the dirt to play marbles may be surprised to hear the government may soon get in the age-old game.The little glass balls are dangerous, warns a staff report of the Consumer Product Safety Commission. Between 1980 and 1991, children under age 10 choked to death on marbles, the agency reports.The government wants a stricter labeling law to warn parents. Already, a law exists requiring labels on small toys that pose a danger to children under 3, but marbles, small balls and balloons are excluded.
BUSINESS
By New York Times | August 15, 1991
Under an agreement reached with a federal consumer panel, the manufacturer of a popular home heater has agreed to repair up to 3.6 million of the oil-filled portable electric devices after government research indicated that they pose a fire hazard.The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission is expected to announce the repair program Thursday. The safety commission has investigated at least 30 reports of problems with the heaters, manufactured by DeLonghi SpA of Italy, including malfunctions and fires.
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | November 28, 1998
The DeWALT Industrial Tool Co. of Hampstead, a subsidiary of Black & Decker Corp., is recalling about 25,000 framing saws because of a faulty cutting-blade guard, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission said this week.The problem is that the lower blade guard on the saw can fail to fully close during use, leaving the blade exposed and presenting a risk of serious cuts to the user, the commission said.DeWALT has said that it is aware of 15 incidents in which the guard failed to close, with eight reports of lacerations and three cases in which stitches were required, according to the Washington-based safety commission.
FEATURES
By Beth Hannan Rimmels and Beth Hannan Rimmels,Special to The Sun | November 16, 1994
The consumer advocates dubbed "the Ralph Naders of the bridal industry" are trying to save people money again. The topic for Alan and Denise Fields this time? Babies.Despite being cute, cuddly and basic in their demands (eating, sleeping and needing cleaning), babies are very expensive, as the authors found out when they had their son, Benjamin, in 1993.How expensive? According to a study by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, $6,000 to $13,000 is spent on a child until the age of 3, and that doesn't include prenatal care or delivery costs.
BUSINESS
By JAMIE SMITH HOPKINS | May 23, 2008
Expecting a child? In the flurry of baby preparations, don't forget to childproof your home. The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission says that home hazards kill or injure about 2.5 million children every year. Here's what the commission and others suggest you do to make your house safe: * Bathrooms: Install a safety latch on the toilet seat and safety covers on the faucet handles - unless you're planning to keep Baby out altogether by putting a latch on the door, suggests the UCSF Children's Hospital in California.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | November 10, 1994
Each year, about 23,000 children ages 15 months and younger receive hospital emergency-room treatment for injuries caused by falls while secured in one of the most popular baby items available -- infant baby walkers. According to the Consumer Products Safety Commission, walkers account for more injuries than any other juvenile product on the market.Of those injuries, about 80 percent occurred when the walker and baby careened down a set of stairs; in many cases, that happened even when a gate was in place.
BUSINESS
By JAMIE SMITH HOPKINS | May 23, 2008
Expecting a child? In the flurry of baby preparations, don't forget to childproof your home. The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission says that home hazards kill or injure about 2.5 million children every year. Here's what the commission and others suggest you do to make your house safe: * Bathrooms: Install a safety latch on the toilet seat and safety covers on the faucet handles - unless you're planning to keep Baby out altogether by putting a latch on the door, suggests the UCSF Children's Hospital in California.
NEWS
By TRENA JOHNSON and TRENA JOHNSON,SUN STAFF | June 27, 1999
Latex balloons are a great joy for people of all ages, but for small children, they pose a great risk. Toddlers not only play with balloons, they like to bite them, too. And when balloons pop, as they inevitably do, some children put pieces of the latex in their mouths and choke. In fact, safety experts say, latex balloons kill more small children than any other toy.So many safety warnings about balloons have been published in newspapers and magazines that the maker of Barney the purple dinosaur goods -- Lyrick Studios/ Lyons Group in Allen, Texas, -- has removed latex balloons from its list of party-pack enclosures.
