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NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | September 4, 2003
For the past 10 months, a coalition of city and state agencies has been trying a new approach to one of Baltimore's most stubborn epidemics: violent crime among teen-agers. City and state caseworkers identified 70 Baltimore teen-agers affected by the city's culture of violence and enrolled them in an experimental program, called Operation Safe Kids. The program brings together experts who try to address the multiple problems these teens face - parents in jail; drug addiction; unheated or unsafe homes; failing grades and dangerous classmates; and, often, a lack of attention from any adult other than the neighborhood drug dealer.
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NEWS
Susan Reimer | October 22, 2012
Baltimore Ravens fans are loving the new NFL concussion awareness commercial. In it, a mother watering the plants on her porch tells New England quarterback Tom Brady that her little boy loves playing football, and she asks what the National Football League is doing to make the game safer. Mr. Brady hands off to a game official, who talks about rule changes, and then to a doctor, who says the league and the Players Association have donated $100 million to brain injury research.
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NEWS
February 9, 2005
THE TEENAGERS under Dr. Peter L. Beilenson's care were in danger of becoming another Baltimore statistic, another kid shot or killed in a city with a climbing murder rate. But the city health commissioner didn't lose one of the 132 teenagers enrolled in the Operation Safe Kids initiative last year. And Baltimore's juvenile homicide rate reflects that encouraging news. The purpose of Operation Safe Kids can be summed up in a phrase: intensive intervention in the lives of troubled teens with supervision to match.
NEWS
By PETER HERMANN | April 17, 2009
More than a decade ago, Baltimore police commanders gathered in a Mount Washington conference room for an extraordinary meeting to lobby 50 city and state lawmakers. They were fed up with being the only group in town charged with ending the violence consuming the city - and the only one blamed for it. The cops wanted judicial reform, such as a community court to deal with petty crimes that clogged the felony docket. They wanted swift and competent justice for the criminals they arrested over and over.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,Sun Staff | June 17, 2001
Most people think of summer as a carefree time for children, but the days between May and August are when kids face the greatest risk of injury. According to a recent study by the National SAFE KIDS Campaign, an organization chaired by former U.S. Surgeon General C. Everett Koop, 42 percent of all accidental childhood deaths happen during the summer months. "Summer has always been trauma season for children," says Karen Hardingham, a nurse at University of Maryland Hospital for Children and a local SAFE KIDS coordinator.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 14, 2001
TAKING CARE OF yourself mentally and physically can be a lot of fun. That's the message behind Peace of Mind Day, a family festival organized by local health organizations, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday at Westminster city playground off Longwell Avenue. "We want to provide information and enlightenment in the spirit of fun, entertainment and good will," said Sandy Woodburn, a volunteer on Carroll County Mental Health and Addictions Advisory Committee's public awareness subcommittee.
NEWS
May 9, 2005
IT'S HARD TO ARGUE with the latest plan to tinker with Maryland's lumbering juvenile justice system. After all, we've seen much of it before: Calls for smaller facilities, more mental and physical health care before and during incarceration, and more and better training for staff at the Department of Juvenile Services have come from advocates, legislators, this newspaper and DJS itself. Some specifics, though, are worth attention - and action. The 10-point plan offered by Baltimore Mayor Martin O'Malley reflects lessons learned during the city's running of such services as Operation Safe Kids, an intensive, cooperative intervention program for juveniles in greatest danger of being shot or shooting someone.
TRAVEL
July 8, 2001
Tickets for "The Producers," the hottest show in New York, are about as easy to come by as a snowstorm in July. The Broadway hit, starring Nathan Lane and Matthew Broderick, has garnered 12 Tonys, terrific reviews and amazing ticket sales. Most performances are sold out well into 2002. But in New York, money talks, so there are ways to see the show. The Marriott Marquis Hotel in Times Square is offering a two-night package deal that gets you not only mezzanine seats (which won't be available again until mid-March 2002)
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | January 2, 2006
Last week, a 15-year- old boy was gunned down on an East Baltimore street corner where a community volunteer I know frequently goes to pick up children for recreational activities. "What a waste of a young life," this dedicated volunteer wrote in an e-mail Thursday. "Or, to look on the bright side, the kid probably didn't have any education, probably couldn't hold a job if someone got him one, and he was on his way to being addicted. He didn't have much of a future to look forward to anyhow."
