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By New York Times News Service | May 1, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The pilots of a Colombian jetliner that ran out of fuel and crashed last year on Long Island, N.Y., were mainly to blame for the accident because they never declared an emergency when talking to air traffic controllers, the National Transportation Safety Board determined yesterday.Had they done so, the controllers would have expedited the plane's landing and avoided the accident, which killed 73 of the 158 people on board the Boeing 707, including both pilots, the independent federal investigative agency said.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 9, 2005
Ten months ago, government safety officials warned that more than half of the nation's 60,000 pressurized rail tank cars did not meet industry standards, and they raised questions about the safety of the rest of the fleet as well. Their worry, that the steel tanks could rupture too easily in an accident, proved prophetic. On Thursday, a derailment in South Carolina caused a catastrophic release of chlorine: eight people died, 58 were hospitalized and hundreds more sought treatment. Thousands of people within a mile of the accident were driven from their homes.
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NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SUN STAFF | November 2, 1998
Minutes past 7 p.m. on Oct. 13, Alan Pollock, a 12-year National Transportation Safety Board employee, was at home watching television when a news bulletin reported an explosion at Condea Vista's South Baltimore chemical plant.The accident, which sent five workers and three residents to local hospitals, did not involve a plane or a train, but Pollock called his office anyway. He wanted the NTSB to report the incident to an obscure federal agency: the U.S. Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board.
NEWS
By Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar and Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 10, 2004
WASHINGTON - Controllers at Los Angeles International Airport were stunned this summer when an arriving jumbo jet narrowly missed a domestic flight cleared to take off on the same runway, a reconstruction showed yesterday. "That was close!" said an unidentified voice on the tower radio frequency, seconds after an Asiana Airlines Boeing 747, arriving from Korea, roared over a Southwest Airlines Boeing 737 preparing to depart for Albuquerque on Aug. 19, according to tapes released by the National Transportation Safety Board.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | December 12, 2001
WASHINGTON -- The National Transportation Safety Board found yesterday that flaws in personnel screening and safety equipment were behind two light rail accidents last year at Baltimore-Washington International Airport, and the board called for nationwide changes in how transit agencies monitor their employees' medical and drug-related problems. The safety board blamed both crashes on operator error, but said both could have been prevented or might have caused fewer injuries had the Maryland Transit Administration been more vigilant.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | November 25, 1997
BY NOW, you've heard that sabotage did not bring down TWA Flight 800.The FBI's basis for that conclusion included a detailed computer simulation that illuminated as never before what happened that July night in 1996. Now it's time to recall the urgent recommendations for safety changes put forth by the crash investigators almost a year ago, and the slow response by the Federal Aviation Administration.The National Transportation Safety Board developed a theory that an explosive air-fuel mix in the Boeing 747-131's largely empty central wing tank had ignited, though the cause of a precipitating spark is still unknown.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 21, 1991
WASHINGTON -- In their first suggestion that a mechanical flaw might have caused a fatal jetliner crash in Colorado five months ago, accident investigators recommended yesterday inspections of the rudder controls on Boeing 737 and 727 jets.Although the investigators, from the National Transportation Safety Board, said they still had not figured out why the 737 crashed in Colorado, they said they had detected a problem that could cause the rudder to move on its own, making the plane difficult to control.
NEWS
By Jon Hilkevitch and Jon Hilkevitch,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 28, 2004
WASHINGTON - Airline pilots and accident investigators sparred yesterday over a safety proposal to put video recorders in aircraft cockpits, with the two sides deeply at odds over the idea that the camera doesn't lie. The National Transportation Safety Board convened a two-day public hearing looking at technical, privacy and legal issues as well as costs associated with the in-flight cameras, and to press for action by the Federal Aviation Administration....
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | June 30, 1996
During the past three decades, the Federal Aviation Administration has rejected 532 recommendations that the National Transportation Safety Board said were necessary to improve air safety.The recommendations are contained in a 750-page document some NTSB investigators call the "I-told-you-so list" -- because items occasionally come back to haunt the industry in crashes.FAA officials, on the other hand, say the agency has adopted or is reviewing almost 83 percent of the safety board's 3,300 recommendations.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | March 26, 1991
LOS ANGELES -- The Federal Aviation Administration has refused to turn over to investigators the medical records of an air traffic controller who directed two airliners onto the same runway at Los Angeles International Airport moments before one struck the other in a fiery crash.The National Transportation Safety Board had requested the records pertaining to Robin Lee Wascher and other controllers as part of its continuing investigation to determine the cause of the Feb. 1 collision between a USAir Boeing 737 and a Skywest commuter plane that killed 34.But on Feb. 22, James B. Busey, administrator of the FAA, which ZTC employs controllers at civilian facilities throughout the United States, departed from customary policy and declined to release the records.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 10, 2004
For the first time, federal regulators released figures yesterday that show how prone individual models of new cars and light-duty trucks are to roll over in an accident, exposing the occupants to high risk of death or serious injury. Instead of assigning a star rating to each model it tests, as it has done in the past, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration released figures that allow consumers to compare rollover risk model by model. The star system, which is continuing, has been criticized for not providing enough information to distinguish among different vehicles, because nearly all received either three or four stars.
