Advertisement
HomeCollectionsRyan Hunter Reay
IN THE NEWS

Ryan Hunter Reay

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2012
When rain began to fall as forecast in Sunday's Grand Prix of Baltimore, Ryan Hunter-Reay's car owner Michael Andretti had a game plan. Andretti's bold decision to stick with the treadless slicks used on a dry track - combined with perhaps an even bolder move by Hunter-Reay to seize the lead on a restart with five laps to go - allowed the driver to pick up his fourth IZOD IndyCar Series victory of the season and keep alive his hopes for a series...
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | September 1, 2013
Ryan Hunter-Reay, who won the IndyCar Series race in last year's Grand Prix of Baltimore, had a tough time defending his championship Sunday. After starting eighth, Hunter-Reay's DHL Chevrolet had “electronics issues” nearly from the start. His car stalled on the first lap and he dropped down to 22nd. After clawing his way back into the top 10, the same problem resurfaced and Hunter-Reay had to drop out of the race on the 42nd lap. He was 20th at the time. Hunter-Reay said afterward that the initial was an anti-stall mechanism malfunction at the start, but wasn't sure what caused his car to stall later on. “It's heartbreaking,” he said
Advertisement
SPORTS
By Ryan Hunter-Reay | July 21, 2012
[ Editor's note: This is IndyCar driver Ryan Hunter-Reay's second blog for The Baltimore Sun. It was written before he won the pole for Sunday's race in Edmonton. To see his introductory post, click here. ]   Welcome back, everyone. It's been a great run lately, three consecutive wins and going for four this weekend in Edmonton. I think the reason behind it is that our team is reaching its potential, to be honest. Early in the season, we knew we were a threat to win races, but we just didn't quite get it done.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | September 1, 2013
Helio Castroneves began the day at the Grand Prix of Baltimore from the seventh position and finished 75 laps at the 2.04-mile course in ninth place. It was still a successful outing for the 38-year-old native of Sao Paolo, Brazil. With Scott Dixon forced out of the race after a collision with Will Power and Ryan Hunter-Reay suffering a power outage in his car, Castroneves further distanced himself from his top two competitors. Castroneves now leads the IZOD IndyCar Series with 501 points.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | September 1, 2013
Ryan Hunter-Reay, who won the IndyCar Series race in last year's Grand Prix of Baltimore, had a tough time defending his championship Sunday. After starting eighth, Hunter-Reay's DHL Chevrolet had “electronics issues” nearly from the start. His car stalled on the first lap and he dropped down to 22nd. After clawing his way back into the top 10, the same problem resurfaced and Hunter-Reay had to drop out of the race on the 42nd lap. He was 20th at the time. Hunter-Reay said afterward that the initial was an anti-stall mechanism malfunction at the start, but wasn't sure what caused his car to stall later on. “It's heartbreaking,” he said
SPORTS
By Ryan Hunter-Reay | June 16, 2012
Welcome to my first blog for The Baltimore Sun. I'll be writing regularly leading up to the Grand Prix of Baltimore in September, and I'm excited to be able to share my IndyCar experiences with you. First, a quick introduction. I'm Ryan Hunter-Reay, driver of the No. 28 Team DHL/Sun Drop Citrus Soda Andretti Autosport Chevrolet/Dallara. I'm from Fort Lauderdale, Fla., and I'm a down-to-earth guy who grew up dreaming about IndyCar racing. I've idolized the American heroes of open-wheel racing since I was a kid. Guys like Michael Andretti, Rick Mears and Bobby Rahal were my heroes. Now Michael is my team owner, I drove for Bobby for two years, and I see Rick at every race. Racing is my passion in life, and I'm fortunate to be living the American dream.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | August 30, 2013
Ryan Hunter-Reay's racing career might have been summed up in last year's Grand Prix of Baltimore. Starting in the middle of the pack, Hunter-Reay took a number of chances to get into contention and then used a late restart to surge to the front. His victory helped the 31-year old Floridian clinch his first IZOD IndyCar Series championship a week later in California. Reflecting recently on how things unfolded in Baltimore, Hunter-Reay said he had come into the week "being down" after crashing in the previous race in Sonoma when he was hit from behind while running third with three laps to go. "I thought the championship was lost at that point," Hunter-Reay said.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee, The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2012
