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By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | December 31, 1997
PASADENA, Calif. -- Washington State quarterback Ryan Leaf has been the other guy all year, so why should the 84th Rose Bowl be any different?He was buried under Peyton Manning's press clippings all season and overlooked by the Heisman voters and, well, pretty much misunderstood by everyone from the residents of his hometown in Great Falls, Mont., to the national media.So, why not tomorrow, when he will take the field against Heisman Trophy winner Charles Woodson and the supposedly soon-to-be-crowned national champion Michigan Wolverines?
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By rick maese and rick maese,rick.maese@baltsun.com | September 7, 2008
As the curtains open on the 2008 season, we've already had a major cast change. No one had even found their seats yet, and already we saw Kyle Boller exit stage left and Joe Flacco enter stage right. The symbolism of the quarterback change glows in neon colors. The Flacco Era begins just as the Boller Error concludes. Boller's season - likely his career in Baltimore - was mercifully cut short because of injury just a few days before Flacco makes his NFL debut. There would be no overlap for the two, save a few weeks of meaningless preseason games, some locker-room chats and maybe breaking bread a few times in the cafeteria.
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SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,SUN STAFF | October 4, 1998
The men who mine the college ranks for NFL talent could see it coming.From the 20 pounds Ryan Leaf put on shortly after Washington State played in the Rose Bowl, to standing up two Indianapolis Colts executives on a scheduled interview, to performing a "Hulk" pose on stage at the league's combine meetings.All of it foretold the bigger problem Leaf would face when he finally hunched behind an NFL center and barked out signals: Immaturity. It showed in everything the 22-year-old quarterback did and didn't do.Five weeks into his rookie season with the San Diego Chargers, Leaf has rewritten the book on boorish behavior.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray | May 26, 2002
Ryan Leaf is running out of time and teams. Once regarded as a franchise quarterback in the NFL, he is now viewed as a salvage-operation project. Once the second pick in the 1998 draft behind Peyton Manning, Leaf is fighting to win the Seattle Seahawks' third-string job against the likes of seventh-round draft pick Jeff Kelly and free-agent rookie Ryan Van Dyke. Worse yet, he's no guarantee to win that third-string job. Seattle is Leaf's fourth team in 15 months. His monumental flop in San Diego cost the Chargers more than $12 million and sent general manager Bobby Beathard into a premature retirement (Beathard only resurfaced this month as an adviser with the Atlanta Falcons)
SPORTS
September 28, 1998
Quotable"We have shown we can play with some of the so-called powerhouses of the AFC. Now we have to show that we can beat them."-- Receiver Yancey Thigpen of the Oilers, who lost to the unbeaten Jaguars to fall to 1-3."I'll probably have this one done up and put it in a place of importance."-- Owner Bill Bidwill, receiving the game ball for the Cardinals' victory in their first regular-season game in St. Louis since he moved the team after the 1987 season."You just wonder, 'Are you good enough to do this?
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,SUN STAFF | December 5, 2000
Just when you thought the Ravens might have a tough time getting serious about the San Diego Chargers, there was this brief from the NFL offices yesterday: A win on Sunday puts them in the AFC playoffs. "That's certainly a carrot to hang out in front of the players," said coach/motivator Brian Billick. "Should we be fortunate enough to achieve that this Sunday, we're not going to pack up our bags and take another two-week vacation and just roll into the playoffs in that capacity. "But clearly to have accomplished that goal with two games remaining in the season would be very satisfying for this team, and we'll adjust our sights at that point.
SPORTS
By Jim Trotter and Jim Trotter,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 9, 2000
The morning after being selected second overall in the 1998 draft, Washington State quarterback Ryan Leaf arrived in San Diego and talked of filling skies with footballs and downtown streets with victory parades. No one laughed. Leaf's right arm was so strong, his personality so brash, his production so staggering in college that talk of division titles and Super Bowls didn't seem premature. Three years later, Leaf is fighting for his San Diego future. His struggles on the field and lackadaisical work habits off it have the Chargers wondering whether it would be in their best interest to trade or release him in the off-season.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | January 2, 1998
PASADENA, Calif. -- Michigan All-American Charles Woodson didn't dominate the 84th Rose Bowl. He didn't single-handedly shut down NFL-bound quarterback Ryan Leaf. He wasn't named the game's Most Outstanding Player.He just did a little of everything as top-ranked Michigan scored a 21-16 victory over Washington State, and he showed again why he recently became the first defensive starter to win the Heisman Trophy.Woodson picked off a pass in the end zone to squelch a promising second-quarter Washington State drive and made a key offensive play as the Wolverines were killing the clock in the final minutes of the game.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray | May 26, 2002
Ryan Leaf is running out of time and teams. Once regarded as a franchise quarterback in the NFL, he is now viewed as a salvage-operation project. Once the second pick in the 1998 draft behind Peyton Manning, Leaf is fighting to win the Seattle Seahawks' third-string job against the likes of seventh-round draft pick Jeff Kelly and free-agent rookie Ryan Van Dyke. Worse yet, he's no guarantee to win that third-string job. Seattle is Leaf's fourth team in 15 months. His monumental flop in San Diego cost the Chargers more than $12 million and sent general manager Bobby Beathard into a premature retirement (Beathard only resurfaced this month as an adviser with the Atlanta Falcons)
SPORTS
By KANSAS CITY STAR | April 18, 2001
Even though the San Diego Chargers were burned the last time they drafted an allegedly can't-miss quarterback, they're almost certain to bet Saturday that Michael Vick won't let them make the same mistake twice. The Chargers were so enamored with Ryan Leaf's potential in 1998 that they traded two first-round picks, a second-round pick and two players to the Arizona Cardinals to move from the third to second spot. That assured the Chargers of getting Peyton Manning or Ryan Leaf, depending upon which quarterback the Indianapolis Colts drafted with the top pick.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN STAFF | December 2, 2001
ASHBURN, Va. -- The usually exacting NFL schedule is throwing the Washington Redskins an odd twist with today's visit to FedEx Field by the Dallas Cowboys. The Redskins (5-5), who dropped a 9-7 decision in Dallas on Oct. 15, play the Cowboys (2-8) at a time when the two teams are heading in opposite directions -- Washington on a five-game win streak, Dallas having won just once since beating the Redskins. But the seeming scheduling gift for the Redskins is negated by the fact that the Cowboys have beaten Washington eight straight times.
