Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSabah
IN THE NEWS

Sabah

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Sun Staff Correspondent | May 21, 1995
Kota Kinabalu, Malaysia -- loating with my older daughter in the warm, clear waters of the Sulu Sea, I noticed that my wife had come down to the shoreline of our little island and was motioning that we ought to come ashore -- now. Shark? Nah, she'd be motioning really frantically. Still, she can be a study in understatement. Better get in, quickly.And so we came to be squinting at what appeared to be a 3-foot-long dark log floating at beach's edge -- a log, that is, until it took on the fierce shape of a small crocodile with four webbed feet, powerful tail and a reptilian tongue flicking the air to assess our scent.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 22, 2006
DUBAI, United Arab Emirates --A succession crisis in Kuwait continued yesterday, as the country's Cabinet began proceedings to remove the new emir, who is ailing. The extraordinary move occurred amid growing concern over who should lead the oil-rich city-state after the death of Emir Sheik Jaber al-Ahmad al-Sabah on Jan. 15. The crown prince, Sheik Saad al-Abdullah al-Sabah, believed to be 76, became emir under the constitution, and he has insisted that parliament call a special session to allow him to take the oath of office.
Advertisement
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 22, 2006
DUBAI, United Arab Emirates --A succession crisis in Kuwait continued yesterday, as the country's Cabinet began proceedings to remove the new emir, who is ailing. The extraordinary move occurred amid growing concern over who should lead the oil-rich city-state after the death of Emir Sheik Jaber al-Ahmad al-Sabah on Jan. 15. The crown prince, Sheik Saad al-Abdullah al-Sabah, believed to be 76, became emir under the constitution, and he has insisted that parliament call a special session to allow him to take the oath of office.
NEWS
January 15, 2006
KUWAIT CITY -- Sheik Jaber Al Ahmad Al Sabah, the emir of Kuwait who survived an assassination attempt in the 1980s and a decade later escaped Iraqi troops invading his oil-rich Persian Gulf state, died today, state television announced. The sheik, who had been ailing since suffering a brain hemorrhage five years ago, was 79. Crown Prince Sheik Saad Al Abdullah Al Sabah, a distant cousin chosen by the emir as his heir apparent in 1978, takes over as ruler of the tiny oil-rich country - a key U.S. ally in the Middle East.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | December 9, 1990
"The exhibit has become symbolic," said Sheika Hussah. "These things are in exile as we all are. And they are a product of Islamic civilization as we are."Sheika Hussah Sabah al-Salem al-Sabah, co-owner with her husband of the al-Sabah collection from which selections are now on view at the Walters Art Gallery, is a member of Kuwait's ruling family who has been living in exile since the Iraqi invasion in August. In mid-October, she came to the United States to announce that the American tour of the exhibit would proceed as scheduled, and while in Baltimore spoke of the collection and the exhibit.
NEWS
April 23, 1991
Since coalition troops cleared Kuwait of Iraqi occupation in February, the government of Kuwait has been a disappointment to its people and its friends. Whatever services operate were restored by U.S. personnel. Kuwaiti authorities have lagged in reconstruction, even in the preliminaries. And there is no excuse: For seven months in exile, Kuwait's rulers had little to do but plan for the return.If Kuwait has heroes, they are the people who stayed put when Iraq's tanks rumbled in, who endured the atrocities and provided the resistance that helped achieve the restoration.
NEWS
January 15, 2006
KUWAIT CITY -- Sheik Jaber Al Ahmad Al Sabah, the emir of Kuwait who survived an assassination attempt in the 1980s and a decade later escaped Iraqi troops invading his oil-rich Persian Gulf state, died today, state television announced. The sheik, who had been ailing since suffering a brain hemorrhage five years ago, was 79. Crown Prince Sheik Saad Al Abdullah Al Sabah, a distant cousin chosen by the emir as his heir apparent in 1978, takes over as ruler of the tiny oil-rich country - a key U.S. ally in the Middle East.
NEWS
By Tyler Marshall, John Daniszewski and Mark Magnier and Tyler Marshall, John Daniszewski and Mark Magnier,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 6, 2003
DOHA, Qatar - An Iraqi leader unleashed a vitriolic attack on Kuwaiti delegates to an emergency meeting of Muslim nations yesterday, turning a last-ditch attempt to avoid war into a televised verbal mugging that further frayed emotions throughout the Islamic world. After denouncing Kuwait's Foreign Minister Sheik Sabah al Ahmed al Jabbar for allowing American forces to mass in his country, Iraqi envoy Izzat Ibrahim al-Douri then hurled insults at Sabah's deputy who had stood up to defend his minister.
NEWS
March 11, 1991
Given the experience of Grenada and Panama after their liberation by American armed forces, Kuwait has no reason to expect that democracy and a better social system will spring forth like a well-watered rose garden. But unlike poor Grenada and Panama, which have never received the full measure of U.S. largess they expected, the emirate on the Persian Gulf is rich in oil resources once the fires ignited by Saddam Hussein's marauders are put out. Its ruling family has the wallet to make things better all by itself (to paraphrase President Bush)
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 27, 1990
One of the first tasks assigned to Iraqi troops when they invaded Kuwait Aug. 2 was to capture or kill the emir of Kuwait. But, alerted about the invasion, he fled by car to Saudi Arabia minutes before the first Iraqi soldiers entered the grounds of Dasman Palace.The Iraqis wanted to consolidate their seizure of Kuwait by capturing and probably killing the estimated 1,200 Sabahs who form the vast clan whose name has been associated with the existence of a Kuwaiti entity since the 18th century.
