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NEWS
By Clara Germani and Clara Germani,Sun Staff Correspondent | July 26, 1994
PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti -- Meet Jean-Renal Cabral: 38-year-old pick-and-hoe subsistence farmer, soft-spoken but proud father of six and No. 1 U.S. foreign policy problem.His dream -- multiplied by thousands like it -- is a U.S. government nightmare: "I was headed for Florida because I knew it would be a better life and I could have a job and make it possible to bring the rest of my family."Mr. Cabral, traveling with his 2-year-old son Robinson, was one of several hundred boat people repatriated to Haiti last week via a Caribbean odyssey of rickety boats, U.S. Coast Guard cutters and long days of waiting at the crowded U.S. naval base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.
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NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and The Baltimore Sun | March 7, 2012
Sens. Benjamin L. Cardin and Barbara A. Mikulski urged President Barack Obama on Wednesday to speed the withdrawal of U.S. combat troops from Afghanistan. The Maryland Democrats joined a group of 24 senators in declaring the mission in Afghanistan largely accomplished. “It is time to bring our troops home from Afghanistan,” the group, which included 21 Democrats, two Republicans and an independent, wrote in a letter to Obama. “The United States intervened in Afghanistan to destroy al Qaeda's safe haven, remove the Taliban government that sheltered al Qaeda, and pursue those who planned the September 11th attacks on the United States.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau of The Sun | November 26, 1994
WASHINGTON -- A Navy task force with 2,000 Marines aboard is being sent toward the Adriatic coast in case they are needed to evacuate peacekeepers from Muslim-held Bihac, the United Nations "safe haven" under assault by Serbian forces, the Pentagon said last night.Maj. Tom LaRock said the goal of the force is to support United Nations, NATO and U.S. military personnel in the area.The move was announced as the Bosnian Serbs detained more than 200 U.N. peacekeeping troops as hostages to ward off allied air attacks.
NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,SUN STAFF | August 15, 2000
The Westminster Common Council approved last night giving the county $60,000 to help finance the construction of Safe Haven's proposed homeless shelter in Westminster. The gift was in response to last week's determination by county commissioners that county taxpayers would have to pay for $123,302 in extra costs for the $877,250 project, and ordered county staff to pare costs and seek in-kind donations. The actual shortfall is $148,000, which includes the cost of constructing a parking lot, according to Jolene Sullivan, director for the department for citizen services for Carroll County.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | February 28, 2001
Carroll County commissioners expect Maryland officials to act soon on a request for a $465,400 state grant to relocate the Safe Haven homeless shelter in Westminster. "We're hoping to hear something by the end of March, but that's not set in stone," Jolene Sullivan, Carroll's director of citizen services, told the commissioners yesterday. State funding would come from the Maryland Department of Housing and Community Development. Larry Moore, head of construction for that department, visited the proposed site last week.
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | May 7, 2012
My book club, which focuses on works with a Jewish theme, is reading "The Free World" by David Bezmozgis. It was one of the better novels we've read, though it conntinued a common theme of a rootless people looking for a safe haven. In 1978, when a trickle of Jews were allowed to leave the Soviet Union, three generations of the Krasnansky family land in Italy, a way station to their new home. Each member of the family carries a particularly poignant bit of personal baggage, which weighs on their decision to seek a new life in the United States, Israel or Canada.  You'll like this if: You enjoy a well-written character study, rather loosely plotted.
NEWS
July 10, 2013
Dan Rodricks is right on with his article about doing better for at-risk kids than foster care ("Getting to Baltimore's at-risk kids," June 30). However, the only surefire remedy for abused and neglected kids is to prevent their being born to 11-13- and 15-year-old mothers. Children cannot thrive in households where they are raised by generations of children bearing children with no fathers around. The statistics about the risks children born to children inevitably face are mind-boggling.
NEWS
December 20, 2012
Where does one start about guns and the love for an outdated Second Amendment that our forefathers if they lived today would never have written? Where does one begin about the armament industry, corporations without conscience for all they are killing in the name of profit? And what happened to the fingerprint activation device they once promised as a gun lock to save the lives of our children? What happened to our TV, theater, the games our children play, and who decided America needed a steady diet of murderous violence?
NEWS
By JEAN MARBELLA | December 19, 2006
With the ceremonial ribbon just cut and its rooms mostly empty but for the scent of new paint, the Dawson Family Safe Haven Center hasn't yet become whatever it is destined to become. And yet, on its corner of Preston and Eden in East Baltimore, one thing is clear. This is hallowed ground. This is, as Mayor Martin O'Malley repeated several times yesterday, "a holy place." In a neighborhood with numerous boarded-up rowhouses and a police camera blinking a harsh blue eye, 1401 E. Preston St. is not an obvious Gettysburg, or a Ground Zero.
NEWS
By Courtney Watson | January 3, 2013
Many of us can remember what it feels like to be bullied as a kid in school or in the neighborhood. Perhaps you were the focus of a joke or a kick in the shin, or maybe it was the simple act of exclusion from the lunch table or the dodge ball team. Sometimes no harm was meant; other times the inflicted pain was intentional, and you remember it years later. One thing was certain, however, and that was the ability to escape the bullying in the safe haven of home. No schoolyard antagonist could penetrate the walls of home, and thus that sanctity served as an oasis where a bullied child could regroup and feel safe for a portion of each day while learning to navigate the world.
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