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NEWS
By Clara Germani and Clara Germani,Sun Staff Correspondent | July 26, 1994
PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti -- Meet Jean-Renal Cabral: 38-year-old pick-and-hoe subsistence farmer, soft-spoken but proud father of six and No. 1 U.S. foreign policy problem.His dream -- multiplied by thousands like it -- is a U.S. government nightmare: "I was headed for Florida because I knew it would be a better life and I could have a job and make it possible to bring the rest of my family."Mr. Cabral, traveling with his 2-year-old son Robinson, was one of several hundred boat people repatriated to Haiti last week via a Caribbean odyssey of rickety boats, U.S. Coast Guard cutters and long days of waiting at the crowded U.S. naval base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.
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NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,SUN STAFF | August 15, 2000
The Westminster Common Council approved last night giving the county $60,000 to help finance the construction of Safe Haven's proposed homeless shelter in Westminster. The gift was in response to last week's determination by county commissioners that county taxpayers would have to pay for $123,302 in extra costs for the $877,250 project, and ordered county staff to pare costs and seek in-kind donations. The actual shortfall is $148,000, which includes the cost of constructing a parking lot, according to Jolene Sullivan, director for the department for citizen services for Carroll County.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | February 28, 2001
Carroll County commissioners expect Maryland officials to act soon on a request for a $465,400 state grant to relocate the Safe Haven homeless shelter in Westminster. "We're hoping to hear something by the end of March, but that's not set in stone," Jolene Sullivan, Carroll's director of citizen services, told the commissioners yesterday. State funding would come from the Maryland Department of Housing and Community Development. Larry Moore, head of construction for that department, visited the proposed site last week.
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | May 7, 2012
My book club, which focuses on works with a Jewish theme, is reading "The Free World" by David Bezmozgis. It was one of the better novels we've read, though it conntinued a common theme of a rootless people looking for a safe haven. In 1978, when a trickle of Jews were allowed to leave the Soviet Union, three generations of the Krasnansky family land in Italy, a way station to their new home. Each member of the family carries a particularly poignant bit of personal baggage, which weighs on their decision to seek a new life in the United States, Israel or Canada.  You'll like this if: You enjoy a well-written character study, rather loosely plotted.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | July 16, 2003
DOUGLAS F. Gansler, the Montgomery County state's attorney, just wanted to do a good thing. Anybody out there against doing a good thing? Of course you're not. In Gansler's case, he just wanted to save the lives of newborn babies. It started with a case he prosecuted three years ago. Tanisha Montague was an 18-year-old Jamaican who had entered the country illegally. She gave birth to a baby girl in her Germantown townhouse an hour before midnight Jan. 25, 2000. While a snowstorm raged outside, Montague lay in bed with her baby.
NEWS
December 20, 2012
Where does one start about guns and the love for an outdated Second Amendment that our forefathers if they lived today would never have written? Where does one begin about the armament industry, corporations without conscience for all they are killing in the name of profit? And what happened to the fingerprint activation device they once promised as a gun lock to save the lives of our children? What happened to our TV, theater, the games our children play, and who decided America needed a steady diet of murderous violence?
NEWS
By Josh Meyer and Josh Meyer,Los Angeles Times | September 8, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Appearing in a videotaped message for the first time in nearly three years, Osama bin Laden tells the American people to reject their capitalist way of life and embrace Islam or his followers will "escalate the killing and fighting against you." "This is our duty, and our brothers are carrying it out, and I ask Allah to grant them resolve and victory," the al-Qaida leader said in the video, which aired yesterday on the Internet and TV. The tape was apparently made by al-Qaida's media arm, As-Sahab, to be released for the sixth anniversary of the Sept.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | April 7, 2013
During the session with editors of the Associated Press Stylebook at the American Copy Editors Society's national conference in St. Louis last week, someone brought up the issue of safe haven . It was a voice from the back of the room and I didn't quite gather the import, but someone later asked whether the term shouldn't be avoided because it is redundant. Indeed. It is an obnoxious pleonasm, a haven being by definition a safe place. But the stylebook editors on the panel, David Minthorn and Darrell Christian, declined to condemn it, because, they said, it has become a stock phrase.
NEWS
By A. M. Rosenthal | March 16, 1993
DESPITE the deaths in the World Trade Center bombing and the blood of the wounded, neither the American press, public nor government has yet focused on the basic nature of terrorism in and from the Middle East.The full story of how the bombing was inspired, organized and paid for may not be told in court for years, if ever. We still do not know the truth about the 1988 bombing of Pan Am 103.But we do not need the courts, just the record of recent history, to understand that Mideastern terrorism is not born in some storage locker in New Jersey or the furies of a few traveling fanatics.
NEWS
By John Fritze and John Fritze,Sun reporter | December 19, 2006
Four years ago, the burned-out rowhouse - barely standing, with its beams destroyed and its walls charred - was a constant reminder of one of Baltimore's most brutal crimes and a symbol of how the drug trade terrorizes city neighborhoods. City and state leaders who were gathered on the corner of Eden and Preston streets said yesterday that they hope the renovated Dawson home - soon to have new life as a community center and "safe haven" for children - will symbolize new hope for the Oliver neighborhood.
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