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NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | November 9, 2012
Here's a tweet from @AP:  AP PHOTO: Petraeus biographer Broadwell, whom FBI probe finds carried on affair with CIA chief, officials say Whom , of course, should be who ; the pronoun is the subject of the clause in which carried on  is the phrasal verb: "FBI probe finds [that] she carried on an affair with CIA chief," to use the old reliable pronoun-substitution method of working the syntax out.  Sentences like this with interpolated attribution and and understood that  are often the occasion for journalists, and civilians as well, to mistake a subject for an object.
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NEWS
October 6, 2014
Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown's recent commentary on Maryland's 2013 Firearms Safety Act is disingenuous and deceitful ( "Brown: I will enforce gun safety law," Oct. 2). The law does nothing to make Marylander's safer. Maryland has had strict guns laws for the last 30 years, yet we are ranked the eighth most violent state according to U.S. Justice Department statistics. Nor did the law truly ban the sale of military style assault rifles; it banned a few models, but many "sporting rifles" with "assault style" features are still legally available.
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NEWS
March 28, 2012
I had to read Bill Krehbrink's letter twice to figure out that he was in favor of George Zimmerman's actions in Florida ("'Stand your ground' makes Florida residents safer," March 26). He seems very concerned that Mr. Zimmerman not even be tried because he is "innocent until proven guilty. " Does he not understand that Trayvon Martin was considered "guilty until proven innocent"? Florida's laws certainly don't make it safer for young blacks wearing hoodies and carrying Skittles.
NEWS
August 21, 2014
The announcement this week that scientists from Aberdeen Proving Ground have successfully completed the destruction of Syria's most dangerous chemical weapons has left the whole world breathing a little easier. If nothing else it ensures these cruel instruments of mass destruction will never be used against the U.S. or its allies - or against the Syrian people, who have been the main victims of the country's four-year civil war, which already has claimed more than 100,000 lives. Make no mistake: Syrian President Bashar al-Assad didn't turn over his country's chemical weapons to international inspectors last year out of any humanitarian impulse.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert | January 10, 2010
Gov. Martin O'Malley, 1999-2007 "My advice to anyone who does the job of mayor, whether they do that job in Baltimore, Boston or any city in the world, is this: Make your city a cleaner city, a safer city and a city that becomes a better place for kids to grow up. Where businesses know they can invest their dollars and their hard work will be returned. "If you make a city cleaner, safer and a better place for kids, the people of the city start to do the rest of the work themselves.
NEWS
By Jon S. Vernick | March 15, 2000
WHEN A 6-year-old child is able to fire a handgun and shoot his classmate, as happened recently in Michigan, Americans everywhere should be asking themselves not just "why did this happen?" but also "what can we do to reduce the chance that this ever happens again?" In Maryland, at least, there is a ready answer. Hearings are scheduled today in the state Senate on a bill that would require new handguns sold in Maryland after June 1, 2003, to be designed so that unauthorized users, like young children, can't operate them.
FEATURES
By New York Times Syndication | April 20, 1993
Acquired immune deficiency syndrome has permanently changed the way people think about sex. Therefore, regardless of the contraceptive method a person prefers, anyone not in a mutually monogamous relationship should exercise extreme caution -- not only in choosing partners but during sex itself.Latex condoms offer good protection against sexually transmitted diseases. "But condoms reduce -- rather than negate -- the risks," says Dr. Charles Hammond, the head of the department of obstetrics and gynecology at Duke University Medical Center in Durham, N.C."
BUSINESS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | September 17, 2003
It could be the perfect SUV, getting a fuel-efficient 36 miles to the gallon and sporting enough safety devices to cut driving fatalities nationwide by 2,900 a year. There's just one drawback to the Guardian XSE - it can't be found in showrooms anywhere. The concept car design was unveiled yesterday by the Union of Concerned Scientists and the Center for Auto Safety at press conferences in Baltimore, Philadelphia and Los Angeles. Their engineers call the Guardian a blueprint to show auto manufacturers how to produce sport utility vehicles that are less dangerous and friendlier to the environment.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | May 5, 2010
Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler endorsed fellow Democrat Kevin Kamenetz for Baltimore County executive on Wednesday, saying the councilman's support for "innovative crime-fighting technology" had made the county safer. The two attorneys, both former prosecutors, discussed crime prevention and video surveillance of shopping centers at a press conference near Towson Town Center. As a member of the Baltimore County Council, Kamenetz sponsored legislation that requires major shopping centers to install video devices.
