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NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | March 9, 2004
Federal investigators looking into Saturday's fatal capsizing of a water taxi on Baltimore's Inner Harbor are examining the design of the two-hulled Lady D and may study the safety record of similar pontoon boats nationally. Some other water taxi services - including those in Delaware, Chicago, Boston Harbor, Fort Lauderdale, Fla., and Vancouver, Canada - use larger, conventional-hulled boats, which some captains consider more stable in high winds and choppy waters than smaller boats with raised platforms atop pairs of torpedo-shaped floats.
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NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Tom Pelton and Jonathan Bor and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | July 31, 2001
The Johns Hopkins University is investigating a researcher who tested an experimental anti-cancer drug on patients in India without seeking the permission of an internal review board that considers the safety of human studies, a spokesman said yesterday. The experiment, which was conducted on 26 patients in 1999 and 2000, sought to determine whether a chemical derived from the creosote plant could stop the growth of oral cancer. Ru Chih C. Huang, a Hopkins biology professor, said yesterday that she did not submit her study to a Hopkins review board because it was approved by a similar panel at the Indian cancer center where the trial was performed.
NEWS
By Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel | January 13, 1992
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. -- "Palm 90" probably wouldn't be remembered as one of the most horrifying air disasters if a handful of heroes had not saved a few survivors from the icy Potomac River.But this was real-life drama, a story of tragedy and triumph, captured on camera in the nation's capital.In turn, "Palm 90," the air traffic control code name for Air Florida's Flight 90, is still a vivid memory 10 years later for many across the country. It crashed Jan. 13, 1982, killing 78, including four on the ground.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 19, 1996
MIAMI -- Passengers' terrified shouts of "Fire! Fire! Fire!" echoed from the smoke-filled cabin as flames spread rapidly through a ValuJet airliner over the Florida Everglades in May, transcripts of cockpit recordings revealed yesterday."
NEWS
By Mark A. Steinand Eric Malnic and Mark A. Steinand Eric Malnic,Los Angeles Times | February 10, 1991
LOS ANGELES -- Trembling in shock and smoking a cigarette, Robin Lee Wascher sat in a Los Angeles airport control tower office after guiding two airliners onto the same runway and seeing them collide in a ball of flame."
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN and FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN,SUN REPORTER | March 4, 2006
The recent death of Capt. Paul J. Esbensen, 76, of Stevensville, who was a highly respected wreck investigator with the National Transportation Safety Board and a well-known port figure, recalled his role investigating the loss of the SS Poet more than two decades ago. He had spent 15 years as senior marine investigator for the NTSB before retiring in 1996. During his tenure with the NTSB, he investigated 25 major maritime accidents, including the Poet and the loss of the Pride of Baltimore.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Staff Writer | September 24, 1993
MOBILE, Ala. -- An assistant towboat operator -- licensed for a year -- guided a barge into a railroad bridge and then radioed for help 12 minutes before the span collapsed beneath the Sunset Limited, investigators said yesterday."
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2012
Ellicott City's historic center braced for a difficult, days-long cleanup of coal, overturned train cars and smashed vehicles after a Tuesday train derailment that crushed two 19-year-old women to death on a bridge. Investigators said the town's uneven topography along the Patapsco River in Howard County added obstacles to an already complex recovery. In addition to the cleanup efforts, local state and federal officials began an investigation into the deaths, the derailment, and the potential impact of thousands of pounds of coal on local waterways.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells and Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2013
Thunderstorms and heavy fog were rolling through northeastern Pennsylvania's rugged terrain Saturday night when a small helicopter crashed, killing all five people on board, including three from the Baltimore area. The local medical examiner's office identified the passengers as Bernard Michael Kelly, 58, of Ellicott City; his daughter, Leanna Mee Kelly, 27, of Savage; David Ernest Jenny Jr., 30, of Towson; Carl Robert Woodland, 29, of Lovettsville, Va.; and his son, Noah Robert McKain Woodland, 3. It's too soon for investigators to say if the bad weather and reduced visibility played a role in the accident near Noxen, Pa., just west of Scranton.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Staff Writer | December 21, 1993
PATUXENT RIVER NAVAL AIR STATION -- The blame for the sinking of the El Toro II must be shared by the Coast Guard, the boat's insurance company and the owner, lawyers for the victims' families said yesterday."
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