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NEWS
By Quinise Green | May 21, 2012
I am a Baltimore police officer in what is often termed the "hood" in the Eastern District. It is an impoverished, predominantly African-American neighborhood where children often don't have enough to eat or live in apartments where the lights have been turned off. Some are homeless. In communities like ours, tension and distrust often characterize the relationship between law enforcement and residents. It is an unfortunate reality that can contribute to higher crime, unaccountable officers and witnesses afraid to come forward.
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NEWS
July 10, 2013
Dan Rodricks is right on with his article about doing better for at-risk kids than foster care ("Getting to Baltimore's at-risk kids," June 30). However, the only surefire remedy for abused and neglected kids is to prevent their being born to 11-13- and 15-year-old mothers. Children cannot thrive in households where they are raised by generations of children bearing children with no fathers around. The statistics about the risks children born to children inevitably face are mind-boggling.
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NEWS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | March 3, 1999
With a few months to go before their funding dries up, officials from the Safe Haven shelter went before the county commissioners yesterday in search of more money.Jolene G. Sullivan, director of the Department of Citizen Services, told commissioners that the shelter, which has a budget of nearly $500,000, will need at least $167,000 from the county to stay open in fiscal 2000, which will begin July 1.The shelter's three-year grant from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development will end March 31, and the state has given the county permission to transfer $25,000 in state funds from the county mental health director's budget to the shelter to keep it running until the end of June.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | April 7, 2013
During the session with editors of the Associated Press Stylebook at the American Copy Editors Society's national conference in St. Louis last week, someone brought up the issue of safe haven . It was a voice from the back of the room and I didn't quite gather the import, but someone later asked whether the term shouldn't be avoided because it is redundant. Indeed. It is an obnoxious pleonasm, a haven being by definition a safe place. But the stylebook editors on the panel, David Minthorn and Darrell Christian, declined to condemn it, because, they said, it has become a stock phrase.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | July 25, 2003
An eight-year struggle ended yesterday when Carroll officials cut a red ribbon to signal the official opening of Safe Haven, a multipurpose homeless shelter in Westminster. The $1.2 million facility, which opened to residents about a month ago, houses three programs - a long-term home for mentally ill men and women, a temporary home for men, and a cold-weather shelter that will be open between November and April. Carroll officials said they are not sure how large the county's homeless population is. The old Safe Haven served 373 people last year, and all but two of the 33 beds in the new building are occupied.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | July 25, 2003
An eight-year struggle ended yesterday, when Carroll officials cut a red ribbon to signal the official opening of Safe Haven, a multipurpose homeless shelter in Westminster. The $1.2 million facility, which opened to residents about a month ago, houses three programs, a long-term home for mentally ill men and women, a temporary home for men and a cold-weather shelter that will be open between November and April. Carroll officials said they are not sure how large the county's homeless population is. The old Safe Haven served 373 people last year, and all but two of the 33 available beds in the new building are occupied.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | January 13, 1999
Carroll has secured adequate funding to keep the county's Safe Haven homeless program operating until July, county officials said yesterday.The state has given the county permission to transfer $25,000 in state funds from the county mental health director's budget to the homeless program, whose three-year grant from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development ends March 31.Those funds will cover the operating costs of the shelter from April 1...
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | October 4, 1998
The Safe Haven homeless program won't be homeless until well into 2001 -- even though Carroll County officials have decided to give back the federal money to build a new shelter.Carroll County General Hospital, which bought the current Safe Haven site from the county in 1995, will lease the building back for $1 a year for the next three years, said Deanna Dell, hospital chief operating officer.After more than a year of feuding between County Commissioners and Westminster city officials over a location, the state asked for the return of a $125,000 federal grant to build a new shelter, said Robert E. Mulderig, director of the Maryland Department of Human Resources' Office of Transitional Services.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | January 10, 2005
State officials have awarded almost $230,000 to Knox Community Development Corp. for the creation of the Dawson Safe Haven for Children, Youth and Families. The Dawson Safe Haven will be a community center that provides safe activities for children and families, state officials said. The check - presented in a ceremony Friday at Knox Presbyterian Church with Lt. Gov. Michael S. Steele and State Housing and Community Development Secretary Victor L. Hoskins - comes from Maryland's Community Legacy program.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | July 6, 1999
Although the county commissioners rescued Safe Haven from its financial woes in May, shelter officials are still in need of donations to cover the cost of round-the-clock security.Safe Haven, which is in the Shoemaker House near Carroll County General Hospital in Westminster, has 25 beds and serves homeless people with mental illness, substance abuse and addiction problems.Human Services Programs of Carroll County Inc., a nonprofit corporation that operates Safe Haven and several homeless programs under contract with the county, has recommended the shelter have 24-hour security.
