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NEWS
April 28, 2011
To live in Ruxton you're certified sane It's one of the neighborhoods' perks. Behaviors that elsewhere would put you away, Well, here, they're just little quirks. 'Cause the streets are clean and the air is as pure As the minds of all of the neighbors. If you act sort of weird, it's called normal here Even though you're convinced you're Jim Nabors. Peg McAllen, Towson
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 24, 2014
The recent article regarding the Federal Hill stabbing and the neighborhood's complaints of a dearth of information regarding the incident should have mentioned The Sun as part of the problem ( "Neighbors question lack of information after stabbing in Federal Hill," Aug. 19). If this had been a bunch of white thugs beating up a black kid in Ruxton, this would have been in Monday's paper with a completely different tenor - like outrage and call for social justice - and we would have had the race industry folks (the Revs.
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NEWS
April 27, 2011
Your editorial regarding Sheppard Pratt's planned rehab facility in Ruxton is off-base in many ways but two points especially should be made clear ("Discrimination in Ruxton," April 25): First, the main issue surrounding the proposed facility is money, not discrimination against the mentally ill by "wealthy" individuals. If you drive down the block of the proposed site, the neighbors do not appear as affluent as The Sun would have you believe. No one wants any sort of facility next to their house that will significantly decrease their home's value.
CLASSIFIED
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2014
When Evelyn Gorman bought her then-10-year-old contemporary brick townhouse in Ruxton 25 years ago, change was the first order of business. To this seasoned interior designer from New York City, there was no reason not to create everything in her style - one she calls "country French in an eclectic, sophisticated approach. " The obvious starting point was getting rid of the 1980s kitchen that was prominently avocado green. "I have always tried to be true to my own design concepts," said the award-winning designer and former interior design columnist for the Baltimore Jewish Times.
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard, Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 4, 2011
Back in 1967, Dick Watts, a widower with two young sons, was renting the carriage house on the large estate of Philip Poe, a descendant cousin of Edgar Allan Poe. He was comfortable living down the hill from the manor house, which backs up to Roland Run in Ruxton. "He used to walk along the property, and one day he said to me, 'This is where you want to raise your boys,'" remembers Dick Watts, 82, who at the time was a coach and director of the athletic department at UMBC. "He said it would be $30,000 to buy it and he took $150 down and financed the rest at 5 percent!"
NEWS
April 28, 2011
In the midst of the fracas over whether Shepherd Pratt can run a home for psychiatric patients ("Discrimination in Ruxton," April 25), isn't everyone forgetting Ruxton's intransigence when a light rail stop was proposed 20 years ago? Not only does the light rail conveniently bestride the Ruxton commercial district, but trains stopped there for many years when there were few if any black passengers on them. But although the MTA more or less begged Ruxton to acquiesce to a light rail stop, the community refused to have any access via the light rail.
NEWS
April 22, 2011
It will be interesting to watch how the issue of a group home for wealthy mental health patients in Ruxton gets handled ("Ruxton residents oppose rehabilitation house in area," April 21). The issue of group homes has been a Gordian Knot for over 25 years. It pits the legislatively and constitutionally supported right to fair and equal housing against a neighborhood's concern over the makeup of its residents. Neighborhoods in Randallstown and Woodlawn have considerable experience with this, but it will now be intriguing to see how a place like Ruxton, it's elected officials and the media confront this dilemma.
NEWS
April 30, 2011
The situation in Ruxton is full of complexities ("Discrimination in Ruxton," April 25). If representatives of Sheppard Pratt Health System are to be believed, Ruxton residents are a bunch of elitist snobs with no moral standing. In reality, the personal issues surrounding this are just the beginning. Put aside the obvious name-calling and look at the more important legal issues. The heart of this issue lies around the misguided actions of Sheppard Pratt. Without question, Sheppard Pratt is a first-rate institution with exceptional staff and services.
NEWS
May 10, 2011
After reading yet one more letter accusing the residents of Ruxton of prejudice, bigotry and outright snobbery, I am compelled to inject a little reality into the "soup" of emotion-based rhetoric. The proposed "retreat" on Labelle Avenue in Ruxton by Sheppard Pratt Health Systems is a commercial enterprise, and a very lucrative one at that. Nothing more. Furthermore, the CEO of Sheppard Pratt Health Systems, Dr. Steven S. Sharfstein, couldn't possibly have anticipated anything but "approval" of this venture, since the decision lies in the hands of the secretary of the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene who happens to be Dr. Joshua M. Sharfstein, his son. Let the readers draw their own conclusions.
NEWS
April 25, 2011
The Sun once again pulls out all the stops from its lofty editorial perch to totally mischaracterize issues with Sheppard Pratt locating a half-way house in Ruxton ( "Discrimination in Ruxton," April 25). In the process, it also fails to address the very essence of the story. Shame on Sheppard Pratt for the way the half-way house plan was presented to the community. They claim to be part of the community, but they came in without prior dialogue with the community and told us that the deal is fait accompli, irrespective of the community's feelings.
