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NEWS
By Elise Armacost | December 3, 1995
CHILDREN OCCUPY a strangely dichotomized position in American society, at once exalted and beaten into submission.Rhetorically, children are the most sacred of sacred cows. Nearly every policy decision at every level of government is defended or attacked with some variation of this statement: "We owe it to the children." The environment must be saved "for the children." The budget must be balanced "for the children."Tragedies are more tragic when they happen to kids. The fact that a day care center took the brunt of the Oklahoma City bombing elevated that event to a higher level of atrocity.
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NEWS
By Leonard Pitts | January 22, 2012
You might call this a requiem for reverence. It seems that one Jeffrey Darnell Paul, a graphic artist from Miami Beach, had been tasked with creating a poster for a strip club's so-called "I Have a Dream Bash" last week in apparent "honor" of the Martin Luther King Jr. holiday. So this genius concocts an image of the nation's greatest human rights leader holding up a fan of $100 dollar bills like some low-rent "playa" while a scantily clad woman looks on. Mr. Paul, let the record show as African-Americans duck their heads in mortification, is black.
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FEATURES
By Nancy Imperiale and Nancy Imperiale,Orlando Sentinel | November 22, 1992
What kind of maniac picks on milk?That's what critics muttered after Dr. Benjamin Spock appeared at a press conference in September questioning the notion that milk does a body good.It should have come as no surprise. Dr. Spock has made a career out of tipping sacred cows. This is the same man who regularly marches against the military, aided draft dodgers in the '60s and told generations of strict parents to stop spanking their kids.The author of the best-selling "Dr. Spock's Baby and Child Care" has never followed the crowd as much as his conscience.
NEWS
By Don Lee, Tribune Newspapers | December 19, 2010
WASHINGTON — Fifteen years ago, Carol Nietmann and her husband bought a spacious house in Calvert County near the Chesapeake Bay. And thanks to the time-honored tax deduction for mortgage interest, she says, their new place was a little bigger and a little nicer than they otherwise would have been able to afford. Perhaps the most sacred of all the sacred cows in the tax code, the home mortgage deduction has long been seen as critical to a major element in the American dream — owning your own home.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,Evening Sun Staff | October 22, 1991
In the midst of the state's fiscal crisis, legislators have discovered an interesting document -- the state budget.For the past three weeks, the legislature has been looking at the big picture -- getting rid of a $450 million deficit and making multimillion- dollar decisions on which programs to pay for.State senators have now narrowed their focus, looking at the little things that puff up the cost of state government and send talk show critics into a...
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | November 9, 1993
TOKYO -- In its first effort to reduce the government's power over Japan's minutely regulated economy, a commission appointed by Prime Minister Morihiro Hosokawa yesterday called for the elimination or easing of 475 regulations governing the nation's legal and economic systems.The proposals, which were in an interim report hastily prepared tTC so that Mr. Hosokawa can present it to President Clinton this month at a planned meeting in Seattle, were ambitious but conspicuous in their lack of details.
NEWS
May 15, 2007
Gov. Martin O'Malley's recent decision to order his Cabinet secretaries to cut their budgets by a collective $200 million is a welcome, if slightly overdue, event. After all, wasn't the O'Malley administration defending its entire $30 billion budget to the General Assembly just last month? But better late than never. The state is headed toward a budget deficit of $1.4 billion to $1.5 billion in fiscal 2009, and the sooner spending is reduced, where appropriate, the better. But let's keep some perspective.
NEWS
By Anthony J. Lomenzo | July 19, 1991
BOTH of them gaze down at me from their 8-by-10 frames on my workroom wall. I'll often look up at the two faces when writing social commentary and exclaim, "Well, what do you think?" They never answer, of course, but there are times during the wee hours when I swear I can see lip movement.Especially from the one on the left with the ever-present Uncle Willie in his mouth, the ironically cherubic face, hair meticulously parted in the middle and the requisite tie. I see it in those eyes of Anthony J.Lomenzohis: "The thing should stir the animals and cause the ecclesiastics to pray for you."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Vicchio and Stephen Vicchio,Special to the Sun | March 24, 2002
Since the development of a hybrid German / English University model in the United States in the latter part of the 19th century, the debate over the question of tenure has largely been a story of accusation and invective. If the combatants are to be believed, it has been a tale of boogey men and sacred cows, or shall I say, boogey men or sacred cows. On the one side of the issue, the affirmative side, professors argue, with all the fervor of the prophet Jeremiah, that the very existence of academic freedom and the ability to attract and retain new faculty are at stake in any contemplation of significantly revising or eliminating academic tenure.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts | January 22, 2012
You might call this a requiem for reverence. It seems that one Jeffrey Darnell Paul, a graphic artist from Miami Beach, had been tasked with creating a poster for a strip club's so-called "I Have a Dream Bash" last week in apparent "honor" of the Martin Luther King Jr. holiday. So this genius concocts an image of the nation's greatest human rights leader holding up a fan of $100 dollar bills like some low-rent "playa" while a scantily clad woman looks on. Mr. Paul, let the record show as African-Americans duck their heads in mortification, is black.