NEWS
By Courtney Watson | January 3, 2013
Many of us can remember what it feels like to be bullied as a kid in school or in the neighborhood. Perhaps you were the focus of a joke or a kick in the shin, or maybe it was the simple act of exclusion from the lunch table or the dodge ball team. Sometimes no harm was meant; other times the inflicted pain was intentional, and you remember it years later. One thing was certain, however, and that was the ability to escape the bullying in the safe haven of home. No schoolyard antagonist could penetrate the walls of home, and thus that sanctity served as an oasis where a bullied child could regroup and feel safe for a portion of each day while learning to navigate the world.
NEWS
December 20, 2012
Where does one start about guns and the love for an outdated Second Amendment that our forefathers if they lived today would never have written? Where does one begin about the armament industry, corporations without conscience for all they are killing in the name of profit? And what happened to the fingerprint activation device they once promised as a gun lock to save the lives of our children? What happened to our TV, theater, the games our children play, and who decided America needed a steady diet of murderous violence?
NEWS
By Quinise Green | May 21, 2012
I am a Baltimore police officer in what is often termed the "hood" in the Eastern District. It is an impoverished, predominantly African-American neighborhood where children often don't have enough to eat or live in apartments where the lights have been turned off. Some are homeless. In communities like ours, tension and distrust often characterize the relationship between law enforcement and residents. It is an unfortunate reality that can contribute to higher crime, unaccountable officers and witnesses afraid to come forward.
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | May 7, 2012
My book club, which focuses on works with a Jewish theme, is reading "The Free World" by David Bezmozgis. It was one of the better novels we've read, though it conntinued a common theme of a rootless people looking for a safe haven. In 1978, when a trickle of Jews were allowed to leave the Soviet Union, three generations of the Krasnansky family land in Italy, a way station to their new home. Each member of the family carries a particularly poignant bit of personal baggage, which weighs on their decision to seek a new life in the United States, Israel or Canada.  You'll like this if: You enjoy a well-written character study, rather loosely plotted.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and The Baltimore Sun | March 7, 2012
Sens. Benjamin L. Cardin and Barbara A. Mikulski urged President Barack Obama on Wednesday to speed the withdrawal of U.S. combat troops from Afghanistan. The Maryland Democrats joined a group of 24 senators in declaring the mission in Afghanistan largely accomplished. “It is time to bring our troops home from Afghanistan,” the group, which included 21 Democrats, two Republicans and an independent, wrote in a letter to Obama. “The United States intervened in Afghanistan to destroy al Qaeda's safe haven, remove the Taliban government that sheltered al Qaeda, and pursue those who planned the September 11th attacks on the United States.
NEWS
January 19, 2012
Kudos to City Council President Jack Young for admitting that there are "so many other important programs and services which lack much needed support in the city" than the Baltimore Grand Prix ("Young urges mayor to end Grand Prix," Jan. 12). The city can start with the recreation centers that supply a safe haven for learning and recreational activities for our vulnerable youth. Youngsters need these outlets and exposure to better things than hanging out on the corners. The centers are supported by their communities, their schools, churches and local families.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | March 7, 2002
After waiting nearly a year, the Carroll commissioners learned yesterday that state officials have given the county a $608,872 grant to build Safe Haven homeless shelter. The county had been awaiting word on the grant since April. Officials with the Maryland Department of Housing and Community Development refused to release the grant money until a copy of the winning bid was forwarded to the state Board of Public Works. "The money the state gave us will allow us to move forward with the new homeless shelter," said county budget director Steven D. Powell.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | August 29, 1998
NEW YORK -- Gold fell to a 19-year low yesterday on concern zTC that Russia may sell gold from its reserves, dumping even more on the market at a time when the metal has lost its appeal as a safe haven in turbulent economic times.No longer is gold the asset investors hoard when other assets tumble. In the middle of global financial turmoil kicked off by Russia this week, the precious metal is down almost 4 percent since Monday. Gold for December delivery fell $2.20 to $277.90 an ounce in New York yesterday, the lowest since June 1979.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2011
An Anne Arundel County councilman plans to introduce legislation as early as Monday night that would require anyone seeking county government services to produce a state identification card or a driver's license, a move that he says would help stem illegal immigration. Councilman John J. Grasso, who campaigned for his council seat last year on a platform to tackle illegal immigration in the county, said the legislation would prevent the county from becoming a "safe haven. " The measure would affect services such as checking out library books.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo | November 22, 2008
Nebraska was among the last states to pass a law letting parents abandon their children without the threat of criminal prosecution. And once the state did, children began appearing at local hospitals. But they weren't infants. And they weren't toddlers. Most of the 35 children left by their parents were 11 or older. It was an astonishing outcome of a well-meaning law and a disturbing sign of families in distress. From reports of the fallout of Nebraska's safe haven law, which took effect in September, many of the abandoned children had special needs.
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