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NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith | April 30, 2000
IN THE winter of 1965, before the anti-war movement began in earnest, I wrote about a family in South Attleboro, Mass., whose son had been killed in Vietnam. He was one of the first casualties from that part of the state -- a new thing then, a Page One story. A Marine officer stood at attention next to the family Christmas tree, offering the nation's condolences. A stoic sadness -- a solicitude for the young officer with the difficult duty -- filled the room. The young man's parents must have asked themselves why, but they did not challenge the authority that sent their boy to his death.
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FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | December 13, 2002
Mike Leigh's All or Nothing is an exhilarating movie about sadness and renewal, set in a London housing project. It's an unlikely follow-up to Leigh's brilliant Gilbert and Sullivan extravaganza, Topsy Turvy. But in its own way All or Nothing is piercingly musical, too, from the first shot of a girl pushing a mop through the hall of an old-age home while an elderly woman advances toward her slowly, with a cane, resisting help. In lesser hands the material would be dreary. Mike Leigh, both a superb filmmaker and a humanist, grasps the rhythmic beauty of the scene and turns it into a poem on the duty of the young character and the determination of the older one. Leigh has a way of depicting force of habit that accentuates the positive even when what's happening is negative.
EXPLORE
September 8, 2011
O, say can you see relief (pitchers) in the future of professional baseball in Maryland? The losing team's fan's simultaneous lament and cry of hope that there's always next season has grown a little more poignant as the years have gone by. The Baltimore Orioles have been in a slump that will soon be measurable in decades rather than years. The bright star of Cal Ripken Jr. and his exemplary work ethic kept fans interested locally even as the Orioles organization closed up shop before the start of the postseason year after year.
NEWS
May 1, 2011
Thursday, April 27, was an extremely sad day for the United States of America. That a sitting president should feel the need to release his birth certificate in order to quell nasty rumors about his eligibility to hold office was shocking, but then to hear even that did not wholly satisfy the doubters, some of whom are now questioning his college records, is almost unbelievable. I cannot help but think this is a result of prejudice. Because he is biracial? Has an unusual name? I had been hopeful that we Americans had progressed beyond that.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Sun Staff Writer | July 14, 1994
They had gathered at a West Baltimore rowhouse wearing black tuxedos and fancy dresses, preparing to mourn a 79-year-old family leader who died Sunday and was to be buried this morning.Instead, they pulled up to the Edgewood Street house to find firefighters digging through debris, pulling out a stack of charred Bibles that were part of a family collection, and ambulances whisking the deceased man's widow and daughter to the hospital.The wife, Georgia Hamlin, 77, and daughter, Joyce Black, 59, were dressing for the funeral when an air conditioner on the second floor overheated and ignited, fire officials said.
NEWS
By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,Sun Staff Writer | September 11, 1994
If only for a few hours, the turmoil of a country hundreds of miles away did not dominate Walter Rolton. Amid the strains of reggae and calypso music at the 13th annual Caribbean Festival, he almost forgot the unrest in Haiti.But concern for his homeland and the strife among his fellow Haitians is never far from his mind."Yes, I do think of there much, very much," Mr. Rolton said yesterday as he sat against a tree at Druid Hill Park and watched thousands of festival-goers. "Sometimes you think about it too -- much and you do nothing else.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder | January 18, 1991
JACKSONVILLE, Fla. -- When three Navy officers in dress uniform knocked on the door of Michael Scott Speicher's Jacksonville home at 4:30 yesterday afternoon, his wife, Joanne, knew why they were there -- to tell her that her husband had been shot down in the Persian Gulf."
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | March 23, 1992
Despite the recession, The Prime Rib restaurant (average dinner check $50-plus) was packed on Friday night for two sittings, with revelers also jammed three-deep around the piano and the bar. Eight blocks southwest, because of the recession, Our Daily Bread soup kitchen, 411 Cathedral St., was similarly packed Saturday and yesterday at noon, quietly feeding 650 hungry men, women and (sadly) little children. Because the soup kitchen, open 365 days a year, desperately needs money and staple food items, please phone director Steve Tuttle, 659-4000, for specific needs, delivery details, etc. (I take or send a $100.
NEWS
By William Safire | June 4, 1993
BILL Clinton has made two major forays into foreign affairs so far. His first was a winner: The embrace of Boris Yeltsin at the Vancouver summit probably helped democratic reformers increase the size of their victory in the Russian referendum.His second was a loser: He announced his intention to coerce the Bosnian Serbs to the peace table with air power, then dispatched his secretary of state to Europe to bring the allies along; instead, Warren Christopher brought back the first public humiliation of an American president since World War II.What caused this loss of leadership?
NEWS
By MARK FRANEK | October 6, 2005
I teach at a high school where the kids are bright, well-informed and politically astute. But most of them think that a newspaper is something you use to clean up after a dog or put beneath an open can of paint. They get most of their news from the Internet or from cable shows such as John Stewart's The Daily Show. This is not altogether a bad thing. For example, this fall I will write college recommendations for about 10 seniors. One of them is an avid reader of the newspaper, but she rarely reads the printed version.
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