Advertisement
HomeCollectionsRwandan
IN THE NEWS

Rwandan

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | November 16, 1994
GOMA, Zaire -- Nearly four months after the world watched as an estimated 50,000 Rwandan refugees collapsed and died in miserable camps here, frustrated United Nations officials and relief workers say the largest, fastest international relief effort in history has become a new kind of nightmare.Life for the tens of thousands of refugees who remain here has acquired other awful dimensions, including the widespread theft of donated food and other relief goods; death threats against U.N. field officers and aid workers; and daily political assassinations and other murders in the three largest camps.
ARTICLES BY DATE
FEATURES
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,SUN STAFF | March 22, 2005
Nathalie Piraino came to St. Matthew Roman Catholic Church in Northeast Baltimore four years ago seeking a permanent place of worship, yet even as the Rwanda-born woman grew more comfortable with parishioners she kept a big part of her life to herself -- that she had lost more than 100 family members to Rwanda's 1994 genocide, including her mother and seven siblings. "This question, `How are you doing?' I would say [to myself], `Do they really mean it?'" says the 48-year-old from Rosedale who left Rwanda for the United States in 1979 after marrying an American official of a relief organization.
Advertisement
NEWS
May 10, 1994
The rush of a quarter-million or more Rwandans across the Kagera River to sanctuary in Tanzania strains the ability of world refugee, health and food organizations to cope. Fortunately, a relief infrastructure of sorts exists there, because of previous migrations from neighboring Burundi. But it is the remotest part of Tanzania, with poor transportation and no facilities for the camps that need to be established until the people can go home.The last refugee wave from Rwanda, a generation ago, fled to Uganda.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | March 19, 2005
How do you tell the story of 800,000 deaths in 100 days without making a movie too horrific to bear? That is the challenge director Raoul Peck faced in making the HBO film Sometimes in April, which chronicles the genocide that took place in Rwanda in 1994 as hard-line members of the Hutu majority slaughtered Tutsis and moderate Hutus. The blood bath lasted more than three months while the world looked on but offered little help. Peck, who scored a triumph with HBO's Lumumba in 2002, masterfully combines a visual style of harsh realism to communicate the horror, with an elegiac tone and poetic sensibility that seeks to redeem it. The result is an epic that stirs the soul with its story of the dignity and suffering of those who survived, even as it staggers the imagination with the catalog of brutality that they witnessed.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | May 11, 1994
PRETORIA, South Africa -- Vice President Al Gore, U.N. Secretary-General Boutros Boutros-Ghali, the head of the Organization of African Unity, South African President Nelson Mandela and other African leaders have met to discuss ways to invigorate stalled international efforts to aid civilians in strife-racked Rwanda.Mr. Mandela, speaking at a brief news conference yesterday after meeting with Mr. Gore, appeared willing to discuss the possibility of an international force to restore order in Rwanda -- a move that African leaders have opposed in the past.
NEWS
August 5, 1994
Interfaith prayers for the people of Rwanda are planned for 4 p.m. Sunday at Milford Mill United Methodist Church, 915 Milford Mill Road.Choirs and soloists from several Christian churches will provide the music for the ecumenical service. Donations will be accepted for medical and nutritional assistance for displaced families in Africa through a Methodist overseas agency.Information: 486-5263.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 2, 1994
NGARA, Tanzania -- Barely two days after a harrowing and exhausting escape from Rwanda, the more than a quarter-million refugees who arrived here were soaked by heavy rains, adding to the miseries of their makeshift lives with little shelter or food.Some had umbrellas to hide under, and a few strung out plastic tarpaulins or thatched together grass huts. But in this wide-open land, most just weathered the downpours with nothing.Barefoot children squatted on the roadside, shivering in oversized torn sweaters.
NEWS
By Reported by Frank P. L. Somerville | April 7, 1995
On the first anniversary of the plane crash in Rwanda that set off genocide in central Africa, leaders of Protestant, Jewish and Roman Catholic agencies renewed their commitments yesterday to collaborating on foreign assistance.Addressing the board of Interfaith Hunger Appeal, an umbrella group meeting at the West Fayette Street headquarters of Catholic Relief Services, Cardinal William H. Keeler said the public responds to calls for help when "we stand together."The African war, which intensified after the plane crash that killed the presidents of Rwanda and neighboring Burundi, has left ethnic hatreds, poverty and the suffering of 2 million refugees largely unabated.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 21, 1994
NAIROBI, Kenya -- Thousands of bodies from Rwanda's massacres have washed down the Kagera River into Lake Victoria in Uganda in the past week, creating an acute health hazard, Ugandan officials say.Cloaking the countryside with the stench of death, the bodies -- as many as 100 an hour -- are being washed ashore in the Rakai district of southern Uganda or onto islands in Lake Victoria and have been seen as far north as Entebbe.A clean-up operation by the Ugandan government and international relief agencies has been hampered by the remoteness of the area, heavy rains and the difficulty of fighting off the wild dogs and other animals feeding on the bodies.
NEWS
By Raymond Bonner and Raymond Bonner,New York Times News Service | November 18, 1994
NYAKIZU, Rwanda -- The lush, green, rolling hills are lifeless. Square, mud-wall houses are abandoned. No one is working in the terraced fields. The only sounds are the slight rustle of leaves and an occasional bird. It is the silence of death.Many of the former inhabitants were Tutsi, slaughtered in April. Other now-empty houses belonged to the Hutu "killers," as one current resident, herself a Hutu, described them, or to the killers' relatives. They have not dared come back.Before the killing began, more than 50,000 people lived in this commune in southern Rwanda, on the border with Burundi.