NEWS
By PETER HERMANN | April 17, 2009
More than a decade ago, Baltimore police commanders gathered in a Mount Washington conference room for an extraordinary meeting to lobby 50 city and state lawmakers. They were fed up with being the only group in town charged with ending the violence consuming the city - and the only one blamed for it. The cops wanted judicial reform, such as a community court to deal with petty crimes that clogged the felony docket. They wanted swift and competent justice for the criminals they arrested over and over.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Reporter | July 14, 2007
The camp in Harford County offers some of the elements of traditional summer programs - games, obstacle courses, crafts. But the 100 children in the camp at a fire station near Havre de Grace also focus on less-familiar activities: how to make a 911 call; how to stop, drop and roll in case of a fire; how to handle an encounter with a wild animal. "Most summer camps are about sports, but this one is about saving lives," said Steve Hinch, chief of the Aberdeen Volunteer Fire Company and one of more than 40 volunteers at the three-day camp called Play It Safe.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | January 2, 2006
Last week, a 15-year- old boy was gunned down on an East Baltimore street corner where a community volunteer I know frequently goes to pick up children for recreational activities. "What a waste of a young life," this dedicated volunteer wrote in an e-mail Thursday. "Or, to look on the bright side, the kid probably didn't have any education, probably couldn't hold a job if someone got him one, and he was on his way to being addicted. He didn't have much of a future to look forward to anyhow."
NEWS
May 9, 2005
IT'S HARD TO ARGUE with the latest plan to tinker with Maryland's lumbering juvenile justice system. After all, we've seen much of it before: Calls for smaller facilities, more mental and physical health care before and during incarceration, and more and better training for staff at the Department of Juvenile Services have come from advocates, legislators, this newspaper and DJS itself. Some specifics, though, are worth attention - and action. The 10-point plan offered by Baltimore Mayor Martin O'Malley reflects lessons learned during the city's running of such services as Operation Safe Kids, an intensive, cooperative intervention program for juveniles in greatest danger of being shot or shooting someone.
NEWS
February 9, 2005
THE TEENAGERS under Dr. Peter L. Beilenson's care were in danger of becoming another Baltimore statistic, another kid shot or killed in a city with a climbing murder rate. But the city health commissioner didn't lose one of the 132 teenagers enrolled in the Operation Safe Kids initiative last year. And Baltimore's juvenile homicide rate reflects that encouraging news. The purpose of Operation Safe Kids can be summed up in a phrase: intensive intervention in the lives of troubled teens with supervision to match.
NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | September 4, 2003
For the past 10 months, a coalition of city and state agencies has been trying a new approach to one of Baltimore's most stubborn epidemics: violent crime among teen-agers. City and state caseworkers identified 70 Baltimore teen-agers affected by the city's culture of violence and enrolled them in an experimental program, called Operation Safe Kids. The program brings together experts who try to address the multiple problems these teens face - parents in jail; drug addiction; unheated or unsafe homes; failing grades and dangerous classmates; and, often, a lack of attention from any adult other than the neighborhood drug dealer.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | September 6, 2002
City and state officials are pledging to do a better job of monitoring young, violent offenders under a new program that Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend and Mayor Martin O'Malley will announce today. Under Operation Safe Kids, city police and state probation agents will form joint patrols to make sure juvenile offenders are obeying court-ordered curfews and other conditions of their release. An apprehension unit will track down those who violate those conditions. The city's Health Department will hire workers to help offenders find jobs, receive drug treatment and gain access to other social services.
NEWS
May 16, 1995
The annual Safe Kids Day, sponsored by Carroll County General Hospital, will take place from noon to 3 p.m. Sunday.The first 500 families will receive a grab bag of gifts, including a first aid kit, a flying disc and informative hospital brochures.The focus is on safety with a "jaws of life" demonstration by area rescue squads.Ambulances and fire engines will be on display, and state police will use the crash simulator to show why wearing seat belts is important. Clowns will be there and face-painting offered for children.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | September 6, 2002
City and state officials are pledging to do a better job of monitoring young, violent offenders under a new program that Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend and Mayor Martin O'Malley will announce today. Under Operation Safe Kids, city police and state probation agents will form joint patrols to make sure juvenile offenders are obeying court-ordered curfews and other conditions of their release. An apprehension unit will track down those who violate those conditions. The city's Health Department will hire workers to help offenders find jobs, receive drug treatment and gain access to other social services.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | October 3, 2001
Pint-sized pupils trooping to school at Talbott Springs Elementary yesterday morning rubbed elbows along the way with the likes of Howard County Executive James N. Robey, Police Chief Wayne Livesay and Fire Chief Joseph Herr . The police, fire and county government officials were there to underline the importance of encouraging children to be careful when walking to and from school each day. Nationally, pedestrian injuries are the third-leading cause...
TRAVEL
July 8, 2001
Tickets for "The Producers," the hottest show in New York, are about as easy to come by as a snowstorm in July. The Broadway hit, starring Nathan Lane and Matthew Broderick, has garnered 12 Tonys, terrific reviews and amazing ticket sales. Most performances are sold out well into 2002. But in New York, money talks, so there are ways to see the show. The Marriott Marquis Hotel in Times Square is offering a two-night package deal that gets you not only mezzanine seats (which won't be available again until mid-March 2002)
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