Ryan Hunter-Reay didn't know what to think or feel after he won Honda Indy Toronto on July 8. It was his third consecutive victory and moved him into the lead of the IZOD IndyCar Series points chase. Will Power, an Australian driver who won the Baltimore Grand Prix last year and finished runner-up in the points standings in 2011, also won three straight races this season. But Hunter-Reay is the first American in six years to achieve that feat, and he has a chance to become the first U.S. champion of the series since Sam Hornish Jr. in 2006.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2013
For as long as Ryan Hunter-Reay can remember, the Indianapolis 500 was a huge deal. As a small child growing up in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., Hunter-Reay used to plop down a plastic race track and line up his miniature race cars in front of the television set on the Sunday morning of Memorial Day weekend. For the next few hours, he was mesmerized. "My dad was a gearhead - he loved cars. I grew up loving cars as well," Hunter-Reay recalled Monday. "He took me to a few races as a fan, and that's where it started.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | September 1, 2013
If there was one driver feeling confident about his chances at Sunday's Grand Prix of Baltimore, it might have been Ryan Hunter-Reay, who won last year's race en route to capturing the IZOD IndyCar Series title. But his bid to become the event's first two-time winner ended shortly after his No. 1 car stopped in the 43rd lap on the course in Turn 10. “We just had an electronic issue that made the car stall on the start,” the 32-year-old Dallas native said. “And then we were ultimately sidelined because of a power outage in the car. The electronics completely failed.” Hunter-Reay said the car hadn't had a severe mechanical problem since the 2011 Honda Grand Prix of St. Petersburg on March 27, which made Sunday's issue just as bewildering.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | September 1, 2013
The big names of IndyCar Series racing keep dropping out of Sunday's Grand Prix of Baltimore. Reigning champion Ryan Hunter-Reay's No. 1 DHL Chevrolet stalled out on the opening lap and after climbing back into contention later on, finally ended his day on the 42nd lap with what he called “electrical issues.” On the 53rd lap, it was pole sitter Scott Dixon's turn. Coming down a straightaway, Dixon's Target Chip Ganassi's No. 9 Honda was forced into the wall when archrival Will Power had maneuvered in front of him, though Power's Team Penske No. 12 Chevrolet brushed the wall and was able to continue.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | September 1, 2013
If there was one driver feeling confident about his chances at Sunday's Grand Prix of Baltimore, it might have been Ryan Hunter-Reay, who won last year's race en route to capturing the IZOD IndyCar Series title. But his bid to become the event's first two-time winner ended shortly after his No. 1 car stopped in the 43rd lap on the course in Turn 10. “We just had an electronic issue that made the car stall on the start,” the 32-year-old Dallas native said. “And then we were ultimately sidelined because of a power outage in the car. The electronics completely failed.” Hunter-Reay said the car hadn't had a severe mechanical problem since the 2011 Honda Grand Prix of St. Petersburg on March 27, which made Sunday's issue just as bewildering.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | September 1, 2013
As the debris cleared and Simon Pagenaud surveyed both the wreckage and the drivers still in contention in Sunday's IZOD IndyCar Series race at the Grand Prix of Baltimore, a simple thought came to the 29-year-old Frenchman. “I knew I was on fresher tires than the guys around me, I knew I had a faster car, but we needed to get going,” Pagenaud said. Aware that many of the circuit's biggest names had either left the 2.04 mile track for good or were well back in the pack - from pole sitter Scott Dixon to defending champion Ryan Hunter-Reay to three-time Indianapolis 500 champ Dario Franchitti to points leader Helio Castroneves to 2011 race winner Will Power - Pagenaud said he “ended up pushing as hard as I could.” Passing reigning Indianapolis 500 champion Tony Kanaan after the next-to-last yellow flag was lifted, and doing the same to Marco Andretti after the final restart, Pagenaud's No. 77 Schmidt Hamilton HP Motorports Honda pushed to the front and held off young American Josef Newgarden and fellow Frenchman Sebastien Bourdais to win the crash-filled 75-lap race by a little more than four seconds.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | August 31, 2013
