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NEWS
By RICHARD LOUV | January 8, 1993
San Diego -- Every family needs sacred time. Steven Baym believes that religious Jews and Christians should bring back the Sabbath and that all people, religious or not, can create a kind of personal Sabbath -- a family Sabbath.By that, he means a day focused entirely on the family and the spirit, when work is stopped, the TV turned off and the heart turned inward.Mr. Bayme is director of the Jewish Communal Affairs Department of the American Jewish Committee in New York, and director of the Institute on the Jewish Family.
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BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2014
An eruv is a ritual zone typically marked by wire or string that makes certain activities otherwise forbidden on the Sabbath possible for Orthodox Jews. There are numerous restrictions on activities on the Sabbath, which runs from sundown Friday to sundown Saturday, related to a prohibition on working on what's supposed to be a day of rest. For example, carrying keys, money or even babies - even pushing children in a stroller - is prohibited. But an eruv expands the private walls of the home, relaxing those restrictions.
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NEWS
By Donna Rifkind and Donna Rifkind,Special to The Sun | August 20, 1995
"Sabbath's Theater," by Philip Roth. Boston: Houghton Mifflin. 451 pages. $24.95 After 21 books, Philip Roth has finally written a real novel.That may seem an outrageous statement about a near-legendary American author showered with accolades, including, in the last decade alone, two National Book Critics Circle Awards and the PEN/Faulkner prize. Nonetheless, I think it's a fair claim. Let me explain.While justly celebrated for their humor, anger, shock value and energy, Mr. Roth's novels have seemed a series of literary exercises rather than literature itself, their mechanics as visible as underwear through a sheer skirt.
NEWS
October 29, 2012
I appreciated Dan Rodricks ' insightful and compassionate column on the arguments against marriage equality being made by some church leaders, based on parts of the Bible that condemn homosexuality as "an abomination worthy of death" ("Same-sex unions: What would Jesus do?" Oct. 25). As a student of the Old Testament, I examined the Book of Leviticus, from which that phrase is drawn, as well as other parts of the Bible. Sure enough, a man lying with another man commits a mortal sin. But lo and behold: In the Book of Exodus, working on the Sabbath is also a mortal sin. Elsewhere in Leviticus, a man who eats shellfish or pork, or cuts his hair and beard, also commits acts worthy of death.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 16, 1999
BERLIN -- It's been nearly a decade since the starved consumers of East Germany burst through the Berlin Wall, but it took until yesterday to topple another formidable barrier to capitalism: a federal ban on retail shopping in Germany on the day designated for "spiritual reflection."Hundreds of stores opened their doors for the first time on the Lord's Day to a veritable storm of shoppers in this capital city, in Leipzig and in Halle, ringing up record sales and transforming the usual Sabbath somnolence into a festival of frenzied spending.
NEWS
By ROBERT A. ERLANDSON and ROBERT A. ERLANDSON,SUN STAFF | January 16, 1998
The hot line telephone started ringing just after noon yesterday as concerned Orthodox Jews checked that the Baltimore County eruv is intact so they can enjoy a relaxed Sabbath.Shmuel Siegel, 18, who spent more than two hours checking the boundaries, assured callers that all was well.Since last spring, the eruv, a symbolic enclosure, has bounded a large area of northwestern Baltimore County. Created to help attract more Orthodox Jews to the county, the eruv establishes a "private domain" in which Sabbath restrictions against "work" from sundown Friday until sundown Saturday are relaxed -- very slightly.
NEWS
By Frank P. L. Somerville | October 20, 1995
"The 124,000 Maryland children living in poverty" are the focus of prayers, sermons and discussions in churches, mosques and synagogues across the state today through Sunday, the "Children's Sabbath" weekend proclaimed by Gov. Parris N. Glendening.Participating congregations in Maryland will join an estimated 60,000 congregations of many faiths in other parts of the country whose worship services, religious education classes and community outreach projects are aimed at "improving the lives of America's poor children," a spokesman for the Children's Defense Fund in Washington said.
NEWS
September 11, 2005
The second annual convention of the Sabbath-school association convened Sept. 8, 1868, in Westminster. Before the association formed, Protestant clergy met individually to discuss the usefulness of religious education, Sunday school classes and ways to extend their influence throughout the county. The group, comprising delegates from all Protestant denominations in Carroll County, met formally for the first time in 1867 and created the Sabbath-school association. -- History of Western Maryland, Volume 2 by J. Thomas Scharf, Page 822. Compiled by Sun researcher Shelia Jackson
NEWS
December 30, 1997
IF THE recent controversy over opening the Jewish Community Center in Owings Mills on Saturdays proved anything it is that disputes within religions are the norm, not the exception. There is no unified point of view, only shades of differing opinions.Disagreements over the degree of religious orthodoxy are common, whether the issue is ordaining women priests in Roman Catholicism, sanctioning gay rights or opening a Jewish activities center on that religion's Sabbath.To the growing number of Orthodox Jews in Northwest Baltimore, the 34-7 vote of the JCC's board to open athletic and exercise rooms Saturday afternoons was a deep affront to the sanctity of their religion.
