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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 26, 2011
Blackwater Distilling is set to begin bottling Sloop Betty vodka in Stevensville next month, marking the resumption after nearly 30 years of the proud tradition of distilling spirits in Maryland. "There's something about bringing that industry back that means something," Christopher Cook , a partner with his brother Jonathan in Blackwater, told Baltimore Sun reporter Jill Rosen recently. During rye whiskey's golden age, connoisseurs across the land instantly associated Wight's Sherbrook, Old Reserve, Ryebrook, Mount Vernon, Sherwood Pure Rye, Hunter's — "First Over the Bars" — and Pikesville Rye, to name only a few that were once distilled here, with Maryland.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2013
Kevin Plank may have sold the first Under Armour shirts from the back of his car, but as his reach has grown, so too have his wheels: These days, he jets around the world, recently to five Asian cities in six days, but managed to get back home to Baltimore to watch a member of his celebrity-filled stable of athletes play in a game. That would be his 9-year-old son, James, playing in a Little League game in Baltimore County. Like any sideline dad, Plank showed off a few photos on his cellphone, scenes from a spring evening more Norman Rockwell than Under Armour, whose thumping ads feature glaring athletes seemingly in training not for a mere game but a coming apocalypse.
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NEWS
February 28, 2011
Frederick Rasmussen's article on Maryland straight rye whiskey ("Rye whiskey was once synonymous with Maryland," Feb. 27) evoked powerful but conflicting emotions in this transplanted Southern bourbon drinker (and, alas, now long time teetotaler.) For a moment I could almost taste the acrid shot of Pikesville and feel its warm glow as it travelled down the old alimentary canal, to be followed, at a decent interval, by a cool, contrasting and modest sip or two of National Bohemian. But my warm reminiscences are tinged with vague feelings of guilt.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Meekah Hopkins | November 30, 2011
Don't be fooled. Silo.5%, the new wine bar in Locust Point, stands out for more than their extensive list of vino. The scene - a modern lounge with black leather furniture, intimately arranged; the bar - a clean slate-marble accented in green lighting; and the scenery - a panoramic glass exterior opens to a harbor view. It's a perfect venue for a cool, casual cocktail date. Its drink menu runs seamlessly together with its style - classic with a modern edge. My favorite, Catch U in the Rye, is a spicy, sexy take on an old-school American favorite: the Manhattan.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Meekah Hopkins | November 30, 2011
Don't be fooled. Silo.5%, the new wine bar in Locust Point, stands out for more than their extensive list of vino. The scene - a modern lounge with black leather furniture, intimately arranged; the bar - a clean slate-marble accented in green lighting; and the scenery - a panoramic glass exterior opens to a harbor view. It's a perfect venue for a cool, casual cocktail date. Its drink menu runs seamlessly together with its style - classic with a modern edge. My favorite, Catch U in the Rye, is a spicy, sexy take on an old-school American favorite: the Manhattan.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | May 2, 2001
FOR MOST Kentuckians, the mint julep is sacrosanct, ranking right up there with Secretariat and boys named Jim-Bob as established parts of the state's heritage. Now comes a claim that the mint julep, the drink that makes millions swoon every Derby Day, has its roots in Southern Maryland. Moreover, the claimant contends that bluegrass imbibers are using the wrong whiskey in the drink. A true julep contains rye whiskey, distilled from rye grain, not bourbon, which is made with corn. So says Bruce A. Perrygo, a 52-year-old schoolteacher in St. Mary's County and a confirmed rye fan. He made these bold claims in a letter to me, a confirmed bourbon man. He repeated them in a recent telephone conversation conducted from his home in Southern Maryland, where, he says, he likes to sit on his porch, sip juleps and watch fish jump in Combs Creek.
FEATURES
By Beth Hannan and Beth Hannan,Contributing Writer | November 17, 1993
What is it about a simple confection made of nuts, cherries, dates, pineapple, liquor, flour and sugar that causes such controversy? The fruitcake love-it-or-hate-it battle has raged for some time, but according to our Sundial poll, the lovers are stomping the haters and trying to win fruitcake some respect.Of the 56 calls we received when our question ran last Wednesday, 46 liked (perhaps I should say loved) fruitcake, four disliked fruitcake (hate might be a better word) and four people didn't leave a comment.
NEWS
By Sara Engram and Sara Engram,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 28, 2003
There was a time when sipping rye whiskey was as much a Maryland custom as picking crabs. Maryland was rye country, with its whiskey made from a happy combination of abundant crops of rye and water naturally purified by limestone in the earth. Yet in recent years rye has been eclipsed by clear spirits like vodka, rum and tequila. While bourbon and scotch retain many fans, rye has virtually disappeared from public bars. Some newer mixology reference books don't even contain recipes using rye whiskey, and liquor stores report very small sales.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2013
Kevin Plank may have sold the first Under Armour shirts from the back of his car, but as his reach has grown, so too have his wheels: These days, he jets around the world, recently to five Asian cities in six days, but managed to get back home to Baltimore to watch a member of his celebrity-filled stable of athletes play in a game. That would be his 9-year-old son, James, playing in a Little League game in Baltimore County. Like any sideline dad, Plank showed off a few photos on his cellphone, scenes from a spring evening more Norman Rockwell than Under Armour, whose thumping ads feature glaring athletes seemingly in training not for a mere game but a coming apocalypse.