NEWS
By Robyn Dixon and Robyn Dixon,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 10, 2004
SHYORONGI, Rwanda - Evariste Ahimana can't even utter the word "one" to tell how many people he killed in Rwanda's genocide. He just holds up a finger to represent what he did - clubbing a neighbor named Augustin Murinda, whom he liked and often drank with - at the behest of strangers from the next village. Since returning to this village after his release from prison last year, Ahimana has walked past the house of his victim's brother every week as he climbs the hill to the church. Walking downhill after prayers and confession, he has never stopped to apologize.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 4, 2003
ARUSHA, Tanzania - In the first case of its kind since the Nuremberg war crimes trials after World War II, an international court here convicted three Rwandans yesterday of genocide. The trio used a newspaper and a radio station to incite machete-wielding gangs that slaughtered about 800,000 Rwandans, mostly of the Tutsi minority, over several months in 1994. A three-judge panel said the media executives had used a radio station and a twice-monthly newspaper to mobilize Rwanda's Hutu majority against the Tutsis, who were massacred at churches, schools, hospitals and roadblocks.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | February 20, 2003
NAIROBI, Kenya - A United Nations war crimes tribunal convicted a Rwandan pastor yesterday who fled to Texas and his son of genocide for orchestrating the 1994 slaughter of hundreds of ethnic Tutsis who had sought refuge in the minister's church compound. The Rev. Elizaphan Ntakirutimana, 78, former pastor of a Seventh-day Adventist complex, is the first church leader that the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda has convicted. The judicial body was created in 1994 to try those suspected of ordering extremist ethnic Hutu militias to massacre 800,000 ethnic Tutsis and Hutus who refused to go along with the extremists.
TOPIC
By William Ferroggiaro | April 18, 1999
IN APRIL 1994, a genocide several times more swift than the Nazis' slaughter of the Jews swept through the African nation of Rwanda, claiming nearly 1 million victims -- and the United States and the rest of the world turned a blind eye. Today, the world is witnessing "ethnic cleansing" in Kosovo, where Serbian forces have forcibly ejected an estimated 500,000 mostly Muslim, ethnic Albanians from the nation. Nowhere near 1 million Kosovar Albanians have been killed by the Serbs. Yet the United States and its NATO allies have unleashed missiles and planes on Serbia in the most intensive bombing campaign in Europe since World War II. As we ponder the fifth anniversary of Rwandan genocide, our bombing-for-peace campaign in the Balkans raises troubling questions: How do we pick our fights?
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 26, 1998
KIGALI, Rwanda -- President Clinton came to Kigali yesterday to talk to scarred and mutilated survivors of the 1994 genocide in Rwanda and to acknowledge that the world could have protected them, though it did not."We in the United States and the world community did not do as much as we could have and should have done to try to limit what occurred in Rwanda in 1994," the president told a half-dozen people in Kigali who lost parents, siblings and children during three months of ethnic mass killing that claimed hundreds of thousands of lives.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 14, 1997
ARUSHA, Tanzania -- The wheels of justice move at their own pace in this remote, dusty place, home to the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda, though better known as a tourist ++ layover for safaris to the Serengeti and treks up Kilimanjaro.The tribunal has only one courtroom, so the three trials under way have proceeded intermittently. The phones work only marginally. The hallways in the Arusha International Conference Center, a crumbling concrete behemoth, are dark and, though mopped on occasion, dingy and full of potholes.
NEWS
By Bruce Reid and Bruce Reid,Sun Staff Writer | July 29, 1994
Keith Hutchison, an Army water-purification specialist operating mainly in Third World countries, is hardened to scenes of disease and death. But, he confessed, nothing can prepare him for what he expects to face soon in packed Rwandan refugee camps in Zaire.On Sunday, just days after he returned from a 10-day mission in South Korea, a call came to his home in Panama asking him to prepare for a six-month stint helping to overcome sickness and death brought on by civil war in Rwanda.By 2 a.m. yesterday, he had arrived at Aberdeen Proving Ground northeast of Baltimore, which this week began preparing Army support personnel to aid in the growing relief effort.
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Sun Staff Writer | May 26, 1994
Nathalie Piraino, a Rwandan-born dressmaker, fears that nearly all her family in that Central African country has been slaughtered. But the Carney resident has found some comfort amid unimaginable despair knowing that one 4-year-old niece did survive.Vanessa Uwineza, the daughter of Mrs. Piraino's older sister, was spirited from Rwanda unharmed while other members of the Tutsi minority were hunted down by marauding gangs. Vanessa's little French-speaking voice over the past several weeks has been a telephone lifeline of hope to Mrs. Piraino's home.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 23, 1997
ABIDJAN, Ivory Coast -- With evacuation efforts paralyzed for thousands of sick and starving Rwandan Hutu refugees stranded in central Zaire, United Nations officials are accusing Zaire's rebel movement of deliberately impeding emergency relief operations aimed at helping them.International relief agencies say there is evidence of a drive by the Zairian insurgents to kill off thousands of Rwandan Hutu refugees.In an unusually blunt criticism Monday, the head of the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees, Sadako Ogata, accused the Zairian rebellion led by Laurent Kabila of manufacturing pretenses to deny relief workers access to as many as 100,000 of the desperate Hutus who are located in the region of Kisangani and of preventing the operation of an airlift to transport them home.
NEWS
April 16, 1997
THE ASPECT of the Zairian civil war crying out for international intervention is the plight of Hutu refugees, herded by former soldiers toward death by starvation and disease. Laurent Kabila, who seems certain to take over Zaire in the near future, will then want international aid, respect and cooperation. He should be judged on how well he facilitates aid agencies in finding and rescuing these refugees.Of some 100,000 surviving Hutu refugees who fled the Tingi-Tingi camp in March, some two-thirds have been spotted moving toward the Central African Republic to the north.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.