NEWS
By CARRIE MASON-DRAFFEN | September 21, 2005
I am a bank customer-service employee who works three days a week. My supervisor wants me to expand my days to include Saturdays, but I observe the Sabbath. Can the bank force me to work that day? State and federal statutes that prohibit religious discrimination require some form of accommodation, within reason. "There is a requirement to accommodate under Title VII," said Louis Graziano, a senior trial attorney in the Manhattan office of the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, which enforces Title VII and other federal anti-bias statutes.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | May 28, 2009
Local Jewish leaders voted Wednesday to open a community center in Owings Mills on Saturdays, drawing expressions of both hope and sadness from across Baltimore's diverse Jewish community. The issue has highlighted a deep divide between the Orthodox and the rest of the Jewish community, and after the vote by the board of directors of the Associated: Jewish Community Federation of Greater Baltimore, leaders on both sides said they would work to improve communications. After weeks of debate, the Associated board voted 97 to 33 to allow the Jewish Community Center of Greater Baltimore to open its Owings Mills location on Saturdays - the Jewish sabbath - beginning June 6. "The decision will give the JCC more of an opportunity to serve Jewish people in the Owings Mills area who ... do not automatically affiliate with Jewish organizations," said JCC President Louis "Buddy" Sapolsky.
NEWS
May 20, 2009
The following are selected comments from the blog www.baltimoresun.com/secondopinion on whether the Owings Mills Jewish Community Center should be open on Saturdays. And on the Seventh Day, the Lord said, "Let there be racquetball." And he brought forth all manner of recreational activities, and it was good. Jeff "Even more than the Jews have kept the Shabbos (Sabbath), the Shabbos has kept the Jews." This deep insight from the Torah tradition contains profound spiritual, psychological and sociological truths.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Matthew Hay Brown,matthew.brown@baltsun.com | May 18, 2009
For Yoel Benyowitz, setting aside work at sundown on Friday, lighting the shabbos candles and spending the next 24 hours in prayer and fellowship with family and friends "recharges our batteries, both physically and spiritually." It's an experience that he wishes more Jews enjoyed. The 47-year-old father of four, a computer information specialist with the state Department of Transportation, joined thousands of fellow Orthodox Jews in Park Heights on Sunday for a rally to promote observance of the Jewish Sabbath.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown | May 14, 2009
Opponents of a controversial plan to open the Jewish Community Center in Owings Mills on Saturday are planning a rally this weekend in defense of the Jewish Sabbath. "It's not a negative rally, it's a positive rally to cause awareness of the sacredness of the observance of the Sabbath," said Eli Schlossberg, an organizer of the event set for noon Sunday at Northwestern High School in Park Heights. From sundown Friday each week until nightfall Saturday, Orthodox and some other Jews observe Shabbat by refraining from work, handling money, driving a car, answering the telephone or operating electrical appliances.
SPORTS
By RICK MAESE | July 27, 2008
Is today the day? Usually, your Sunday morning anticipation revolves around the crossword puzzle, political talk shows, perhaps brunch plans or counting down the days until Week 1 of the NFL season. Maybe even snagging an extra thimble of wine at morning service. But not this summer. Not in Baltimore. We wake up once a week wondering whether this is finally the Sunday - oh, cursed Sabbath - the Orioles can finally post a win. It's the most curious and inexplicable stat, fact or truth of the baseball season.
NEWS
By Christopher D. Ringwald | September 14, 2007
ALBANY, N.Y. -- As religious leaders and their congregations go green, they've neglected one Judeo-Christian teaching that could cut energy consumption and pollution by 14.2857 percent. That's one-seventh, just as the Sabbath halts work one day out of the weekly seven. The day of rest - long considered a gift from God - is meant to create a joyful, liberating respite from worldly concerns such as work and consumption, both activities that use the Earth's resources. So renewed observance of the Sabbath could also be a gift to the air, land and water that we consume the other six days of the week.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 29, 2003
JERUSALEM - Prime Minister Ariel Sharon's new coalition government faced its first mini-crisis yesterday over working on the Sabbath, a sensitive issue that splits many secular and religious Israelis. Ehud Olmert, the minister of industry and trade, ordered an indefinite suspension of the job carried out by government inspectors who enforce laws banning work on the Sabbath. The ministry planned to review the policy and might formulate new guidelines. The decision provoked strong protests from religious groups, including the National Religious Party, a key member of Sharon's right-wing coalition, which was formed just a month ago after national elections.
NEWS
By Paul McMullen and Ken Rosenthal and Paul McMullen and Ken Rosenthal,SUN STAFF | September 11, 1999
Tamir Goodman, one of the most publicized recruits in the history of Maryland basketball, told the Terps yesterday that he would decline the scholarship offer he orally accepted from the university last January.Goodman, an Orthodox Jew, said he changed his mind after a Sept. 2 meeting with Maryland coach Gary Williams, citing friction with the Maryland coaching staff over his refusal to play on the Jewish Sabbath."It was very discouraging," Goodman, 17, said of the meeting. "It would have been better off if they would have said [in January]
NEWS
By Sumathi Reddy and Sumathi Reddy,Sun reporter | May 8, 2007
The vote from the Strathmore Tower condominium board was simple: Down with the Sabbath elevator. But what some thought was a straightforward vote has erupted into a religious and racially tinged controversy to others in this majority senior citizen-occupied condominium complex in Upper Park Heights. The supporters - most of whom are Jewish - say the option for a Sabbath elevator wouldn't have cost extra money and would have aided Orthodox Jewish and disabled residents while helping resale prices.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Julie Scharper,Sun reporter | November 21, 2006
Ever since his son Sam was born five years ago, David Brown has observed the Sabbath with his family, singing, praying and enjoying a large meal in their Pikesville home. For Orthodox Jews like the Brown family, the time between sunset Friday and sunset Saturday is a holiday during which work, even flicking a light switch, should be avoided. "One of my biggest fears, one of the things I never wanted to happen, was for my family to sit down for Shabbos dinner and to have my chair be empty," he said.
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