NEWS
By Tyler Marshall, John Daniszewski and Mark Magnier and Tyler Marshall, John Daniszewski and Mark Magnier,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 6, 2003
DOHA, Qatar - An Iraqi leader unleashed a vitriolic attack on Kuwaiti delegates to an emergency meeting of Muslim nations yesterday, turning a last-ditch attempt to avoid war into a televised verbal mugging that further frayed emotions throughout the Islamic world. After denouncing Kuwait's Foreign Minister Sheik Sabah al Ahmed al Jabbar for allowing American forces to mass in his country, Iraqi envoy Izzat Ibrahim al-Douri then hurled insults at Sabah's deputy who had stood up to defend his minister.
NEWS
By Richard Reeves | March 11, 1997
JAKARTA -- More than 200 Chinese refugees in leaky fishing boats found safety early last month on the beaches of one of Indonesia's more than 17,000 islands. They were not wanted here. Local authorities allowed the refugees to patch their craft, gave them some rice, and pushed them off, pointing in the general direction of New Zealand.At the same time, the government of Indonesia was, officially and unofficially, pressing Malaysia to accept hundreds of thousands of undocumented Indonesians illegally working or looking for work in Malaysia's Sabah Province in Borneo, an island divided between those two countries and the Sultanate of Brunei.
FEATURES
By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Sun Staff Correspondent | May 21, 1995
Kota Kinabalu, Malaysia -- loating with my older daughter in the warm, clear waters of the Sulu Sea, I noticed that my wife had come down to the shoreline of our little island and was motioning that we ought to come ashore -- now. Shark? Nah, she'd be motioning really frantically. Still, she can be a study in understatement. Better get in, quickly.And so we came to be squinting at what appeared to be a 3-foot-long dark log floating at beach's edge -- a log, that is, until it took on the fierce shape of a small crocodile with four webbed feet, powerful tail and a reptilian tongue flicking the air to assess our scent.
NEWS
April 23, 1991
Since coalition troops cleared Kuwait of Iraqi occupation in February, the government of Kuwait has been a disappointment to its people and its friends. Whatever services operate were restored by U.S. personnel. Kuwaiti authorities have lagged in reconstruction, even in the preliminaries. And there is no excuse: For seven months in exile, Kuwait's rulers had little to do but plan for the return.If Kuwait has heroes, they are the people who stayed put when Iraq's tanks rumbled in, who endured the atrocities and provided the resistance that helped achieve the restoration.
NEWS
March 11, 1991
Given the experience of Grenada and Panama after their liberation by American armed forces, Kuwait has no reason to expect that democracy and a better social system will spring forth like a well-watered rose garden. But unlike poor Grenada and Panama, which have never received the full measure of U.S. largess they expected, the emirate on the Persian Gulf is rich in oil resources once the fires ignited by Saddam Hussein's marauders are put out. Its ruling family has the wallet to make things better all by itself (to paraphrase President Bush)
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | December 9, 1990
"The exhibit has become symbolic," said Sheika Hussah. "These things are in exile as we all are. And they are a product of Islamic civilization as we are."Sheika Hussah Sabah al-Salem al-Sabah, co-owner with her husband of the al-Sabah collection from which selections are now on view at the Walters Art Gallery, is a member of Kuwait's ruling family who has been living in exile since the Iraqi invasion in August. In mid-October, she came to the United States to announce that the American tour of the exhibit would proceed as scheduled, and while in Baltimore spoke of the collection and the exhibit.
NEWS
By Richard Reeves | March 11, 1997
JAKARTA -- More than 200 Chinese refugees in leaky fishing boats found safety early last month on the beaches of one of Indonesia's more than 17,000 islands. They were not wanted here. Local authorities allowed the refugees to patch their craft, gave them some rice, and pushed them off, pointing in the general direction of New Zealand.At the same time, the government of Indonesia was, officially and unofficially, pressing Malaysia to accept hundreds of thousands of undocumented Indonesians illegally working or looking for work in Malaysia's Sabah Province in Borneo, an island divided between those two countries and the Sultanate of Brunei.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | December 9, 1990
The dramatically -- but not harshly -- lighted column capital that greets visitors to the Walters Art Gallery's exhibit of Islamic art is both familiar and foreign. The volutes at its four corners and the acanthus leaves below them remind us of classical columns, but the floral motifs that cover the surface do not.The Arabic inscriptions may be in an unknown language, but they announce the name of the patron (Caliph Al-Hakam II), the maker (Falih), the project supervisor (Taled) and the date (362, the Islamic equivalent of 972-973 A.D.)
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | December 9, 1990
The dramatically -- but not harshly -- lighted column capital that greets visitors to the Walters Art Gallery's exhibit of Islamic art is both familiar and foreign. The volutes at its four corners and the acanthus leaves below them remind us of classical columns, but the floral motifs that cover the surface do not.The Arabic inscriptions may be in an unknown language, but they announce the name of the patron (Caliph Al-Hakam II), the maker (Falih), the project supervisor (Taled) and the date (362, the Islamic equivalent of 972-973 A.D.)
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Sun Staff Correspondent | October 11, 1990
AQABA, Jordan -- Muhammed Sabah has one of the world's least rewarding jobs these days. He is a Jordanian truck driver.A trucker who used to roll regularly up and down the road from this Jordanian port to Iraq, he now has nowhere to go and nothing to carry."
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.