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By Michael Neidhardt, The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2014
On Sept. 25, 2004, Loyola High's Van Brooks suffered a broken neck and was paralyzed when his helmet collided with a knee while making a routine tackle. That day marked the end of his athletic career but led to a new passion: being a community leader. "The only thing I could rely on was my education," Brooks said. "Even with all that athletic ability gone, my education is something that couldn't be taken from me. " Now 26, he strives to emphasize the importance of schooling to children.
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NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2014
Students at Long Reach High School in Columbia are readying their attire for prom night: tuxedos, evening gowns and corsages during the event; sweatshirts, hoodies and flip-flops afterward. Like many county juniors and seniors, Long Reach students will get gussied up for their May 3 formal gala in Baltimore - then dress down and head to a popular prom night after-party. Launched by the PTA Council of Howard County's Project Safe, the After Prom events are staged independently at each of the county's 12 high schools as an alternative to the private post-prom parties where alcohol and drug use could arise.
TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman, The Baltimore Sun | April 16, 2014
Is Ocean City the most dangerous place to live in Maryland? Even more dangerous than Baltimore? The surprising answer is yes, at least according to analysis by Movoto , a California-based real estate brokerage firm known for its data-based research of various trends and market conditions across the nation. The company this week released its list of the safest places to live in Maryland. Movoto said its report looked at places with populations of at least 5,000 and then ranked them based on FBI crime statistics in 2012.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | April 8, 2014
Until recently, when someone who enjoys horseback riding in the Maryland countryside told me about a legislative effort to repeal the state's ban on Sunday hunting, I had no idea that such a prohibition was still in place. It struck me as archaic. No hunting on Sunday seems like a blue law, after all, and many of the blue laws that prohibited us from doing certain things on the Christian day of rest were repealed decades ago. As a result, Sunday has become one of the busiest days of the week.
NEWS
April 4, 2014
It's time that the paper generals at the Pentagon go. They are more concerned about the gays in the military and women in combat than protecting our soldiers on American soil ( "Fort Hood shooting: Iraq vet was being treated for mental health issues," April 3). There are tens of thousands of workers at the Pentagon who have never dodged a bullet and make five times as much money as our soldiers. After the first shootings at Fort Hood, they learned nothing and then we had the same thing happen at the Navy Yard.
FEATURES
April 2, 2014
Q: I've seen amber necklaces for babies that are intended to ease teething pain. Does this remedy work? Is it safe? A: Infants and toddlers are developmentally primed to put objects of curiosity into their mouths, so pediatricians worry about small objects that could enter the respiratory tract and cause breathing difficulties or choking. Vendors of the necklaces claim that Baltic amber contains succinic acid, which when released in response to body temperature, they purport, has analgesic benefits.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | March 14, 2014
Church Creek Elementary School was evacuated briefly Friday morning while firefighters investigated a possible gas leak. Around 8 a.m., the school's chief custodian reported an odor of gas in the boiler room at the school at 4299 Church Creek Road, according to Lindsay Bilodeau, communications specialsit for Harford County Public Schools. Per the school system's normal procedures, the building was immediately evacuated and the fire department, BGE and school system facilities crews were notified to respond to the school, Bilodeau wrote in an email.  It was determined that a pilot light was out in one of the boilers.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, Alison Knezevich and Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2014
A nationwide hunt ended Friday night when Caitlyn Marie Virts, the 11-year-old girl missing since her mother was found killed in their Dundalk home on Thursday, was located in a motel room in Florence, S.C., with her father, Timothy Virts, who was taken into custody, Baltimore County police said. "He is in custody, and she is safe," Cpl. John Wachter, a police spokesman, told The Baltimore Sun. Virts, 38, was under warrant for arrest in connection with the stabbing death of Caitlyn's mother, Bobbie Jo Cortez, 36, who was found bound with duct tape in her bed in her home in the 3100 block of Ardee Way on Thursday morning.
NEWS
March 7, 2014
One is the number that ought to be memorized by everyone caring about traffic safety in Maryland ( "Sixty-five (still) saves lives," March 4). Rural interstates accounted for one of Maryland's 485 traffic deaths in 2011, and one of 505 deaths in 2012. Frenzy about rural interstate speed limits demonstrates either tragic ignorance or heartless political pandering. Simple physics explains why interstates have remarkable safety records. Interstates vastly reduce the common causes of crashes, such as crossover conflicts at intersections, head-on collisions with adjacent, opposing traffic and roadside hazards like trees, telephone poles, sharp curves and sheer drop-offs.
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