NEWS
By Sara Engram and Sara Engram,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 18, 2002
In a season of giving, there's a lot to be said for something that asks only to be unwrapped, sipped and savored. For a gift that can bring pleasure without requiring long-term storage, a fine bottle can provide a lot of cheer. Local wine and liquor stores have a wide range of choices, often in attractive gift packaging and sometimes even carrying an extra holiday bonus. John Coleman of Sutton Place Gourmet says most bottlers are producing their holiday gift boxes at no extra charge. Some are even offering glasses, for those who don't mind brandishing an ad on their glass.
NEWS
February 28, 2011
Frederick Rasmussen's article on Maryland straight rye whiskey ("Rye whiskey was once synonymous with Maryland," Feb. 27) evoked powerful but conflicting emotions in this transplanted Southern bourbon drinker (and, alas, now long time teetotaler.) For a moment I could almost taste the acrid shot of Pikesville and feel its warm glow as it travelled down the old alimentary canal, to be followed, at a decent interval, by a cool, contrasting and modest sip or two of National Bohemian. But my warm reminiscences are tinged with vague feelings of guilt.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 26, 2011
Blackwater Distilling is set to begin bottling Sloop Betty vodka in Stevensville next month, marking the resumption after nearly 30 years of the proud tradition of distilling spirits in Maryland. "There's something about bringing that industry back that means something," Christopher Cook , a partner with his brother Jonathan in Blackwater, told Baltimore Sun reporter Jill Rosen recently. During rye whiskey's golden age, connoisseurs across the land instantly associated Wight's Sherbrook, Old Reserve, Ryebrook, Mount Vernon, Sherwood Pure Rye, Hunter's — "First Over the Bars" — and Pikesville Rye, to name only a few that were once distilled here, with Maryland.
NEWS
By Sara Engram and Sara Engram,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 28, 2003
There was a time when sipping rye whiskey was as much a Maryland custom as picking crabs. Maryland was rye country, with its whiskey made from a happy combination of abundant crops of rye and water naturally purified by limestone in the earth. Yet in recent years rye has been eclipsed by clear spirits like vodka, rum and tequila. While bourbon and scotch retain many fans, rye has virtually disappeared from public bars. Some newer mixology reference books don't even contain recipes using rye whiskey, and liquor stores report very small sales.
NEWS
By Sara Engram and Sara Engram,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 18, 2002
In a season of giving, there's a lot to be said for something that asks only to be unwrapped, sipped and savored. For a gift that can bring pleasure without requiring long-term storage, a fine bottle can provide a lot of cheer. Local wine and liquor stores have a wide range of choices, often in attractive gift packaging and sometimes even carrying an extra holiday bonus. John Coleman of Sutton Place Gourmet says most bottlers are producing their holiday gift boxes at no extra charge. Some are even offering glasses, for those who don't mind brandishing an ad on their glass.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | May 2, 2001
FOR MOST Kentuckians, the mint julep is sacrosanct, ranking right up there with Secretariat and boys named Jim-Bob as established parts of the state's heritage. Now comes a claim that the mint julep, the drink that makes millions swoon every Derby Day, has its roots in Southern Maryland. Moreover, the claimant contends that bluegrass imbibers are using the wrong whiskey in the drink. A true julep contains rye whiskey, distilled from rye grain, not bourbon, which is made with corn. So says Bruce A. Perrygo, a 52-year-old schoolteacher in St. Mary's County and a confirmed rye fan. He made these bold claims in a letter to me, a confirmed bourbon man. He repeated them in a recent telephone conversation conducted from his home in Southern Maryland, where, he says, he likes to sit on his porch, sip juleps and watch fish jump in Combs Creek.
NEWS
November 10, 1996
ASK ABOUT Pikesville rye these days and chances are Marylanders will more readily identify it as a country music band than as a whiskey that once was distilled in Baltimore and enjoyed throughout the region. Will the same thing happen to National Bohemian beer, a favorite Baltimore brew for 111 years (except during Prohibition) after Stroh's closes its Halethorpe brewery and transfers the production of the brand to Pennsylvania?These are unsettling days for the nation's industrial brewers.
NEWS
November 10, 1996
ASK ABOUT Pikesville rye these days and chances are Marylanders will more readily identify it as a country music band than as a whiskey that once was distilled in Baltimore and enjoyed throughout the region. Will the same thing happen to National Bohemian beer, a favorite Baltimore brew for 111 years (except during Prohibition) after Stroh's closes its Halethorpe brewery and transfers the production of the brand to Pennsylvania?These are unsettling days for the nation's industrial brewers.
NEWS
April 2, 2008
An American original and a traditional favorite of Marylanders, rye whiskey can be as pricey as its better-known cousin, small-batch bourbon. Bottles of aged, 20-year-old rye fetch upward of $100 a bottle. Fortunately, there are a handful of flavorful rye whiskeys at lower prices. These are ryes, if you will, for recessionary times. Rittenhouse Straight Rye Whisky Heaven Hill Distilleries, Bardstown, Ky.$15.99 for 750 milliliters. 100 proof. Reliable Churchill, distributor Produced in what is known as the Pennsylvania style, which apparently is close to how the colonists made whiskey, this rye was named the top North American whiskey of 2006 in a blind tasting in San Francisco.
FEATURES
By Beth Hannan and Beth Hannan,Contributing Writer | November 17, 1993
What is it about a simple confection made of nuts, cherries, dates, pineapple, liquor, flour and sugar that causes such controversy? The fruitcake love-it-or-hate-it battle has raged for some time, but according to our Sundial poll, the lovers are stomping the haters and trying to win fruitcake some respect.Of the 56 calls we received when our question ran last Wednesday, 46 liked (perhaps I should say loved) fruitcake, four disliked fruitcake (hate might be a better word) and four people didn't leave a comment.
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