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Safe House

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NEWS
By Donna Abel and Donna Abel,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 30, 1999
EVERY YEAR thousands of children are killed or injured in and around the home. In most cases, these accidents could have been avoided if the child had been given basic lessons in household safety.Mount Airy Volunteer Fire Company is dedicated to teaching children the importance of fire and home safety.The company is looking for donations to purchase Safe House, a small, realistic house designed to teach children safety lessons that could mean the difference between life and death.Safe House is a vinyl, portable house that can be taken to schools, day-care facilities, carnivals or used at the fire station.
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ENTERTAINMENT
Emily Kline and For The Baltimore Sun | December 16, 2013
After tonight's finale, it's hard to imagine what another season of "Homeland" would look like. Season three's finale wraps it all up and writes the fates for all our key characters. Let's start at the beginning. Brody is standing over General Akbari's dead body at the headquarters of the Iranian Revolutionary Guard. He drags the body under the desk, pockets a gun he finds in a desk drawer and walks out of the building as calmly as possible. We know it's only a matter of seconds, though, before someone realizes the general has been assassinated The news that something is wrong churns through the building just as Brody shuts the door of the sleek black SUV waiting for him outside.
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NEWS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,SUN STAFF | March 24, 2004
Carroll County has secured property for its first safe house for victims of domestic violence. A local organization will lease to the county g a 3,100-square- foot house for a $1 per year for three years beginning in May, said Joan McKee, deputy director of Human Services Programs of Carroll County. The location of the safe house was not revealed for security reasons. Yesterday, the county commissioners granted preliminary approval for Human Services Programs and Family and Children's Services of Carroll County to submit a grant application to the state Department of Human Resources.
ENTERTAINMENT
Lauren McEwen and For The Baltimore Sun | December 6, 2013
When I checked the episode guide and saw that last night's episode was titled “YOLO,” I knew that things were going to get insane. And they did, quickly. Huck's in full-on torture mode. He's got a naked Quinn on the floor, tied up with duct tape, and is narrating the ways that he plans to hurt her. Because they are friends, he'll yank out her teeth with pliers instead of taking off toes or fingers. Thanks? At one point, he licks the side of her face and apologizes because he is going to enjoy hurting her; it is one of the creepiest TV moments I have ever witnessed.
NEWS
By Katie Martin and Mary Gail Hare and Katie Martin and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | February 27, 2005
Any doubt about the need for a domestic violence shelter in Carroll County evaporates in the face of a filled-to-capacity new shelter and a long row of T-shirts, decorated with poignant words and pictures by victims of the escalating problem. The county, the last jurisdiction in the state to open a safe house, celebrated the shelter at the offices of Carroll's Human Services Programs in Westminster on Thursday. The staff showed a video of victims and gave grateful speeches to volunteers who helped renovate the home.
NEWS
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,SUN STAFF | February 26, 1996
For months, Darlene's husband hit her and threatened to kill their 4-year-old daughter when she tried to leave. Finally, the battered Southern Maryland mother and child escaped -- embarking on a journey that led them to a Baltimore County "safe house.""We're Towson's best-kept secret," said Grace Fendlay, executive director of Active Coalition for Transitional Services Inc. (ACTS), a nonprofit organization that operates three homes for survivors of domestic violence.Clients and their children can stay for up to two years at the shelters, which offer counseling and support for the victims.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | December 31, 2004
After years of work by volunteers and professionals, a safe house in Carroll County will open for the new year to shelter women and children from domestic violence. Sheriff's deputies and other volunteers have been painting and spackling, hanging curtains and finishing electrical work on the house in the final weeks leading up to the opening, said Joan S. McKee, deputy director of the nonprofit Human Services Programs of Carroll County Inc. "We plan to open Jan. 3," said McKee, who has been working to get the house ready.
NEWS
By JULIAN E. BARNES, SOLOMON MOORE AND GREG MILLER and JULIAN E. BARNES, SOLOMON MOORE AND GREG MILLER,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 10, 2006
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- The United States has conducted at least 56 raids against targets connected with Abu Musab al-Zarqawi's al-Qaida in Iraq organization in the first 48 hours since his death, seeking to capitalize on his killing by disrupting his network of fighters, military officials said. After bombing a dwelling where al-Zarqawi and five others were killed Wednesday, U.S. forces conducted 17 raids across Baghdad and struck 39 additional sites yesterday, said Maj. Gen. William B. Caldwell IV, the U.S. military spokesman in Baghdad.
NEWS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,SUN STAFF | June 18, 2004
After two years of discussion and planning, Carroll County's first safe house for victims of domestic violence could open as early as November. County officials, Human Services Programs of Carroll County and the Carroll office of Family and Children's Services of Central Maryland received preliminary approval on an agreement with the state to establish a comprehensive domestic violence program, including opening a shelter for abuse victims. "It is, in many ways, a significant event, and it's been very worthwhile working on this for two years," said Stephen Mood, executive director of Human Services Programs.
