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By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | March 9, 2004
Federal investigators looking into Saturday's fatal capsizing of a water taxi on Baltimore's Inner Harbor are examining the design of the two-hulled Lady D and may study the safety record of similar pontoon boats nationally. Some other water taxi services - including those in Delaware, Chicago, Boston Harbor, Fort Lauderdale, Fla., and Vancouver, Canada - use larger, conventional-hulled boats, which some captains consider more stable in high winds and choppy waters than smaller boats with raised platforms atop pairs of torpedo-shaped floats.
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NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Tom Pelton and Jonathan Bor and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | July 31, 2001
The Johns Hopkins University is investigating a researcher who tested an experimental anti-cancer drug on patients in India without seeking the permission of an internal review board that considers the safety of human studies, a spokesman said yesterday. The experiment, which was conducted on 26 patients in 1999 and 2000, sought to determine whether a chemical derived from the creosote plant could stop the growth of oral cancer. Ru Chih C. Huang, a Hopkins biology professor, said yesterday that she did not submit her study to a Hopkins review board because it was approved by a similar panel at the Indian cancer center where the trial was performed.
NEWS
By Mark A. Steinand Eric Malnic and Mark A. Steinand Eric Malnic,Los Angeles Times | February 10, 1991
LOS ANGELES -- Trembling in shock and smoking a cigarette, Robin Lee Wascher sat in a Los Angeles airport control tower office after guiding two airliners onto the same runway and seeing them collide in a ball of flame."
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN and FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN,SUN REPORTER | March 4, 2006
The recent death of Capt. Paul J. Esbensen, 76, of Stevensville, who was a highly respected wreck investigator with the National Transportation Safety Board and a well-known port figure, recalled his role investigating the loss of the SS Poet more than two decades ago. He had spent 15 years as senior marine investigator for the NTSB before retiring in 1996. During his tenure with the NTSB, he investigated 25 major maritime accidents, including the Poet and the loss of the Pride of Baltimore.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 31, 2014
A worn and fractured rail along train tracks through Ellicott City caused the coal train derailment that killed two women in 2012, the National Transportation Safety Board said Thursday. In its final report on the accident, the NTSB said it found evidence that the section of CSX Transportation rail showed signs of "gradual deterioration of the rail-head surface" from passing trains. The finding makes official preliminary conclusions about a rail break contributing to the accident that were released in a docket of investigatory documents last month.
NEWS
By Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel | January 13, 1992
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. -- "Palm 90" probably wouldn't be remembered as one of the most horrifying air disasters if a handful of heroes had not saved a few survivors from the icy Potomac River.But this was real-life drama, a story of tragedy and triumph, captured on camera in the nation's capital.In turn, "Palm 90," the air traffic control code name for Air Florida's Flight 90, is still a vivid memory 10 years later for many across the country. It crashed Jan. 13, 1982, killing 78, including four on the ground.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | May 26, 2014
Maryland State Police today released more details about Sunday's helicopter crash that left two people with minor injuries at Hart-Miller Island near Essex. The helicopter, a Brantley B-2B, experienced a mechanical problem Sunday afternoon, state police said in a news release. The pilot told police that he tried to troubleshoot the problem but could not identify it, and the helicopter made a "hard landing," rolling onto its left side. The pilot and a passenger were uninjured aside from a few "bumps and scratches," according to Baltimore County police spokesman Cpl. John Wachter.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 19, 1996
MIAMI -- Passengers' terrified shouts of "Fire! Fire! Fire!" echoed from the smoke-filled cabin as flames spread rapidly through a ValuJet airliner over the Florida Everglades in May, transcripts of cockpit recordings revealed yesterday."
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Staff Writer | September 24, 1993
MOBILE, Ala. -- An assistant towboat operator -- licensed for a year -- guided a barge into a railroad bridge and then radioed for help 12 minutes before the span collapsed beneath the Sunset Limited, investigators said yesterday."
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Carl M. Cannon and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Washington Bureau of The Sun Sun staff writer Bruce Reid contributed to this article | September 13, 1994
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton and his family returned to the White House last night while the Secret Service and other investigators tried to unravel the mystery of a 38-year-old Maryland man who apparently stole a small plane from a rural airfield, then flew it to the White House where he crashed and died.The Clintons were staying across Pennsylvania Avenue, in Blair House, when Frank Corder, an Aberdeen native, crashed a 1971 Cessna 150 onto the White House lawn at 1:49 a.m. yesterday.
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