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NEWS
November 7, 2004
On November 5, 2004 MARGOT SAAR beloved wife of the late Ludvig Saar; devoted mother of Mari A. Vlachos, Peter Saar and Paul Saar; loving grandmother of James Kozlowski, Joosep Paul Saar and Linda Willin; loving great-grandmother of Chandler, Hunter and Regan Kozlowski. A Funeral Service will be held at the family owned Ruck Towson Funeral Home, Inc., 1050 York Road (Beltway Exit 26A) on Tuesday at 10 a.m. Interment Moreland Memorial Park. Friends may call on Monday from 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 p.m. Those desiring may make contributions to The Baltimore Estonian School, 1930 Belair Road, Baltimore, MD 21213 or The Arthritis Foundation, 1777 Reisterstown Road, Baltimore, MD 21208.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN REPORTER | November 23, 2006
Maryland Public Safety Secretary Mary Ann Saar announced yesterday that she is retiring, making her the first in what is expected to be a stream of high-level state officials who step down as Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s term in office winds to a close. "She is retiring effective Jan. 17," said Jacqui Lampell, a spokeswoman for the agency. "She had made up her mind to go and had been talking about retiring for quite some time." Saar, 65, has worked for Democrats, Republicans and independents.
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NEWS
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Evening Sun Staff | September 4, 1991
An informal resume for Mary Ann Saar might identify her as a tough-as-nails prosecutor, a William Donald Schaefer loyalist and woman who once exchanged gunfire with three would-be robbers.She made her reputation in the city's criminal courts, where she was Maryland's first female chief deputy under then-State's Attorney William A. Swisher. She left the courtroom in 1983 for a series of political appointments under Schaefer, beginning with the Mayor's Coordinating Council on Criminal Justice.
NEWS
August 13, 2006
Last week, Mary Ann Saar was on the hot seat in the wake of the fatal stabbing last month of a correctional officer while on duty - the second such murder of a prison guard this year. As disturbing as those deaths were, also disturbing was the approach taken by some of those criticizing Ms. Saar, chief of the state's public safety and correctional services. There is certainly reason for alarm. Attacks on correctional officers have increased in the last year, and it makes perfect sense to try to find out why that is and what can be done to reverse the trend, if it is one. We know one of the answers to the first question: large numbers of staff vacancies, particularly in Baltimore and at the House of Corrections in Jessup.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN REPORTER | November 23, 2006
Maryland Public Safety Secretary Mary Ann Saar announced yesterday that she is retiring, making her the first in what is expected to be a stream of high-level state officials who step down as Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s term in office winds to a close. "She is retiring effective Jan. 17," said Jacqui Lampell, a spokeswoman for the agency. "She had made up her mind to go and had been talking about retiring for quite some time." Saar, 65, has worked for Democrats, Republicans and independents.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | March 18, 2003
The first time William Donald Schaefer met Mary Ann Saar, he made small talk with her -- as he said he would with "any pretty lady." "I said, `Hello, isn't it a nice day out?'" Schaefer recalled of the meeting 20 years ago, when he was Baltimore mayor. "And she said, `Yes it is, now down to business.' I liked that." Saar's unflappable demeanor and three decades in public service helped the Democrat and former Schaefer aide easily win Senate confirmation last month as secretary of the Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services.
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,SUN STAFF | November 6, 2003
In a recognition that get-tough prison policies have failed to prevent repeat offenders, the Ehrlich administration announced yesterday a shift toward rehabilitation, proposing programs to educate inmates and improve their behavior. But with the state facing a revenue shortfall, all but $2 million of the annual cost would be financed by juggling the correctional payroll over the next three years - filling an expected 218 correctional officer vacancies with 210 teachers, counselors and social workers, a tactic that also would avoid layoffs.
NEWS
By GADI DECHTER and GADI DECHTER,SUN REPORTER | August 8, 2006
On the eve of an emergency legislative hearing into deadly conditions at Maryland correctional facilities, Public Safety and Correctional Services Secretary Mary Ann Saar declined to express confidence in her prison chief, and said changes to top staff are being considered. Asked yesterday during a conference call with reporters whether she had confidence in Division of Correction Commissioner Frank C. Sizer Jr., Saar said, "I deal through my deputy [Mary Livers], in whom I have a great deal of confidence.
NEWS
By JENNIFER MCMENAMIN and JENNIFER MCMENAMIN,SUN REPORTER | June 28, 2006
Public Safety Secretary Mary Ann Saar reversed a decision yesterday by an administrative law judge that could have forced Maryland prison officials to redevelop procedures for putting to death condemned killers. In a case stemming from a grievance filed by death row inmate Vernon Lee Evans Jr., Saar rejected the judge's finding that the state's execution protocols are regulations, meaning they need to be developed and adopted with legislative oversight and public input. "While there is certainly a widespread interest in Maryland and throughout the nation regarding the death penalty, the actual procedures involved in the execution of an individual concern only a very limited number of persons," Saar wrote in her order, reiterating her department's claim that the procedures laid out in the Execution Operations Manual do not have "general application."
NEWS
August 9, 2006
Mary Ann Saar isn't easily intimidated. The corrections union is calling for her head and state lawmakers are calling her to task for understaffing in Maryland prisons. But Ms. Saar, the state's public safety secretary, is confident that her agency is on track to fill those gaps - and statistics from her office bear out her assertion. The secretary says she is staying the course. And the only deviation so far has been her decision to try to demolish the antiquated House of Correction sooner.