NEWS
By JOSH MEYER and JOSH MEYER,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 21, 2005
WASHINGTON -- In confirming the existence of a top-secret domestic spying program, President Bush offered one case as proof that authorities desperately needed the special surveillance tool to plug a gaping hole in the counterterrorism firewall that allowed terrorists to carry out the Sept. 11 attacks. In his radio address Saturday, Bush said two of the hijackers who flew a jet into the Pentagon, Nawaf al-Hazmi and Khalid al-Midhar, had communicated with suspected al-Qaida members overseas while they were in the United States.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | October 16, 2013
On the 11th anniversary of the fatal firebombing of a family in East Baltimore, a candidate for the Baltimore State's Attorney's Office announced he wanted to expand on the success of a safe house built on the charred ruin of the home. Russell A. Neverdon Sr., a defense attorney hoping to unseat Gregg L. Bernstein, said Wednesday that creating new safe houses modeled upon the Dawson Family Safe Haven center fits his approach of pairing prosecution with "holistic" approaches to criminal justice.
EXPLORE
October 29, 2011
SYKESVILLE — The Sykesville Police Department will host its first "Safe House" gun turn-in program in November, where residents can bring any unwanted firearms and ammunition to a drop-off point at the Sykesville Police Department, 7547 Main St., Sykesville. The "drop-off" site will be opened on Saturday, Nov. 19, between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. The site will be manned, but no questions will be asked of persons dropping items off. If requested it, a receipt can be provided. Police say residents should not bring loaded weapons to the station.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2011
Maia Woods had long wondered about the strange-looking house on Rolling Road in Rockdale, the one that sits off Liberty Road, boarded up and neglected. On Saturday, she found out about its years as a station on the Underground Railroad, how it's been moved twice in its 200-plus-year history by family members well aware of its historical importance, and how it was bought by a couple 30 years ago determined to see it preserved — even though it's been so contaminated by pesticides that no one will ever be able to live in it again.
FEATURES
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest, Special to The Baltimore Sun | January 8, 2011
A student's request for a holiday charitable donation is what first sparked yoga instructor Tina Lanzoni's interest in the nonprofit group called Giving Back, Linda's Legacy. The nonprofit operates the Holiday Homeless Drive in Baltimore, Anne Arundel County and Washington by collecting basic necessities and delivering them to the homeless and to shelters on Christmas Eve. This past holiday season, the group collected 1,600 donated backpacks filled with hooded sweatshirts, thermal underwear, wool socks, a hat and gloves.
NEWS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,Sun Reporter | June 3, 2007
The Carroll County office of Family and Children's Services of Central Maryland has officially teamed up with all the county's law enforcement agencies - the state police, the municipal departments and the sheriff's office - to match crisis workers with police officers to respond to domestic violence incidents through the First Step program. The expanded partnership will help Family and Children's Services bring its programs to more victims and publicize the county's more than two-year-old protective shelter, said Connie Sgarlata, director of the non-profit agency's Westminster office.
NEWS
May 6, 2007
Reduced YWCA funding will hurt We were devastated to see that County Executive John R. Leopold's proposed budget includes a $60,000 reduction in FY08 funding for the YWCA. This will inevitably have a severe and immediate impact on our ability to help women and their families in crisis. This county money directly funds Arden House, which is the only safe house in the county for women fleeing from domestic violence. Lack of service for these vulnerable women and children means an increased likelihood of injury and death.
EXPLORE
October 29, 2011
SYKESVILLE — The Sykesville Police Department will host its first "Safe House" gun turn-in program in November, where residents can bring any unwanted firearms and ammunition to a drop-off point at the Sykesville Police Department, 7547 Main St., Sykesville. The "drop-off" site will be opened on Saturday, Nov. 19, between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. The site will be manned, but no questions will be asked of persons dropping items off. If requested it, a receipt can be provided. Police say residents should not bring loaded weapons to the station.
NEWS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,Sun Reporter | June 3, 2007
The Carroll County office of Family and Children's Services of Central Maryland has officially teamed up with all the county's law enforcement agencies - the state police, the municipal departments and the sheriff's office - to match crisis workers with police officers to respond to domestic violence incidents through the First Step program. The expanded partnership will help Family and Children's Services bring its programs to more victims and publicize the county's more than two-year-old protective shelter, said Connie Sgarlata, director of the non-profit agency's Westminster office.
NEWS
By JULIAN E. BARNES, SOLOMON MOORE AND GREG MILLER and JULIAN E. BARNES, SOLOMON MOORE AND GREG MILLER,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 10, 2006
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- The United States has conducted at least 56 raids against targets connected with Abu Musab al-Zarqawi's al-Qaida in Iraq organization in the first 48 hours since his death, seeking to capitalize on his killing by disrupting his network of fighters, military officials said. After bombing a dwelling where al-Zarqawi and five others were killed Wednesday, U.S. forces conducted 17 raids across Baghdad and struck 39 additional sites yesterday, said Maj. Gen. William B. Caldwell IV, the U.S. military spokesman in Baghdad.
NEWS
By GINA DAVIS and GINA DAVIS,SUN REPORTER | April 30, 2006
J.T. Bright was a willing, if jittery, recruit when a Maryland State Police officer surveyed a crowd of students for a volunteer to help him demonstrate the swift skills of Yuka, the department's patrol dog. "At first, I couldn't believe they were going to let us do that," said Bright, an 11th-grader at South Carroll High School in Winfield who also attends classes at the Carroll County Career and Technology Center in Westminster. "I was a little nervous. ... Especially when the dog charged at me."
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