FEATURES
By Liz Atwood, For The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2014
Creating a beautiful garden isn't a matter of luck. The winners of this year's Baltimore Sun garden contest prove it takes knowledge, artistry - and a strong back. These gardeners hoisted paving stones, moved heavy pots and cut logs from fallen trees in their quest to create beautiful spaces where they could relax, reflect and spend time with friends. Best Overall: John and Maureen Lalley, Ruxton John Lalley's children surprised him with an unusual Father's Day gift: They nominated his and his wife's garden for The Baltimore Sun's garden contest.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 8, 2014
Betty J. "BJ" Lewenz, a former art teacher, photographer, poet and naturalist, died May 23 of heart failure at Union Memorial Hospital. The longtime Ruxton resident was 91. The daughter of Ralph Curtis Deatrick and Amy Carol Henderson Deatrick, Betty Jane Deatrick was born and raised in Gettysburg, Pa. Starting in her midteens, Mrs. Lewenz, who was known throughout her life as "BJ," worked as a copy editor, illustrator and photographer for...
NEWS
By Barbara Pash | May 7, 2014
On Tuesday, the sky a clear blue, the temperature in the 70s with just the right bit of breeze, the beautiful day served as the backdrop for a heartwarming event at St. Paul's School for Girls in Lutherville. For the ninth year in a row, the private school hosted League of Dreams Day during which St. Paul's girls play a baseball game with students from Ridge Ruxton School, a Baltimore County public school in Towson for special needs young people, ages 3 to 21. "Our school is committed to being a partner with the Baltimore disabled community," said LuAnn Blackman, St. Paul's 11th-grade dean, a math teacher and moderator of the St. Paul's Club for Students for Disability Awareness, which organized the event.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | April 16, 2014
Marjorie B. "Midge" Price, a homemaker and singer who had been a professional photographer, died April 8 of Alzheimer's disease at Blakehurst Retirement Community in Towson. She was 84. The daughter of Donald Swann "Ducky" Beard, an insurance executive, and Marjorie Balderston Beard Cornell, a homemaker, Marjorie Beard was born and raised in Philadelphia. After graduating in 1948 from the Stevens School in Germantown, Pa., she enrolled at the Yawn School of Photography Inc. in Philadelphia.
NEWS
By Kit Waskom Pollard and For The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2014
The concept behind the new Ruxton gallery and shop, V Fashion Towson/My Town Art Gallery, was born in the most unlikely of places: years ago, on the sidelines of a club lacrosse game. Watching her now-grown daughters play lacrosse, Valerie Heneberry was struck by a desire to celebrate her fun, active lifestyle. She knew her husband, artist Patrick Reid O'Brien, was up for the job -- and that she could help. O'Brien draws on his art education and a career in advertising to create Pop Art-inspired prints that celebrate that good life.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 24, 2014
The Rev. William W. Trumbore, a retired Episcopal minister who enjoyed working with young people, died Monday of complications from Parkinson's disease at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. He was 81. The son of Clarke Trumbore, an Episcopal minister, and Marion Trumbore, an educator, William Wilson Trumbore was born in Fitchburg, Mass., and raised in Carbondale, Pa. After graduating in 1950 from Central High School in Scranton, Pa., Mr. Trumbore earned a bachelor's degree in 1954 from Lehigh University, where he was a member of Phi Beta Kappa.
NEWS
By Tom Costello and Marion Knott | April 30, 2011
Sheppard Pratt's recent surprise announcement to put what the hospital calls an "opulent" treatment center for "affluent" individuals with substance abuse and mental health concerns in a dense lane of modest homes in Ruxton has been a disaster. Sheppard Pratt's "outreach" has failed completely to match the sense of community that the giant hospital has received from its neighbors over the last several decades. It is impossible to greet the news of the hospital's "Retreat Center" expansion into our residential neighborhood as anything but shocking.
NEWS
May 9, 2011
This former resident of Ruxton is not amused at the ugly show of prejudicial stigma against the mentally ill by it current residents. When the light rail was proposed to have a station in Ruxton, the same sort of bigotry was trotted out against the "blacks in the city. " There are plenty of unsound minds and substance abuse in Ruxton; I know I lived there for years. The hue and cry now emanating from Ruxton that a few more folks with unsound minds and a bit of substance abuse issues might be joining the neighborhood is a logical absurdity.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | December 18, 2013
Curran W. "Cub" Harvey Jr., former president of T. Rowe Price Associates Inc. who later was a partner in New Enterprise Associates, a Baltimore venture capital firm, died Sunday of pneumonia at Naples Community Hospital in Naples, Fla. He was 84. "Cub was known as a crack analyst and was someone who loved studying emerging companies. That's how he was known through the years," said James A.C. Kennedy, CEO and president of T. Rowe Price Associates Inc., who began working with Mr. Harvey in 1978.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | November 29, 2013
Dolores B. Scott, a retired educator and librarian who taught in Baltimore public schools for three decades and was a world traveler, died Nov. 19 of Alzheimer's disease at Chaparral Winds Hospice in Sun City West, Ariz. The longtime Randallstown resident was 86. The daughter of Howard Brown, a hotel headwaiter, and Eva Brown, a homemaker, Dolores Brown was born in Baltimore and raised in the 2300 block of McCulloh St. in the city's Sugar Hill neighborhood. Mrs. Scott graduated with honors in 1945 from Frederick Douglass High School and was second in her class at what is now Coppin State University, where she earned her bachelor's degree in 1949.
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