NEWS
By Ron Smith | December 2, 2010
In this week of WikiLeaks, "Slurpee Summits" and lame ducks quacking in the halls of Congress, an underlying and most disturbing reality remains intact and in charge, leading some of us to question whether the recently conducted midterm elections really matter much at all. One must understand that any number of newly minted elected officials, presidents, senators and congressional representatives have promised to change Washington upon taking office....
NEWS
October 25, 2009
Both Mayor Sheila Dixon and Gov. Martin O'Malley made a stir last week for acknowledging the inevitable: Despite their efforts to avoid it, the depth of the budget crisis facing the city and the state will force cuts to the most sacred of public priorities: firefighters, police and teachers. Ms. Dixon is in the midst of negotiations with the police and fire unions to trim their budgets for the current fiscal year by $8 million, part of her effort to make $60 million in cuts citywide. And Mr. O'Malley told superintendents at a meeting this week to start scouring their budgets for savings, noting that "virtually every other aspect of state government has been cut."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | October 15, 2009
Go see Doug Stanhope at the Ottobar on Friday night, and chances are you'll be angered, outraged, maybe even ticked off beyond all sense of reason. With luck, you'll laugh, too. He is, after all, the comic whose profile in a 2006 issue of British GQ was headlined, "Is This America's Most Depraved Man?" As a comic, he's following in the footsteps of such angry young men as Lenny Bruce, Richard Pryor, Bill Hicks and Lewis Black, ignoring conventions of good taste, cracking jokes about things both hallowed and profane, never meeting a sacred cow he didn't want to gore.
NEWS
By THOMAS F. SCHALLER | February 24, 2009
Of the many causes of our economic crisis, few were as damaging as the securitization of home mortgages. But there's another culprit - a tax benefit so popular with Americans that politicians question it at their peril. First, let's examine the securitization issue. Large investors believed that the American housing market was a solid, low-risk way to invest billions of dollars. Corporate stocks might return more, but with greater risk; bonds might be less risky, but with less return. They thought mortgage-backed securities offered the ideal mix of strong returns with low risk.
NEWS
By John Rennie Short | September 4, 2007
As we pick through the debris caused by the subprime lending fiasco, it is pertinent to ask how we got into this mess. Dodgy lending practices, unreliable risk assessment, sheer greed and other dubious financial practices all played their part. But at the heart of the matter is the shibboleth that homeownership is the only housing policy worth pursuing. Federal policies now make the alternatives to homeownership very unattractive. Public housing has disappeared for all but the very poor, and private renters get no tax breaks.
NEWS
May 15, 2007
Gov. Martin O'Malley's recent decision to order his Cabinet secretaries to cut their budgets by a collective $200 million is a welcome, if slightly overdue, event. After all, wasn't the O'Malley administration defending its entire $30 billion budget to the General Assembly just last month? But better late than never. The state is headed toward a budget deficit of $1.4 billion to $1.5 billion in fiscal 2009, and the sooner spending is reduced, where appropriate, the better. But let's keep some perspective.
NEWS
July 1, 1992
Light RailThe letter from Nancy E. Tillman (June 13) requires comment. She complains about the light-rail system being partly single-track and wants to know why more money wasn't spent to double-track the entire line. And I could add to that other money-saving items such as the planned bridge at Timonium Road which, for lack of funds, is an at-grade crossing.The reason for what some critics may refer to as a "bargain-built" system falls on the state legislators from the "other" parts of the state.
NEWS
By JAMES J. KILPATRICK | August 20, 1991
Washington. -- Mike Synar's little amendment, as the Oklahoma Democrat sees it, is intended only to recover for the taxpayers a realistic fee for the use of public grazing land. This same amendment, in the view of Republican James Hansen of Utah, would destroy the Western cattle business, ruin the environment and kill a great little industry.Since this session of Congress began in January, we have heard some fine fat arguments over gun control, election reform, foreign aid and heaven knows what, but for a knockdown, drag-out, bar-the-doors slugfest, in which facts are thrown through the windows as bystanders cheer, nothing is likely to surpass the fight over grazing fees.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Vicchio and Stephen Vicchio,Special to the Sun | March 24, 2002
Since the development of a hybrid German / English University model in the United States in the latter part of the 19th century, the debate over the question of tenure has largely been a story of accusation and invective. If the combatants are to be believed, it has been a tale of boogey men and sacred cows, or shall I say, boogey men or sacred cows. On the one side of the issue, the affirmative side, professors argue, with all the fervor of the prophet Jeremiah, that the very existence of academic freedom and the ability to attract and retain new faculty are at stake in any contemplation of significantly revising or eliminating academic tenure.
NEWS
By Erika D. Peterman and Erika D. Peterman,SUN STAFF | February 24, 1999
Howard County school board members approved yesterday an operating budget for next year that is an 11 percent increase over this year's budget, and would require $9 million more from the county than the superintendent requested.The proposed budget, $302.8 million, seeks across-the-board employee raises, including an extra $7.1 million for instructional salaries. However, schools spokeswoman Patti Caplan said that agreements with the various unions were still tentative as of Tuesday.Perhaps foreshadowing a struggle with the County Council over funding, board members stressed that the budget is subject to change in May. That's when the county -- which funds about 75 percent of the budget -- decides how much money it will give the school system.
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