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By Ken Tucker and Ken Tucker,Special to the sun | May 31, 1998
"The Treatment," by Daniel Menaker. Knopf. 266 pages. $23.Daniel Menaker understands that the best comedy can contain great sadness -- portray it, embrace it, transcend it. His exceedingly funny and moving "The Treatment" commences like vintage Saul Bellow by way of the young Philip Roth.Our hero is Jake Singer, an English teacher for a posh New York City prep school and deep in the thrall of five-days-a-weektherapy sessions with his analyst, the exquisitely eccentric Dr. Morales -- "the short, bald, muscular, black-bearded Catholic Hispanic tyrant-genius of East Ninety-third Street."
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NEWS
By Gregory Rodriguez | June 19, 2014
America - arguably the world's most diverse, innovative, and surprising nation - is becoming a lot more predictable. And boring. According to the most recent Pew Research Poll on political polarization, Americans are becoming more consistently liberal or conservative in their opinions, and ideological thinking is much more aligned with political party membership than before. This means that the overlap between the two parties that existed two decades ago - when there were conservative Democrats and liberal Republicans - is gone.
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NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | December 15, 2005
I don't like to write about the lingering, simmering sadness. But it's part of life. It's the reality of an American city that keeps trying to recover from decades of profound and festering problems. I had hoped I would never hear from Lula Key again - not because she isn't a pleasant woman, but because she always reminds me that, as good as it gets here these days, it's been bad for too many for too long - an epoch of drug addiction and related violence that left thousands of mothers weeping.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2014
Other than that sweet swing and the 3,141 hits, the thing that stood out the most about Tony Gwynn was the 1000-watt smile that shined on everyone he met and seemed to be right for every occasion. If Gwynn, who died from cancer Monday at age 54, appeared to be the world's nicest human whenever he showed up on ESPN's SportsCenter or at some local charity event, then there really is truth in advertising because he was the real deal both on the field and off it. Of course, he was one of the greatest all-time hitters and, if you needed a testimonial to that, you could have asked Ted Williams before he died in 2002. He was a big fan of Gwynn's, as was Cal Ripken Jr., whose heartfelt statement Monday simply confirmed what anybody who ever met Gwynn already knew.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance Sun Staff Writer Sun staff writers John Fairhall and Frank Langfitt contributed to this article | May 26, 1995
News that The Evening Sun will publish for the last time Sept. 15 was met yesterday with sadness and tributes, but little surprise."It's a sad day when your paper dies, even when expected," said Ernie Imhoff, who served for several weeks in 1992 as The Evening Sun's last managing editor after a long career on that paper."
NEWS
April 9, 2005
Text of the homily read, in Italian, by Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger, dean of the College of Cardinals, during the funeral Mass of Pope John Paul II. Translation provided by the Vatican: Follow me." The Risen Lord says these words to Peter. They are his last words to this disciple, chosen to shepherd his flock. "Follow me" - this lapidary saying of Christ can be taken as the key to understanding the message which comes to us from the life of our late beloved Pope John Paul II. Today we bury his remains in the earth as a seed of immortality - our hearts are full of sadness, yet at the same time of joyful hope and profound gratitude.
NEWS
By Abigail Tucker and Abigail Tucker,SUN REPORTER | April 18, 2007
So many people logged onto VTTragedy.com yesterday that Vy Le couldn't keep up with the traffic, and the site crashed. The visitors were not just the classmates that the Virginia Tech sophomore thought would want to access the memorial site in the aftermath of the campus shooting Monday that left 33 people dead. There were people from England, Vietnam and all around the world. "Everyone wants to share their feelings with Virginia," Le said. Which is why Le's not giving up on the site, which has consumed almost all of her time since police let her back into her dorm.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Michael Dresser and Ivan Penn and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | December 15, 1998
As news of a nine-count indictment against former state Sen. Larry Young flashed across television screens yesterday at Mondawmin Mall, several shoppers and workers shook their heads in disappointment."
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Michele Nevard and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Michele Nevard,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 7, 1997
LONDON -- The woman the world knew simply as "Di" made her final wrenching journey on the streets of London yesterday followed by her family and people whose lives she had touched, and watched by millions whose love she had captured.It was a journey back through her own brief years, along the broad avenues of this venerable capital, from her home at Kensington Palace, past the royal bastion of Buckingham Palace to the narrow country lanes leading to the English country estate where she was born into the aristocracy.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | April 21, 2004
As he lay dying of stab wounds early Saturday, 20-year-old Johns Hopkins University student Christopher Elser told a fraternity brother, "I tried, I fought." "His death was as a hero," Brian Kinsella told more than a thousand mourners who gathered yesterday on Hopkins' Homewood campus to remember Elser, a junior from Camden, S.C. "He didn't give up. He was one of the toughest kids I knew," said Kinsella, a sophomore member of Elser's Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity. Elser was stabbed by an intruder at the fraternity's off-campus Charles Village apartment house just before 6 a.m., two hours after a party ended with a door left unlocked.
