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Ruthann Aron

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By Judy Oppenheimer | June 22, 1997
One tough cookie.That's how Ruthann Aron struck a lot of people. I know that's how she struck me, when I interviewed her a few years back for the Baltimore Jewish Times.Superficially, we resembled each other a great deal -- both of us Jewish, longtime Montgomery County residents, both of us mothers of two grown children. In truth, we were miles apart -- she was married to a doctor, had made a few millions in land development. Launching her campaign for the Republican U.S. Senate nomination, she espoused what I could only think of as knee-jerk conservatism.
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NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,SUN STAFF | October 18, 2000
Ruthann Aron, the former U.S. Senate candidate who pleaded no contest to hiring a hit man in 1997 to kill her physician husband, was released from home detention yesterday, according to Montgomery County jail officials. The 57-year-old Potomac resident -- who was also charged with solicitation to commit murder against attorney Alfred Kahn -- had been on home detention since June, with an electronic monitoring device and various reporting requirements. Aron, who could not be reached for comment last night, pleaded no contest in a July 1998 trial that followed an earlier mistrial.
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FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | June 13, 1997
Maybe it was the assault rifle with laser sight and flash suppressor that gave it away. Or the books police say they found in Ruthann Aron's car -- "How to Make a Disposable Silencer." The topper could have been the wig, floppy hat, and trench coat allegedly found in the Montgomery County politician's car.Get real. Trench coats went out with Dashiell Hammett and Columbo.Thus, Aron, a former U.S. Senate candidate, is being held without bond after being charged with trying to hire a hit man to kill her husband and a Baltimore man.A recurring and featured crime in Maryland, contract killings are notable mainly for not working.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | November 9, 1999
ROCKVILLE -- A Montgomery County circuit judge refused yesterday to shorten the jail sentence of former U.S. Senate candidate Ruthann Aron, despite her teary plea for forgiveness.During a three-hour hearing, Aron's lawyers sought to have her moved to a halfway house now rather than in April, saying her mental state is deteriorating.At the end of the hearing, Aron rose to plead her case."I don't know what I could say to the court. I don't know what anyone could say for me," she said in a soft, flat voice.
FEATURES
By PATRICIA MEISOL and PATRICIA MEISOL,SUN STAFF | February 25, 1998
Two facets of Ruthann Aron are reflected in photos: The poised, commanding leader on the campaign trail. The vulnerable, lost soul at her arrest last June on murder-for-hire charges.These days, a chance meeting with a reporter in her attorney's office in Rockville embarrasses the once-prominent politician. She is self-conscious about her faded shirt, dark pants and bomber jacket, puffs of hair askew. Seated at a glass table, she has come here with regularity in recent weeks, using her skills as a lawyer to help prepare her defense.
NEWS
By Debbie M. Price and Thomas W. Waldron and Debbie M. Price and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer William F. Zorzi Jr. and researcher Andrea Wilson contributed to this article | June 15, 1997
The government says it has your client on tape, soliciting two murders for hire. They find an assault weapon in her bedroom and the makings of a silencer in her car. They watch her leave $500 in an envelope at a hotel desk. She is wearing a disguise.With this set of accusations, what are Ruthann Aron's lawyers to do?Legal experts say the circumstances of Aron's attempted murder-for-hire case make the obvious avenues of defense -- insanity and entrapment -- challenging, at best.But Aron, a former U.S. Senate candidate, has one important advantage -- money.