NEWS
By Jon Hilkevitch and Jon Hilkevitch,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 28, 2004
WASHINGTON - Airline pilots and accident investigators sparred yesterday over a safety proposal to put video recorders in aircraft cockpits, with the two sides deeply at odds over the idea that the camera doesn't lie. The National Transportation Safety Board convened a two-day public hearing looking at technical, privacy and legal issues as well as costs associated with the in-flight cameras, and to press for action by the Federal Aviation Administration....
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | March 9, 2004
Federal investigators looking into Saturday's fatal capsizing of a water taxi on Baltimore's Inner Harbor are examining the design of the two-hulled Lady D and may study the safety record of similar pontoon boats nationally. Some other water taxi services - including those in Delaware, Chicago, Boston Harbor, Fort Lauderdale, Fla., and Vancouver, Canada - use larger, conventional-hulled boats, which some captains consider more stable in high winds and choppy waters than smaller boats with raised platforms atop pairs of torpedo-shaped floats.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | March 8, 2004
Investigators are "very interested" in whether the captain of the water taxi that capsized in Baltimore's harbor Saturday told passengers to put on life jackets in the moments after he was warned that winds were quickly becoming too dangerous, authorities said last night. "We haven't interviewed all of the passengers yet, but that is one of the questions were are very interested in: `Were they wearing life jackets? Were jackets ever offered? Did they receive a safety briefing?'" said Lauren Peduzzi, spokeswoman for the National Transportation Safety Board.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | March 6, 2002
A CSX train that derailed, ran into a home and killed a teen-ager in a small Western Maryland town two years ago was traveling down a grade at unsafe speeds, federal safety officials said yesterday. In addition, the engineer, who had recently returned to his job after four years in the freight yard, was not adequately trained in how to run the route, they said. The findings involving the accident Jan. 30, 2000, in Bloomington were released yesterday by the National Transportation Safety Board.
NEWS
By James Quintiere | January 3, 2002
THE JET fuel fires in the World Trade Center towers did not bring down those two buildings. Indeed, the fuel burned up in minutes. Why, then, did the towers and their 44-story neighbor, WTC-7, which was not struck by a plane, collapse? It's a question that bears generally on fire safety, the safety of building occupants and firefighters and the vulnerability of our buildings to terror by fire. I expected the National Response Team of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms would participate in an investigation that I surely thought would follow the Sept.
NEWS
By John B. O'Donnell and John B. O'Donnell,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 13, 1996
WASHINGTON - In the wake of the Silver Spring train crash that killed 11 people, the National Transportation Safety Board said yesterday that Maryland's MARC commuter cars "pose an unacceptable risk to the public" and urged immediate changes to make escape easier in an emergency.The safety agency also asked federal regulators to determine if the same "unsafe conditions" exist on other commuter rail lines across the country and to order corrective action immediately. John A. Agro Jr., who heads the Mass Transit Administration, welcomed the safety board's recommendations, saying they "are really confirmation of actions that we outlined" Feb. 21.At that time, MTA said it would make two of the three modifications recommended yesterday by the board at a cost of $6.5 million on its 110 rail cars.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 16, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Government officials said yesterday evening that the National Transportation Safety Board was considering asking the FBI to take over the case of EgyptAir Flight 990, after a review of the plane's cockpit voice recorder.The officials said they were focusing on a cryptic utterance, possibly a prayer, that they indicated might be the last words of a pilot determined to destroy himself and the airplane.The plane crashed into the Atlantic Ocean near Nantucket, Mass., two weeks ago, killing all 217 people on board.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | December 12, 2001
WASHINGTON -- The National Transportation Safety Board found yesterday that flaws in personnel screening and safety equipment were behind two light rail accidents last year at Baltimore-Washington International Airport, and the board called for nationwide changes in how transit agencies monitor their employees' medical and drug-related problems. The safety board blamed both crashes on operator error, but said both could have been prevented or might have caused fewer injuries had the Maryland Transit Administration been more vigilant.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Tom Pelton and Jonathan Bor and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | July 31, 2001
The Johns Hopkins University is investigating a researcher who tested an experimental anti-cancer drug on patients in India without seeking the permission of an internal review board that considers the safety of human studies, a spokesman said yesterday. The experiment, which was conducted on 26 patients in 1999 and 2000, sought to determine whether a chemical derived from the creosote plant could stop the growth of oral cancer. Ru Chih C. Huang, a Hopkins biology professor, said yesterday that she did not submit her study to a Hopkins review board because it was approved by a similar panel at the Indian cancer center where the trial was performed.
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