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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 28, 2002
NEW YORK - Gazing at the movie screen, the audience watched tensely as the actress Jodie Foster scrambled into the bunker-like room, secured the door and snatched the emergency telephone for help in the new movie, Panic Room, a thriller about a woman under siege in a fortified hiding place in her Manhattan brownstone. The look on her face said it all - no dial tone - and the audience let out a collective gasp. Well, except for Robert Davis, who snorted so loudly that people turned around in their seats to see what was going on. "It's just so ridiculous," said Davis, owner of Red Alert Inc., a security company in Staten Island.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 20, 2013
The letter by Paul Romney ("Guns don't make us safer," Feb. 18), commenting on a previous letter by Carl Russell ("Murder makes the case for firearms in the home," Feb. 14), both concerning the recent murder of a woman by her ex-boyfriend, bracket the firearms debate. But what I want to know is: How did the ex get into the woman's apartment? Was her apartment equipped with a steel door, or a peephole, or a hall video camera, or an alarm system, or a safe room, or a panic button, or a big, mean dog?
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NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | February 14, 2003
Customers packed into Courtland Hearth and Hardware in Bel Air yesterday, buying duct tape and plastic sheeting in bulk. Synagogues beefed up security, mindful of tonight's Sabbath services. And nine students from North County High School in Anne Arundel County were grounded, their trip to London canceled. With Osama bin Laden resurfacing on audiotape and a war with Iraq looming, many Baltimore-area residents have been adjusting their routines in response to the government's "orange" alert for increased - but unspecified - terrorist threats.
NEWS
By JOHN MURPHY and JOHN MURPHY,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | July 14, 2006
HANITA, Israel -- As Hezbollah launched scores of rockets into northern Israel yesterday, killing two people, the phone rang at Yaakov and Orna Kariv's home on Israel's border with Lebanon. On the line was their son in Tel Aviv, asking them to come stay with his family, out of range of Hezbollah. Orna Kariv smiled and politely refused her son's offer. She and her husband preferred to stay where they believed the deep calm that brought them to this kibbutz overlooking the Mediterranean Sea 40 years ago would soon return.
NEWS
February 20, 2013
The letter by Paul Romney ("Guns don't make us safer," Feb. 18), commenting on a previous letter by Carl Russell ("Murder makes the case for firearms in the home," Feb. 14), both concerning the recent murder of a woman by her ex-boyfriend, bracket the firearms debate. But what I want to know is: How did the ex get into the woman's apartment? Was her apartment equipped with a steel door, or a peephole, or a hall video camera, or an alarm system, or a safe room, or a panic button, or a big, mean dog?
BUSINESS
By Christine Demkowych and Christine Demkowych,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 6, 2002
When Robert and Zohara Hieronimus decided to build their home in Baltimore County 10 years ago, they wanted to be sure they would have a place to take care of their family and friends at a moment's notice in the event of a crisis. Zoh Hieronimus, a proclaimed futurist and host of a syndicated radio talk show - Future Talk - on WOLB-AM, said their decision to build an underground shelter was made after she unsuccessfully lobbied the U.S. Department of Defense more than 20 years ago to create a shelter system for the entire nation.
BUSINESS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | February 3, 2002
KANSAS CITY, Mo. - No moat, no battlements, no portcullis defend the house in the new Olathe, Kan., subdivision. But in lots of less-than-obvious ways, the house will be more like a castle than the average new dwelling. Features from a basement "safe room" to high-mounted floodlights are designed to thwart burglars and make the house a modern suburban stronghold. "We want people to say, `Where's the stuff at?'" said homebuilder Dave Allen, who is putting up the house along with business partner Ron Olberding in the Foxfield Village subdivision.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | February 17, 2003
BOSTON - The way things are going, they ought to update the Worst-Case Scenario Survival Handbook. The authors just weren't imaginative enough. They got the concept right. "The principle behind this book is a simple one: You just never know." But what you just never knew in 1999 was the easy stuff: how to fend off a shark, escape from killer bees or deliver a baby in a taxicab. The only time they come close to antiterrorism advice is when the authors said what to do when you're in the line of gunfire.