NEWS
May 16, 1998
Ruthann Aron has fired her defense team less than a month after one of the attorneys urged her to plead guilty on charges she tried to arrange the deaths of her husband and a Baltimore lawyer.Attorneys Barry Helfand, Judith Catterton and Erik Bolog were Aron's attorneys when a deadlocked jury led to a mistrial in PTC March. Afterward, Helfand recommended that she plead guilty and seek the court's mercy rather than face a retrial scheduled for July 6.In their place, Aron has hired former Howard County prosecutor Teresa Whalen.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | August 6, 1997
The Montgomery County Council yesterday removed from the planning board Ruthann Aron, who has been charged with hiring a hit man to kill her husband and a Baltimore lawyer.Council Vice President Isiah Leggett called the unanimous vote to take away Aron's $18,500-a-year job "difficult and sad." But the council said it had no alternative for keeping the five-member planning board at full strength while Aron is in jail awaiting trial. Lawyers for Aron, a Potomac developer and 1994 Republican candidate for U.S. Senate, said last week that it would be unconstitutional to remove her while she is unable to defend herself.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,Sun Staff Writer | April 14, 1995
Ruthann Aron, the Montgomery County developer who ran a combative campaign for U.S. Senate last year, is considering a run for the congressional seat held by Rep. Constance A. Morella, a fellow Republican.Ms. Aron said yesterday that she has been approached by Republicans who were displeased with Mrs. Morella's votes against portions of their party's "Contract with America."Those Republicans, whom she declined to name, urged her to challenge Mrs. Morella in the GOP primary next year, Ms. Aron said.
NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 11, 1997
SOUTH FALLSBURG, N.Y. -- Most people in this Catskills hamlet know little of Ruthann Aron's career as a Montgomery County developer and politician.But they do wonder about her relationship with her father, who was murdered three years ago.David Greenzweig, father of the woman who was arrested this week in Rockville on charges that she tried to hire a hit man to kill her husband and a Baltimore lawyer, was a pillar of this community. For years he owned the Fallsburg Diner. After the diner burned down, he was chief steward at the Raleigh, a prominent Borscht Belt hotel.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | July 31, 1998
In a move that caught even her lawyers off guard, Ruthann Aron cut short her murder-for-hire retrial yesterday and pleaded no contest to charges that she had put out a contract to have her husband and another man killed.Aron's decision came at the last minute, just as jurors were preparing to hear closing arguments and begin deliberating.As opposed to pleading guilty, the "nolo contendere" plea leaves her record technically free of convictions or any admission of guilt.Montgomery County Circuit Judge Vincent Ferretti Jr. immediately revoked Aron's $25,000 bond, and returned the prominent Potomac developer and one-time U.S. Senate candidate to jail to await sentencing.
NEWS
May 16, 1998
Ruthann Aron has fired her defense team less than a month after one of the attorneys urged her to plead guilty on charges she tried to arrange the deaths of her husband and a Baltimore lawyer.Attorneys Barry Helfand, Judith Catterton and Erik Bolog were Aron's attorneys when a deadlocked jury led to a mistrial in PTC March. Afterward, Helfand recommended that she plead guilty and seek the court's mercy rather than face a retrial scheduled for July 6.In their place, Aron has hired former Howard County prosecutor Teresa Whalen.
FEATURES
By PATRICIA MEISOL and PATRICIA MEISOL,SUN STAFF | February 25, 1998
Two facets of Ruthann Aron are reflected in photos: The poised, commanding leader on the campaign trail. The vulnerable, lost soul at her arrest last June on murder-for-hire charges.These days, a chance meeting with a reporter in her attorney's office in Rockville embarrasses the once-prominent politician. She is self-conscious about her faded shirt, dark pants and bomber jacket, puffs of hair askew. Seated at a glass table, she has come here with regularity in recent weeks, using her skills as a lawyer to help prepare her defense.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | August 6, 1997
The Montgomery County Council yesterday removed from the planning board Ruthann Aron, who has been charged with hiring a hit man to kill her husband and a Baltimore lawyer.Council Vice President Isiah Leggett called the unanimous vote to take away Aron's $18,500-a-year job "difficult and sad." But the council said it had no alternative for keeping the five-member planning board at full strength while Aron is in jail awaiting trial. Lawyers for Aron, a Potomac developer and 1994 Republican candidate for U.S. Senate, said last week that it would be unconstitutional to remove her while she is unable to defend herself.
