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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 10, 2004
For the first time, federal regulators released figures yesterday that show how prone individual models of new cars and light-duty trucks are to roll over in an accident, exposing the occupants to high risk of death or serious injury. Instead of assigning a star rating to each model it tests, as it has done in the past, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration released figures that allow consumers to compare rollover risk model by model. The star system, which is continuing, has been criticized for not providing enough information to distinguish among different vehicles, because nearly all received either three or four stars.
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NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | March 9, 2004
Federal investigators looking into Saturday's fatal capsizing of a water taxi on Baltimore's Inner Harbor are examining the design of the two-hulled Lady D and may study the safety record of similar pontoon boats nationally. Some other water taxi services - including those in Delaware, Chicago, Boston Harbor, Fort Lauderdale, Fla., and Vancouver, Canada - use larger, conventional-hulled boats, which some captains consider more stable in high winds and choppy waters than smaller boats with raised platforms atop pairs of torpedo-shaped floats.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Tom Pelton and Jonathan Bor and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | July 31, 2001
The Johns Hopkins University is investigating a researcher who tested an experimental anti-cancer drug on patients in India without seeking the permission of an internal review board that considers the safety of human studies, a spokesman said yesterday. The experiment, which was conducted on 26 patients in 1999 and 2000, sought to determine whether a chemical derived from the creosote plant could stop the growth of oral cancer. Ru Chih C. Huang, a Hopkins biology professor, said yesterday that she did not submit her study to a Hopkins review board because it was approved by a similar panel at the Indian cancer center where the trial was performed.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 19, 1996
MIAMI -- Passengers' terrified shouts of "Fire! Fire! Fire!" echoed from the smoke-filled cabin as flames spread rapidly through a ValuJet airliner over the Florida Everglades in May, transcripts of cockpit recordings revealed yesterday."
NEWS
By Mark A. Steinand Eric Malnic and Mark A. Steinand Eric Malnic,Los Angeles Times | February 10, 1991
LOS ANGELES -- Trembling in shock and smoking a cigarette, Robin Lee Wascher sat in a Los Angeles airport control tower office after guiding two airliners onto the same runway and seeing them collide in a ball of flame."
NEWS
By Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel | January 13, 1992
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. -- "Palm 90" probably wouldn't be remembered as one of the most horrifying air disasters if a handful of heroes had not saved a few survivors from the icy Potomac River.But this was real-life drama, a story of tragedy and triumph, captured on camera in the nation's capital.In turn, "Palm 90," the air traffic control code name for Air Florida's Flight 90, is still a vivid memory 10 years later for many across the country. It crashed Jan. 13, 1982, killing 78, including four on the ground.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Staff Writer | June 16, 1993
It was supposed to be a milk run.For Conrail engineer Ricky L. Gates, the Sunday trip from Baltimore to Harrisburg was a four- or five-hour job that would net him two days' pay under union rules."
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | May 8, 1991
LOS ANGELES -- In dramatic testimony yesterday, an air traffic controller accepted blame for February's fatal runway collision in Los Angeles and the co-pilot of one plane told how his pilot died in the flaming wreckage.It was the first public appearance by the 38-year-old controller, Robin Lee Wascher, since the accident and the first time she acknowledged publicly that her mistake had led to the crash.Federal investigators say that because of her confusion, Ms. Wascher positioned a SkyWest commuter liner on the same Los Angeles International Airport runway on which she had just cleared a USAir Boeing 737 jetliner to land.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | February 26, 2013
Years after a multimillion-dollar contract to replace the state's fleet of aged medevac helicopters caused controversy in Annapolis, two newly purchased aircraft arrived Tuesday at the aviation command of the Maryland State Police. Four more are expected to fly into the police facility at Martin State Airport in Middle River this week, state police said — behind initial schedules for the new fleet's arrival. The four remaining AW139 helicopters of the 10 purchased by the state for $121.7 million also will arrive soon, said Greg Shipley, a state police spokesman.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun Staff Correspondent | September 20, 1994
CHARLOTTE, N.C. -- Seconds before a USAir DC-9 airliner crashed in a sudden, violent thunderstorm here July 2, the plane's captain abruptly took over the controls from the first officer without giving a verbal warning, according to cockpit tapes and a federal investigators' report released yesterday.The report was issued as the National Transportation Safety Board began public hearings into a fiery accident that killed 37 of the 60 people aboard USAir Flight 1016 from Columbia, S.C., to Charlotte/Douglas International Airport.
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