NEWS
By JOHN MURPHY and JOHN MURPHY,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | July 14, 2006
HANITA, Israel -- As Hezbollah launched scores of rockets into northern Israel yesterday, killing two people, the phone rang at Yaakov and Orna Kariv's home on Israel's border with Lebanon. On the line was their son in Tel Aviv, asking them to come stay with his family, out of range of Hezbollah. Orna Kariv smiled and politely refused her son's offer. She and her husband preferred to stay where they believed the deep calm that brought them to this kibbutz overlooking the Mediterranean Sea 40 years ago would soon return.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Beth Gillin and Beth Gillin,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | May 15, 2003
To the relief of fans around the world, the Blogger of Baghdad has resurfaced. Many had feared for the safety of the popular Web diarist Salam Pax after his blog, or Web log, went dark March 24 - just as his colorful and verbose accounts of life on the edge of war were gaining him notice. As it happens, Pax is not only well but as breezy, acerbic and irreverent as ever, whether reporting on the "surreal" sight of "three tanks parked in front of an ice cream shop" or his hay fever - "The sexual life of palm trees makes me weep."
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | February 17, 2003
BOSTON - The way things are going, they ought to update the Worst-Case Scenario Survival Handbook. The authors just weren't imaginative enough. They got the concept right. "The principle behind this book is a simple one: You just never know." But what you just never knew in 1999 was the easy stuff: how to fend off a shark, escape from killer bees or deliver a baby in a taxicab. The only time they come close to antiterrorism advice is when the authors said what to do when you're in the line of gunfire.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | February 14, 2003
Customers packed into Courtland Hearth and Hardware in Bel Air yesterday, buying duct tape and plastic sheeting in bulk. Synagogues beefed up security, mindful of tonight's Sabbath services. And nine students from North County High School in Anne Arundel County were grounded, their trip to London canceled. With Osama bin Laden resurfacing on audiotape and a war with Iraq looming, many Baltimore-area residents have been adjusting their routines in response to the government's "orange" alert for increased - but unspecified - terrorist threats.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 28, 2002
NEW YORK -- Gazing at the movie screen, the audience watched tensely as the actress Jodie Foster scrambled into the bunker-like room, secured the door and snatched the emergency telephone for help in the new movie, Panic Room, a thriller about a woman under siege in a fortified hiding place in her Manhattan brownstone. The look on her face said it all -- no dial tone -- and the audience let out a collective gasp. Well, except for Robert Davis, who snorted so loudly that people turned around in their seats to see what was going on. "It's just so ridiculous," said Davis, owner of Red Alert Inc., a security company in Staten Island.
BUSINESS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | February 3, 2002
KANSAS CITY, Mo. - No moat, no battlements, no portcullis defend the house in the new Olathe, Kan., subdivision. But in lots of less-than-obvious ways, the house will be more like a castle than the average new dwelling. Features from a basement "safe room" to high-mounted floodlights are designed to thwart burglars and make the house a modern suburban stronghold. "We want people to say, `Where's the stuff at?'" said homebuilder Dave Allen, who is putting up the house along with business partner Ron Olberding in the Foxfield Village subdivision.
BUSINESS
By Christine Demkowych and Christine Demkowych,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 6, 2002
When Robert and Zohara Hieronimus decided to build their home in Baltimore County 10 years ago, they wanted to be sure they would have a place to take care of their family and friends at a moment's notice in the event of a crisis. Zoh Hieronimus, a proclaimed futurist and host of a syndicated radio talk show - Future Talk - on WOLB-AM, said their decision to build an underground shelter was made after she unsuccessfully lobbied the U.S. Department of Defense more than 20 years ago to create a shelter system for the entire nation.
BUSINESS
By Trif Alatzas and Trif Alatzas,SUN STAFF | April 6, 2003
Most people have secret hiding places in their homes - a safe for cash, a locked drawer for documents, a cabinet for guns or liquor. Some are taking it a step further: Building rooms to hide themselves. While a jittery nation worries about crime, war, terrorism and chemical attacks, more Americans than ever are finding refuge in "safe" rooms - steel and concrete havens, some buried beneath floors, others tucked behind bookcases. And the public's hunger for security is producing a small but growing industry of manufacturers of in-house fortresses.
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