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By Mark A. Steinand Eric Malnic and Mark A. Steinand Eric Malnic,Los Angeles Times | February 10, 1991
LOS ANGELES -- Trembling in shock and smoking a cigarette, Robin Lee Wascher sat in a Los Angeles airport control tower office after guiding two airliners onto the same runway and seeing them collide in a ball of flame."
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NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | March 9, 2004
Federal investigators looking into Saturday's fatal capsizing of a water taxi on Baltimore's Inner Harbor are examining the design of the two-hulled Lady D and may study the safety record of similar pontoon boats nationally. Some other water taxi services - including those in Delaware, Chicago, Boston Harbor, Fort Lauderdale, Fla., and Vancouver, Canada - use larger, conventional-hulled boats, which some captains consider more stable in high winds and choppy waters than smaller boats with raised platforms atop pairs of torpedo-shaped floats.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Tom Pelton and Jonathan Bor and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | July 31, 2001
The Johns Hopkins University is investigating a researcher who tested an experimental anti-cancer drug on patients in India without seeking the permission of an internal review board that considers the safety of human studies, a spokesman said yesterday. The experiment, which was conducted on 26 patients in 1999 and 2000, sought to determine whether a chemical derived from the creosote plant could stop the growth of oral cancer. Ru Chih C. Huang, a Hopkins biology professor, said yesterday that she did not submit her study to a Hopkins review board because it was approved by a similar panel at the Indian cancer center where the trial was performed.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 19, 1996
MIAMI -- Passengers' terrified shouts of "Fire! Fire! Fire!" echoed from the smoke-filled cabin as flames spread rapidly through a ValuJet airliner over the Florida Everglades in May, transcripts of cockpit recordings revealed yesterday."
NEWS
By Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel | January 13, 1992
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. -- "Palm 90" probably wouldn't be remembered as one of the most horrifying air disasters if a handful of heroes had not saved a few survivors from the icy Potomac River.But this was real-life drama, a story of tragedy and triumph, captured on camera in the nation's capital.In turn, "Palm 90," the air traffic control code name for Air Florida's Flight 90, is still a vivid memory 10 years later for many across the country. It crashed Jan. 13, 1982, killing 78, including four on the ground.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN and FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN,SUN REPORTER | March 4, 2006
The recent death of Capt. Paul J. Esbensen, 76, of Stevensville, who was a highly respected wreck investigator with the National Transportation Safety Board and a well-known port figure, recalled his role investigating the loss of the SS Poet more than two decades ago. He had spent 15 years as senior marine investigator for the NTSB before retiring in 1996. During his tenure with the NTSB, he investigated 25 major maritime accidents, including the Poet and the loss of the Pride of Baltimore.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | May 8, 1991
LOS ANGELES -- In dramatic testimony yesterday, an air traffic controller accepted blame for February's fatal runway collision in Los Angeles and the co-pilot of one plane told how his pilot died in the flaming wreckage.It was the first public appearance by the 38-year-old controller, Robin Lee Wascher, since the accident and the first time she acknowledged publicly that her mistake had led to the crash.Federal investigators say that because of her confusion, Ms. Wascher positioned a SkyWest commuter liner on the same Los Angeles International Airport runway on which she had just cleared a USAir Boeing 737 jetliner to land.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 31, 2014
A worn and fractured rail along train tracks through Ellicott City caused the coal train derailment that killed two women in 2012, the National Transportation Safety Board said Thursday. In its final report on the accident, the NTSB said it found evidence that the section of CSX Transportation rail showed signs of "gradual deterioration of the rail-head surface" from passing trains. The finding makes official preliminary conclusions about a rail break contributing to the accident that were released in a docket of investigatory documents last month.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | August 10, 2013
The pilot involved in a fatal northeastern Pennsylvania helicopter crash that killed five people, including three Marylanders, didn't follow federal regulations when planning and making the flight, the National Transportation Safety Board said in a preliminary report. The investigators said the pilot on the trip, which ended in a crash in Noxen, Pa., near Scranton, was not certified to fly using only on-board instruments — a type of advanced certification required when visibility is low. The pilot also did not file a flight plan with federal officials for the trip, investigators said.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | March 7, 2014
At least one local business is planning to fly drones over Baltimore after a judge ruled that there is no law prohibiting the commercial use of small unmanned aircraft. Terry Kilby, who with his wife, Belinda, published a book last year of aerial photographs of the city taken by unmanned aircraft, said Friday that they would launch their "rent-a-drone" operation next week. "It's really a great day for all of us that are in this industry," he said. "We've seen lots of companies go bankrupt waiting for this to happen, and it's a nice relief now to see this.
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