NEWS
By Judy Oppenheimer | June 22, 1997
One tough cookie.That's how Ruthann Aron struck a lot of people. I know that's how she struck me, when I interviewed her a few years back for the Baltimore Jewish Times.Superficially, we resembled each other a great deal -- both of us Jewish, longtime Montgomery County residents, both of us mothers of two grown children. In truth, we were miles apart -- she was married to a doctor, had made a few millions in land development. Launching her campaign for the Republican U.S. Senate nomination, she espoused what I could only think of as knee-jerk conservatism.
NEWS
By Debbie M. Price and Debbie M. Price,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer William F. Zorzi Jr. contributed to this article | June 18, 1997
After more than four years of an estranged marriage, sharing the same Potomac home but living separate lives, Barry Aron broached the question with his wife a few months ago. He wanted a divorce.Ruthann Aron said yes, with one condition. She would give her husband of 32 years a divorce, provided he stayed with her through her planned run for the Montgomery County Council next year. Barry Aron agreed.And then, in a bizarre story that has become all too familiar to Barry Aron, a Montgomery County police officer arrived at his office last week with the news: Ruthann Aron -- former U.S. Senate candidate, lawyer, developer, microbiologist and mother of two -- had been arrested on suspicion of trying to hire a hit man to kill him.Speaking for the first time since his wife's arrest, Barry Aron, a prominent Montgomery County urologist and transplant physician, provided a candid account yesterday of their life together and offered a glimpse of a possible motive for her actions.
NEWS
By Debbie M. Price and Debbie M. Price,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer William F. Zorzi Jr. contributed to this article | June 18, 1997
After more than four years of an estranged marriage, sharing the same Potomac home but living separate lives, Barry Aron broached the question with his wife a few months ago. He wanted a divorce.Ruthann Aron said yes, with one condition. She would give her husband of 32 years a divorce, provided he stayed with her through her planned run for the Montgomery County Council next year. Barry Aron agreed.And then, in a bizarre story that has become all too familiar to Barry Aron, a Montgomery County police officer arrived at his office last week with the news: Ruthann Aron -- former U.S. Senate candidate, lawyer, developer, microbiologist and mother of two -- had been arrested on suspicion of trying to hire a hit man to kill him.Speaking for the first time since his wife's arrest, Barry Aron, a prominent Montgomery County urologist and transplant physician, provided a candid account yesterday of their life together and offered a glimpse of a possible motive for her actions.
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,SUN STAFF | October 18, 2000
Ruthann Aron, the former U.S. Senate candidate who pleaded no contest to hiring a hit man in 1997 to kill her physician husband, was released from home detention yesterday, according to Montgomery County jail officials. The 57-year-old Potomac resident -- who was also charged with solicitation to commit murder against attorney Alfred Kahn -- had been on home detention since June, with an electronic monitoring device and various reporting requirements. Aron, who could not be reached for comment last night, pleaded no contest in a July 1998 trial that followed an earlier mistrial.
NEWS
By Debbie M. Price and Thomas W. Waldron and Debbie M. Price and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer William F. Zorzi Jr. and researcher Andrea Wilson contributed to this article | June 15, 1997
The government says it has your client on tape, soliciting two murders for hire. They find an assault weapon in her bedroom and the makings of a silencer in her car. They watch her leave $500 in an envelope at a hotel desk. She is wearing a disguise.With this set of accusations, what are Ruthann Aron's lawyers to do?Legal experts say the circumstances of Aron's attempted murder-for-hire case make the obvious avenues of defense -- insanity and entrapment -- challenging, at best.But Aron, a former U.S. Senate candidate, has one important advantage -- money.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | June 13, 1997
Maybe it was the assault rifle with laser sight and flash suppressor that gave it away. Or the books police say they found in Ruthann Aron's car -- "How to Make a Disposable Silencer." The topper could have been the wig, floppy hat, and trench coat allegedly found in the Montgomery County politician's car.Get real. Trench coats went out with Dashiell Hammett and Columbo.Thus, Aron, a former U.S. Senate candidate, is being held without bond after being charged with trying to hire a hit man to kill her husband and a Baltimore man.A recurring and featured crime in Maryland, contract killings are notable mainly for not working.
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