NEWS
May 28, 2014
I've just read, with sadness, all the names of those who died in the wars of Iraq and Afghanistan from Maryland ("In memoriam," May 26). Very sad. I could not help from thinking the whole time, why were they there in the first place? Did they know why they were there? Randall Miller, Ocean View, Del. - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
NEWS
By J.B. Salganik | October 15, 2013
While it saddened me to read recently of the attendance troubles at the Reginald F. Lewis Museum, I was not surprised. In a city where museums generally exceed expectations, the Reginald F. Lewis Museum has always left something to be desired. As a high school history teacher in Baltimore City public schools, I have never wanted to take my students there because I know intuitively they would hate it. While I understand the impulse to showcase African Americans' social and economic high achievers, this positivist approach obscures the scope of what black Americans have overcome in the past and the challenges they still face today.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2013
I will leave it to The Sun's political reporters to write about who "won" or "lost" this cooked-up and dumbed-down TV cartoon of a debate between Gov. Martin O'Malley and his Texas counterpart Rick Perry Wednesday on CNN's "Crossfire. " I am only here to say how sad I am to see Maryland's Democratic governor and our political discourse bent to fit the phony dictates of cable TV this way. When comedian Jon Stewart famously denounced the "Crossfire" format in 2004, he called the two hosts that night, Tucker Carlson and Paul Begala, "partisan hacks.
FEATURES
By Kim Fernandez,
For The Baltimore Sun
| August 28, 2013
The old adage is that the happiest time of the year for moms and dads is the day the yellow bus takes their darlings off for their first day of school. It's not altogether true in my house (which felt too quiet by mid-morning yesterday), though I'll admit not missing my kids' bickering very much. For her part, the Labrigator watched her little humans scamper off to school the last two mornings and retired upstairs for long naps, seemingly undisturbed by their absence. But for many pets, back to school is a sad time, and they're lost without their school-age companions -- especially if all the adults are also gone all day. The experts at Pets360 say their recent survey found that 20 percent of pet owners with school-age children said their pets showed signs of anxiety or depression when everyone in the house went back to their normal routine at the end of the summer.
NEWS
August 8, 2013
Presidential wannabe Martin O'Malley faces a huge obstacle ( "O'Malley outlines possible 2016 bid," Aug. 5). According to "The Geography of Happiness," a comprehensive University of Vermont research study published by PLOS (Public Library of Science) on May 29, Governor O'Malley's administration has caused Maryland to be the 48th least happy state in the nation. Only Louisiana and Mississippi rank lower. It appears that Sad Sack will not have a shot at the Democratic nomination for president unless his principal opponents hail from those two states in the Old South.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, Yvonne Wenger and Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2013
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake, making her most extensive comments on the wave of violence that has shaken the city, said Wednesday that she was "sad about the state of our community" and pleaded with residents to help detectives solve cases. Rawlings-Blake struck an uncharacteristically frank tone at a City Hall news conference, while police said they were making progress on arrests and pledged to communicate better with the public. Five people were shot Tuesday night, one fatally, and two more shootings were reported Wednesday — one in the morning, when a gunshot victim walked into Union Memorial hospital, and one in the evening, when a man was shot in the arm in the Poppleton neighborhood.
FEATURES
By STEPHANIE SHAPIRO and STEPHANIE SHAPIRO,SUN STAFF | April 27, 1999
Sarah, Duchess of York, was on the road again, and feeling vaguely gloomy. She sent her driver into a deli to buy her two cheese and tomato sandwiches slathered with salty butter and two "full-bodied" Coca Colas, none of that diet stuff. The driver, aware of the Duchess' role as a Weight Watchers spokeswoman, asked if she was sure. She insisted.But before chowing down, she called her Weight Watchers adviser on the cell phone and, sounding like someone hoping to be talked off a ledge, told her she was about to gobble it up."
NEWS
April 17, 2013
The Sun has indeed reached new lows by blaming the Kermit Gosnell matter on the anti-abortion lobby ("Kermit Gosnell and the 'liberal media,'" April 16). No wonder newspapers are dying. The most shocking thing about The Sun's view is that it is not shocking at all. Sadly, this is what we've come to expect from editorial boards today. Bernard P. Codd
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