SPORTS
By KEN MURRAY | October 7, 2001
Almost overnight, with a run of shrewd moves, John Butler has remade the San Diego Chargers from last year's patsies into this year's Cinderella team. Since he was named general manager on Jan. 5, Butler has swapped the first pick in the draft, hired Norv Turner to be offensive coordinator, signed several players from his old team, the Buffalo Bills, including quarterback Doug Flutie, selected the premier college running back and retooled the organizational outlook. "You don't want to play poker with John Butler right now," said Chargers president Dean Spanos.
SPORTS
By KANSAS CITY STAR | April 18, 2001
Even though the San Diego Chargers were burned the last time they drafted an allegedly can't-miss quarterback, they're almost certain to bet Saturday that Michael Vick won't let them make the same mistake twice. The Chargers were so enamored with Ryan Leaf's potential in 1998 that they traded two first-round picks, a second-round pick and two players to the Arizona Cardinals to move from the third to second spot. That assured the Chargers of getting Peyton Manning or Ryan Leaf, depending upon which quarterback the Indianapolis Colts drafted with the top pick.
SPORTS
By Jim Trotter and Jim Trotter,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 9, 2000
The morning after being selected second overall in the 1998 draft, Washington State quarterback Ryan Leaf arrived in San Diego and talked of filling skies with footballs and downtown streets with victory parades. No one laughed. Leaf's right arm was so strong, his personality so brash, his production so staggering in college that talk of division titles and Super Bowls didn't seem premature. Three years later, Leaf is fighting for his San Diego future. His struggles on the field and lackadaisical work habits off it have the Chargers wondering whether it would be in their best interest to trade or release him in the off-season.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,SUN STAFF | December 5, 2000
Just when you thought the Ravens might have a tough time getting serious about the San Diego Chargers, there was this brief from the NFL offices yesterday: A win on Sunday puts them in the AFC playoffs. "That's certainly a carrot to hang out in front of the players," said coach/motivator Brian Billick. "Should we be fortunate enough to achieve that this Sunday, we're not going to pack up our bags and take another two-week vacation and just roll into the playoffs in that capacity. "But clearly to have accomplished that goal with two games remaining in the season would be very satisfying for this team, and we'll adjust our sights at that point.
SPORTS
By KEN MURRAY and KEN MURRAY,SUN STAFF | November 20, 1998
In a season when Steve DeBerg came out of retirement at age 44, when 35-year-old Randall Cunningham recaptured his former glory, and when 35-year-old Vinny Testaverde finally found a place he could call home, the rules have changed.A young man's game?Not anymore.Not when it comes to quarterbacks, anyway, and especially not when it comes to backup quarterbacks.The phenomenon of the 1998 NFL season is that while it hasalways been difficult for young quarterbacks to succeed,recycled veterans are enjoying a resurgence unlike any in recent years.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | January 2, 1998
PASADENA, Calif. -- The top-ranked Michigan Wolverines had all they could handle yesterday, but they handled No. 8 Washington State just well enough to remain undefeated and, apparently, win their first college football national championship in 50 years.Quarterback Brian Griese, who stayed largely in the shadow of Heisman Trophy-winning teammate Charles Woodson and Cougars quarterback Ryan Leaf during the pre-game buildup, threw three touchdown passes to lead Michigan to a heart-stopping 21-16 victory in the 84th Rose Bowl.
SPORTS
By Ken Rosenthal | December 23, 1997
The Ravens' starting quarterback next season should not be Eric Zeier or Vinny Testaverde. Nor should it be Jim Harbaugh or Jim Kelly.Priority One should be to trade up and get Washington State junior Ryan Leaf -- if, as expected, he enters the draft.Indianapolis is likely to select Peyton Manning No. 1. Arizona selects No. 2, but doesn't need a quarterback, and likely would trade the pick.Ravens owner Art Modell needs to get on the phone with our old friend Bill Bidwill immediately.This isn't about next season.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,SUN STAFF | October 4, 1998
The men who mine the college ranks for NFL talent could see it coming.From the 20 pounds Ryan Leaf put on shortly after Washington State played in the Rose Bowl, to standing up two Indianapolis Colts executives on a scheduled interview, to performing a "Hulk" pose on stage at the league's combine meetings.All of it foretold the bigger problem Leaf would face when he finally hunched behind an NFL center and barked out signals: Immaturity. It showed in everything the 22-year-old quarterback did and didn't do.Five weeks into his rookie season with the San Diego Chargers, Leaf has rewritten the book on boorish behavior.
SPORTS
September 28, 1998
Quotable"We have shown we can play with some of the so-called powerhouses of the AFC. Now we have to show that we can beat them."-- Receiver Yancey Thigpen of the Oilers, who lost to the unbeaten Jaguars to fall to 1-3."I'll probably have this one done up and put it in a place of importance."-- Owner Bill Bidwill, receiving the game ball for the Cardinals' victory in their first regular-season game in St. Louis since he moved the team after the 1987 season."You just wonder, 'Are you good enough to do this?
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