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Safe Passage

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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | January 6, 1995
In "Safe Passage," the boys aren't only back in town, they're all under the same roof! The boys are the Singer brothers, six out of seven of 'em, gathered under the eaves of a big comfy suburban house to find out if Singer No. 7 (Percival, by name) is or is not dead on some little corner of a foreign field.The wait, as Marines dig through the rubble of a bombed-out barracks looking for bodies in the far-off Sinai, always feels more like a device than an ordeal. It's artificial and stagy. It generally keeps everyone more housebound than 6 feet of snow, where they snip and paw at each other until all wounds have been rubbed raw and all scabs picked clean -- but cutely.
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NEWS
April 12, 2013
I was shocked to hear the news of Dr. Theodore Houk's injury after he was hit by a car recently as he was jogging to work ("Best wishes to Dr. Houk," March 30). I wish him and his family all the best and a speedy recovery. After serving the past 20 years in the military, I was happy to return to the area where I grew up when my family found a home in West Towson last year. Being an avid competitive runner, one of the first things I noticed was Dr. Houk's figure sprinting up and down Charles Street.
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FEATURES
By Barry Koltnow and Barry Koltnow,Orange County Register | January 9, 1995
The same woman who took a very public bath in her first film, washed her bare chest with lemons in another film and seduced a minor-league baseball team in a third film now would like to make you a nice cup of hot chocolate.Yes, the always sensual Susan Sarandon is becoming a prominent mother figure in Hollywood movies, and it's got her a little worried."Traditionally, playing mothers marks the end of your acting career in Hollywood," the actress said. "It certainly marks the end of roles with any sexuality in them."
NEWS
March 4, 2013
The Port of Baltimore had a very good year in 2012, during which it broke several cargo records and handled more autos and farm and construction machinery than any other U.S. port ("Port of Baltimore led the nation in two cargo categories in 2012, officials say," Feb. 28). I believe it is important to recognize the efforts of some of our key partners who played major roles in helping us achieve those successes. Among those partners are the Baltimore and Philadelphia districts of the Army Corps of Engineers, who keep the channels leading to the port properly dredged and maintained for the safe passage of massive cargo and cruise vessels 24 hours a day all year round.
NEWS
March 4, 2013
The Port of Baltimore had a very good year in 2012, during which it broke several cargo records and handled more autos and farm and construction machinery than any other U.S. port ("Port of Baltimore led the nation in two cargo categories in 2012, officials say," Feb. 28). I believe it is important to recognize the efforts of some of our key partners who played major roles in helping us achieve those successes. Among those partners are the Baltimore and Philadelphia districts of the Army Corps of Engineers, who keep the channels leading to the port properly dredged and maintained for the safe passage of massive cargo and cruise vessels 24 hours a day all year round.
NEWS
April 12, 2013
I was shocked to hear the news of Dr. Theodore Houk's injury after he was hit by a car recently as he was jogging to work ("Best wishes to Dr. Houk," March 30). I wish him and his family all the best and a speedy recovery. After serving the past 20 years in the military, I was happy to return to the area where I grew up when my family found a home in West Towson last year. Being an avid competitive runner, one of the first things I noticed was Dr. Houk's figure sprinting up and down Charles Street.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV | john-john.williams@baltsun.com | February 13, 2010
Baltimore schools CEO Andrés Alonso wants residents to shovel sidewalks in their neighborhoods to provide safe passage for students going to school next week. "It is absolutely necessary for the community to help out in terms of sidewalks throughout the city," Alonso said. "We have 83,000 kids, and they are not all going to be driven to school. You have 10-year-olds walking. Unless the sidewalks are done, we have a problem. It is not a problem that the city and the schools can solve.
NEWS
February 6, 1994
No More Subsidies For DiscriminationIt was a pleasure to learn that Maryland's Court of Appeals had overturned a 1991 decision by Circuit Court Judge James Cawood, and unanimously upheld an Annapolis ordinance prohibiting private clubs such as the Elks from obtaining city liquor licenses if their bylaws are discriminatory. . . .The Elks are of course welcome to continue their exclusive membership practices, which bar women and "others," but no longer will these be unwillingly subsidized by Annapolis taxpayers.