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | November 28, 1998
The DeWALT Industrial Tool Co. of Hampstead, a subsidiary of Black & Decker Corp., is recalling about 25,000 framing saws because of a faulty cutting-blade guard, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission said this week.The problem is that the lower blade guard on the saw can fail to fully close during use, leaving the blade exposed and presenting a risk of serious cuts to the user, the commission said.DeWALT has said that it is aware of 15 incidents in which the guard failed to close, with eight reports of lacerations and three cases in which stitches were required, according to the Washington-based safety commission.
NEWS
By BOSTON GLOBE | July 21, 1996
The federal government, in a reversal of a long-standing position, has determined that escalators pose a special threat to children and is pushing for an overhaul of most of the country's 30,000 escalators.The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission concluded that escalators can be made less hazardous to children with the addition of safety devices that have been on the market but were never before required, according to documents obtained by the Globe."All of this information suggests that regular occurrences of entrapment, particularly of the legs and feet of small children, can be almost completely eliminated by the installation of aftermarket safety devices," the agency wrote in a letter this month to the chairman of the committee that sets the national escalator safety code.
NEWS
March 23, 1996
Consumer commission warns of toy safetyYour Feb. 22 editorial, ''Hot dog as child hazard,'' emphasized the choking hazard posed by hot dogs and other small objects swallowed by young children.As you correctly note, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) required that new warning labels be placed on toys that could choke small children. The warning labels appear on toys made for children from age 3 to under 6 years old if those toys pose a choking hazard to younger children. CPSC Chairman Ann Brown said, ''These labels tell parents two critical things: They let them know that a toy isn't safe for children under 3, and why it's not safe.
FEATURES
By KERRY DiGRAZIA and KERRY DiGRAZIA,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | September 28, 1995
"Nerd." "Geek." "Dork." "Dweeb."Ask the kids riding bicycles around Baltimore without a helmet why they're testing their luck and they're bound to say that strapping one on makes them feel like one of the above.Despite the well-known and well-tested safety benefits of helmets, only 15 percent of children wear a bike helmet, according to Consumer Product Safety Commission reports.Most kids who refuse to wear helmets do so because they think helmets are uncool. These image-conscious kids most likely learned to ride bare-headed and are reluctant to compromise image for safety.
FEATURES
By KERRY DiGRAZIA and KERRY DiGRAZIA,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | September 28, 1995
"Nerd." "Geek." "Dork." "Dweeb."Ask the kids riding bicycles around Baltimore without a helmet why they're testing their luck and they're bound to say that strapping one on makes them feel like one of the above.Despite the well-known and well-tested safety benefits of helmets, only 15 percent of children wear a bike helmet, according to Consumer Product Safety Commission reports.Most kids who refuse to wear helmets do so because they think helmets are uncool. These image-conscious kids most likely learned to ride bare-headed and are reluctant to compromise image for safety.
NEWS
By Rena Steinzor | September 28, 2008
An interesting subplot in the story of Wall Street's troubles is that suddenly everybody's in favor of federal regulation. Conservative advocates of deregulation, who had never met a federal regulation that they didn't think was "intrusive," "harmful to the economy" or a "federal power grab" now stand shoulder-to-shoulder with lifelong advocates of sensible safeguards. It's been almost three decades since knee-jerk opposition to federal regulation became a staple of conservative politics.
NEWS
August 29, 1995
It's FundamentalI don't know whether to laugh or cry after reading Louis Sheldon's (Opinion * Commentary Aug. 18th) suggesting that we need a Religious Equality Amendment. We already have one: It's called the First Amendment, which has two clauses referring to religion. One prevents the establishment of an explicit or implicit state religion, the other prohibits restrictions on the freedom of individual religious practices.Fundamentalists, whose faith seems to include a requirement that they shove their version of faith in everyone else's face, have never understood that the First Amendment protects their religion as well as anyone else's.
NEWS
July 25, 1995
Not My ViewThe July 6 editorial page included a very interesting political cartoon by KAL that perfectly illustrates the double standard that the liberals in this country practice on a daily basis.In the cartoon, irate rioters in support of the flag burning amendment, school prayer amendment and the balanced budget amendment assail the Constitution.Obviously, the artist who drew the cartoon believes that these amendments assault the freedoms guaranteed to him in the Constitution. I would like to ask where is the cartoon that points out the assaults on the Second, Fourth, Sixth, Eighth and 10th amendments that have been going on for years?
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.