NEWS
By GREG GARLAND and GREG GARLAND,SUN REPORTER | August 9, 2006
Inmate assaults on Maryland correctional officers rose sharply from 2003 to 2005 -- a time when staff positions were being eliminated, overtime budgets were cut and vacancies went unfilled, a legislative panel was told yesterday. A report summarizing how prison staffing levels affect safety was prepared by nonpartisan legislative analysts, who presented their findings to a joint hearing of Senate and House subcommittees in Annapolis yesterday. The legislators met in emergency session to discuss a wave of recent prison violence, including the fatal stabbing of a correctional officer at the House of Correction in Jessup last month.
NEWS
August 9, 2006
Mary Ann Saar isn't easily intimidated. The corrections union is calling for her head and state lawmakers are calling her to task for understaffing in Maryland prisons. But Ms. Saar, the state's public safety secretary, is confident that her agency is on track to fill those gaps - and statistics from her office bear out her assertion. The secretary says she is staying the course. And the only deviation so far has been her decision to try to demolish the antiquated House of Correction sooner.
NEWS
By GADI DECHTER and GADI DECHTER,SUN REPORTER | August 8, 2006
On the eve of an emergency legislative hearing into deadly conditions at Maryland correctional facilities, Public Safety and Correctional Services Secretary Mary Ann Saar declined to express confidence in her prison chief, and said changes to top staff are being considered. Asked yesterday during a conference call with reporters whether she had confidence in Division of Correction Commissioner Frank C. Sizer Jr., Saar said, "I deal through my deputy [Mary Livers], in whom I have a great deal of confidence.
NEWS
By MICHAEL DRESSER | July 12, 2006
This lightly sweet, low-alcohol (8.5 percent) German riesling is ideal for casual summertime quaffing. Its acidity balances out the sugar so that there's nothing cloying about it. It boasts lively and penetrating flavors of honey, apples, peaches, cherries and minerals, as well as a pleasingly creamy texture. The screw cap makes it convenient for picnics. Serve with spicy fried chicken, Southeast Asian cuisine.
NEWS
By JENNIFER MCMENAMIN and JENNIFER MCMENAMIN,SUN REPORTER | June 28, 2006
Public Safety Secretary Mary Ann Saar reversed a decision yesterday by an administrative law judge that could have forced Maryland prison officials to redevelop procedures for putting to death condemned killers. In a case stemming from a grievance filed by death row inmate Vernon Lee Evans Jr., Saar rejected the judge's finding that the state's execution protocols are regulations, meaning they need to be developed and adopted with legislative oversight and public input. "While there is certainly a widespread interest in Maryland and throughout the nation regarding the death penalty, the actual procedures involved in the execution of an individual concern only a very limited number of persons," Saar wrote in her order, reiterating her department's claim that the procedures laid out in the Execution Operations Manual do not have "general application."
NEWS
March 8, 2006
On March 2, 2006, HARRIETTE (nee Salm) beloved wife of the late Artur Saar, devoted mother of Maie Tarvis-Laanemeis, dear grandmother of Heli Aigro, great-grandmother of Martin Aigro, loving sister of Aurilie, dear friend of Buddy and Susan Beasley and family. A memorial service will be held at St. Marks Estonian Church on Saturday 11 A.M. Interment private. Arrangements by the Leonard J. Ruck Inc., Funeral Home.
NEWS
By GREG GARLAND and GREG GARLAND,SUN REPORTER | August 9, 2006
Inmate assaults on Maryland correctional officers rose sharply from 2003 to 2005 -- a time when staff positions were being eliminated, overtime budgets were cut and vacancies went unfilled, a legislative panel was told yesterday. A report summarizing how prison staffing levels affect safety was prepared by nonpartisan legislative analysts, who presented their findings to a joint hearing of Senate and House subcommittees in Annapolis yesterday. The legislators met in emergency session to discuss a wave of recent prison violence, including the fatal stabbing of a correctional officer at the House of Correction in Jessup last month.
NEWS
September 29, 2004
WHEN MARYLAND prison guards must forcibly remove an inmate from a cell, they are required to videotape the action. This is to document the "extraction" and determine if staffers followed procedure in restraining a prisoner. That's sound public policy because it protects the interests of the state and the rights of the imprisoned. When questions arise, the state has a ready -- and recorded -- response. For that reason, state prisons chief Mary Ann Saar's refusal to release such a videotape in the April death of inmate Ifeanyi A. Iko is unacceptable.
NEWS
November 7, 2004
On November 5, 2004 MARGOT SAAR beloved wife of the late Ludvig Saar; devoted mother of Mari A. Vlachos, Peter Saar and Paul Saar; loving grandmother of James Kozlowski, Joosep Paul Saar and Linda Willin; loving great-grandmother of Chandler, Hunter and Regan Kozlowski. A Funeral Service will be held at the family owned Ruck Towson Funeral Home, Inc., 1050 York Road (Beltway Exit 26A) on Tuesday at 10 a.m. Interment Moreland Memorial Park. Friends may call on Monday from 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 p.m. Those desiring may make contributions to The Baltimore Estonian School, 1930 Belair Road, Baltimore, MD 21213 or The Arthritis Foundation, 1777 Reisterstown Road, Baltimore, MD 21208.
NEWS
September 29, 2004
WHEN MARYLAND prison guards must forcibly remove an inmate from a cell, they are required to videotape the action. This is to document the "extraction" and determine if staffers followed procedure in restraining a prisoner. That's sound public policy because it protects the interests of the state and the rights of the imprisoned. When questions arise, the state has a ready -- and recorded -- response. For that reason, state prisons chief Mary Ann Saar's refusal to release such a videotape in the April death of inmate Ifeanyi A. Iko is unacceptable.
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