NEWS
By Cox News Service | January 10, 1992
WASHINGTON -- America is becoming a safer place to live, according to an alliance of consumer groups.An annual comprehensive report on health and safety showed deaths are down from car wrecks and home accidents, people are smoking fewer cigarettes and drinking less alcohol, more folks are buckling their seat belts, and more Americansare trying to eat healthier foods."
BUSINESS
By Michael Bodley, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2014
Ask.fm, the anonymous question and answer-based social network linked to several teenage suicides, agreed to revamp its safety procedures in a deal brokered between the site and the Maryland Attorney General's Office. The agreement is similar to one recently struck between Ask.fm and the New York Attorney General's Office. Maryland Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler announced the site, owned by Ask.com, will remove repeat abusive posters, monitor user-generated misuse and harassment reports and open new positions for a safety liaison and a law enforcement liaison.
HEALTH
By Danae King, The Baltimore Sun | July 9, 2014
Around 3 billion people worldwide cook in their homes over fires fueled by everything from wood and eucalyptus leaves to dried cow dung and quinoa and every year, the World Health Organization estimates, 4 million people die because of the smoke. The problem is the smoke from many home cooking fires is not properly vented outside. The Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health is working to develop a safer way to cook for more than half of the world's population. The project aims to decrease the amount of harmful smoke residents of rural communities can be exposed to using cookstoves in thatched huts with little ventilation.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2014
When Brian Stewart accused a local fraternity chapter at Morgan State University of discriminating against him for being gay late last year, the university stressed its commitment to diversity and began investigating. The two results, Stewart said this week, were that the Alpha Iota chapter of Kappa Alpha Psi was placed on probation for breaking university discrimination policies, and Stewart became an even bigger target of harassment  on the school's Baltimore campus. "I had figures - hidden by the shadows of a campus residence hall and the night sky -- yell threats to me intentionally calling me a [gay slur]
NEWS
May 19, 2014
Next month, the Baltimore City Council is set to approve a new curfew which will call for youth under 14 to be off the street by 9 p.m. and 14- to 17-year-olds to be indoors by 11 p.m. ( "Council approves tough new curfew for city youths ," May 12). The reality is that there are 5- and 6-year-olds wandering the streets of Baltimore. Some parents have their young adolescent children making errands to corner stores at 2 a.m., which isn't safe. What is a young person under the age of 14 doing outside after 9 p.m. without a parent or guardian?
TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman, The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2014
The Town of Ocean City is taking multiple steps to increase safety on the boardwalk this summer, police officials said. Visitors on Memorial Day will notice increased surveillance cameras placed in strategic locations along the boardwalk. The city has always had a few cameras in position but those were mostly used for tourism purposes, said Lindsay O'Neal, spokeswoman for the Ocean City Police Department. "We will have dozen or so cameras total on the boardwalk - and we will have one of our employees monitoring the cameras," said O'Neal, adding that in the past the cameras were not generally used for policing purposes.
NEWS
May 13, 2014
City Councilman Brandon Scott had the right idea this week when he said the bill he is sponsoring to toughen up the city's curfew law to require children under 14 to be indoors year-round by 9 p.m. is not about arresting kids or cutting crime rates. It's about keeping the city's young people safe, and that can't happen if they are allowed to wander the streets late at night. It's really the parents' responsibility to make sure their children are where they're supposed to be at all times, especially after dark.
NEWS
By SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE | November 22, 1995
While praising the toy industry for making safer products, consumer safety advocates warned yesterday that holiday shoppers should still be on the lookout for toys that can seriously injure children.The federal Child Safety Protection Act of 1994, which took effect this year, imposed tougher labeling requirements for toys and raised the minimum size of small balls that could be sold for preschoolers' toys."Don't assume all toys are safe," warned Tom Fendley of the California Public Interest Research Group.
NEWS
Dr. Martin Wasserman | March 27, 2014
Staffers passing by a room in the U.S. House of Representatives office building earlier this month did double takes. Whom they saw inside were no ordinary Capitol Hill briefing attendees: rats, mice, guinea pigs and rabbits. The presence of these animals in the halls of Congress evidences a paradigm shift that could forever change how we protect public health in America. It's one of many developments this month that signal progress toward a safer future. Congressman James Moran (D-Va.)
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2014
I want to prune branches out of a tree so the wind will blow through it and it won't fall on my house. Is that possible? The answer is actually counterintuitive. One would think fewer branches would offer less wind resistance, but time lapse photography has shown that wind does not have the same effect on a tree as on a solid surface, where the wind pushes fairly evenly over the entire object. With a tree, wind hits different branches at different moments, causing some to bend with the wind while others are springing back.
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