NEWS
By Sonni Efron and Sonni Efron,Los Angeles Times | June 19, 1995
BUDYONNOVSK, Russia -- The top Russian commander in Chechnya ordered a halt to all military activity in the breakaway republic yesterday in a major concession to the Chechen rebels who continued to hold hundreds of hostages inside a barricaded hospital here.Peace talks on Chechnya's future were also set for the Chechen capital of Grozny today. A Chechen delegation arrived in Grozny this morning for the start of peace talks with Russian officials, Itar-Tass news agency said.In return, the renegade Chechen commander, Shamil Basayev, released 200 hostages, mostly pregnant women, mothers and children.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 13, 1999
GAZA CITY, Gaza Strip -- Palestinians got their first chance to apply for travel along the soon-to-open "safe passage" route from Gaza to the West Bank yesterday, and by 1 p.m. more than 1,000 Gazans had elbowed and jostled their way into six local government offices to turn in the required forms.For some, it offered the chance of a lifetime. At the office on Nasser Street where applications were handed out, the crowd of mostly young men in their 20s and early 30s included many who had never seen the other half of what they hope will become a Palestinian state.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV | john-john.williams@baltsun.com | February 13, 2010
Baltimore schools CEO Andrés Alonso wants residents to shovel sidewalks in their neighborhoods to provide safe passage for students going to school next week. "It is absolutely necessary for the community to help out in terms of sidewalks throughout the city," Alonso said. "We have 83,000 kids, and they are not all going to be driven to school. You have 10-year-olds walking. Unless the sidewalks are done, we have a problem. It is not a problem that the city and the schools can solve.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 13, 1999
GAZA CITY, Gaza Strip -- Palestinians got their first chance to apply for travel along the soon-to-open "safe passage" route from Gaza to the West Bank yesterday, and by 1 p.m. more than 1,000 Gazans had elbowed and jostled their way into six local government offices to turn in the required forms.For some, it offered the chance of a lifetime. At the office on Nasser Street where applications were handed out, the crowd of mostly young men in their 20s and early 30s included many who had never seen the other half of what they hope will become a Palestinian state.
NEWS
January 11, 1999
FRANKLIN HIGH School students found belated holiday gifts on Reisterstown Road when they returned to class last week: a new crosswalk and oh-so-fashionable lime-green "pedestrian crossing" signs.They were delivered -- sans sleigh -- by the State Highway Administration, which had been working with parents, school officials and the community to try to make the busy road safer for students to cross in the morning and afternoon.First, a bit of history.Franklin is in the midst of a 600-student addition that has eliminated nearly all student parking at the Reisterstown campus.
NEWS
By Sonni Efron and Sonni Efron,Los Angeles Times | June 19, 1995
BUDYONNOVSK, Russia -- The top Russian commander in Chechnya ordered a halt to all military activity in the breakaway republic yesterday in a major concession to the Chechen rebels who continued to hold hundreds of hostages inside a barricaded hospital here.Peace talks on Chechnya's future were also set for the Chechen capital of Grozny today. A Chechen delegation arrived in Grozny this morning for the start of peace talks with Russian officials, Itar-Tass news agency said.In return, the renegade Chechen commander, Shamil Basayev, released 200 hostages, mostly pregnant women, mothers and children.
FEATURES
By Barry Koltnow and Barry Koltnow,Orange County Register | January 9, 1995
The same woman who took a very public bath in her first film, washed her bare chest with lemons in another film and seduced a minor-league baseball team in a third film now would like to make you a nice cup of hot chocolate.Yes, the always sensual Susan Sarandon is becoming a prominent mother figure in Hollywood movies, and it's got her a little worried."Traditionally, playing mothers marks the end of your acting career in Hollywood," the actress said. "It certainly marks the end of roles with any sexuality in them."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | January 6, 1995
In "Safe Passage," the boys aren't only back in town, they're all under the same roof! The boys are the Singer brothers, six out of seven of 'em, gathered under the eaves of a big comfy suburban house to find out if Singer No. 7 (Percival, by name) is or is not dead on some little corner of a foreign field.The wait, as Marines dig through the rubble of a bombed-out barracks looking for bodies in the far-off Sinai, always feels more like a device than an ordeal. It's artificial and stagy. It generally keeps everyone more housebound than 6 feet of snow, where they snip and paw at each other until all wounds have been rubbed raw and all scabs picked clean -- but cutely.
NEWS
January 11, 1999
FRANKLIN HIGH School students found belated holiday gifts on Reisterstown Road when they returned to class last week: a new crosswalk and oh-so-fashionable lime-green "pedestrian crossing" signs.They were delivered -- sans sleigh -- by the State Highway Administration, which had been working with parents, school officials and the community to try to make the busy road safer for students to cross in the morning and afternoon.First, a bit of history.Franklin is in the midst of a 600-student addition that has eliminated nearly all student parking at the Reisterstown campus.
NEWS
October 18, 1993
Residents of SARAJEVO were urged to stay indoors as occasional blasts shook the city. At least 10 people were killed and 57 wounded in Sarajevo over the weekend, officials said.Rival Bosnian government and Serbian leaders met at Sarajevo airport and agreed to exchange all prisoners, starting Wednesday, Bosnian radio reported. Croatian radio reported that Croatian and Bosnian Croatian leaders remained committed to tomorrow as the start of their prisoner exchange with the Muslim-led Bosnian government.
NEWS
February 6, 1994
No More Subsidies For DiscriminationIt was a pleasure to learn that Maryland's Court of Appeals had overturned a 1991 decision by Circuit Court Judge James Cawood, and unanimously upheld an Annapolis ordinance prohibiting private clubs such as the Elks from obtaining city liquor licenses if their bylaws are discriminatory. . . .The Elks are of course welcome to continue their exclusive membership practices, which bar women and "others," but no longer will these be unwillingly subsidized by Annapolis taxpayers.
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