Robby Gordon was on his way to winning the 1999 Indianapolis 500. His pit crew kept telling him to keep driving, but as Gordon was less than two laps from getting the checkered flag, he encountered a problem to which many can relate whether they're in a $1 million race car or a rusted clunker. Gordon's car ran out of gas. "I want to sit and cry," Gordon said that day. While one of the universal goals of racing is what race team strategists like Target Chip Ganassi's Mike Hull, whose driver, Scott Dixon, won the pole for today's race, call "full to finish" - having just enough gas left in the tank to get to the end - decisions about when to pit and when to pass often makes the difference between winning and losing.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | August 30, 2013
Ryan Hunter-Reay's racing career might have been summed up in last year's Grand Prix of Baltimore. Starting in the middle of the pack, Hunter-Reay took a number of chances to get into contention and then used a late restart to surge to the front. His victory helped the 31-year old Floridian clinch his first IZOD IndyCar Series championship a week later in California. Reflecting recently on how things unfolded in Baltimore, Hunter-Reay said he had come into the week "being down" after crashing in the previous race in Sonoma when he was hit from behind while running third with three laps to go. "I thought the championship was lost at that point," Hunter-Reay said.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2013
There are certain athletes whose popularity transcends long-standing rivalries, petty jealousy and pure ego. When they finally win a major title after years of trying, the celebration seems to be shared not only by their family, friends and fans, but with their fellow competitors as well. It happened when Hakeem Olajuwon won his first NBA title in 1994, when Phil Mickelson won his first Masters in 2004, when Peyton Manning won his first Super Bowl after the 2006 season. There was mostly universal joy after their career-defining victories.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee, The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2012
The Grand Prix of Baltimore was IndyCar points leader Will Power's chance to wrap up his first title on a street course, the kind of race track that is his forte. He couldn't do it. Now he has to go to Fontana, Calif., to a 500-mile race on an oval. The mere thought of it is enough to make Michael Andretti, who owns the car driven by Power's main foe, Ryan Hunter-Reay, just a little bit cocky. "We're going to win this thing," Andretti said as soon as Sunday's Grand Prix was over and his driver, Hunter-Reay, had won the Baltimore race and closed within 17 points of Power.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | September 1, 2013
The big names of IndyCar Series racing keep dropping out of Sunday's Grand Prix of Baltimore. Reigning champion Ryan Hunter-Reay's No. 1 DHL Chevrolet stalled out on the opening lap and after climbing back into contention later on, finally ended his day on the 42nd lap with what he called “electrical issues.” On the 53rd lap, it was pole sitter Scott Dixon's turn. Coming down a straightaway, Dixon's Target Chip Ganassi's No. 9 Honda was forced into the wall when archrival Will Power had maneuvered in front of him, though Power's Team Penske No. 12 Chevrolet brushed the wall and was able to continue.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | July 29, 2013
The downtown streets that double as the course for the Grand Prix of Baltimore have provided IndyCar driver Will Power with bittersweet memories over the first two years of the event. In the race's inaugural running in 2011, Power started on the pole and led for 70 of the 75 laps en route to his sixth victory of the season. "It was not that straightforward; it was one of my best wins that I'll always remember," Power recalled Monday during a publicity tour in Baltimore for next month's race.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2013
If not for a yellow flag with 2 1/2 laps left in this year's Indianapolis 500, Carlos Munoz might have become the youngest champion in one of auto racing's iconic events. Still, what the 21-year-old Colombian accomplished at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway over Memorial Day weekend served notice that his second season on the Indy Lights circuit will likely be his last. Munoz, who was in third place behind Ryan Hunter-Reay and Tony Kanaan when the late yellow flag was dropped, seemed disappointed at the time to finish second behind Kanaan, who won his first Indy 500 in his 12th attempt.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.