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By Jonathan Kirsch and Jonathan Kirsch,Tribune Newspapers | May 3, 2009
Ruth Reichl is a commanding and daunting figure in American culture. Beginning in the 1970s, she played a key role in revolutionizing food and restaurant journalism, wielded make-or-break influence as a restaurant critic for the Los Angeles Times and later The New York Times, and continues to loom large as editor in chief of Gourmet magazine. With her fourth book, Not Becoming My Mother: And Other Things She Taught Me Along the Way, however, Reichl looks backward and inward in an attempt to understand and explain her mother, both to herself and to us. At barely 100 pages, Not Becoming My Mother is a meditation rather than a memoir but is no less affecting for its brevity.
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By Jonathan Kirsch and Jonathan Kirsch,Tribune Newspapers | May 3, 2009
Ruth Reichl is a commanding and daunting figure in American culture. Beginning in the 1970s, she played a key role in revolutionizing food and restaurant journalism, wielded make-or-break influence as a restaurant critic for the Los Angeles Times and later The New York Times, and continues to loom large as editor in chief of Gourmet magazine. With her fourth book, Not Becoming My Mother: And Other Things She Taught Me Along the Way, however, Reichl looks backward and inward in an attempt to understand and explain her mother, both to herself and to us. At barely 100 pages, Not Becoming My Mother is a meditation rather than a memoir but is no less affecting for its brevity.
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By STEPHEN G. HENDERSON and STEPHEN G. HENDERSON,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 4, 2006
Tiptoeing on eggshells, are you? In these dieting days of early January, total victory over vice still seems possible, but you're already wary of the R-word. (Hint: It rhymes with dissolution.) I won't eat this. ... I won't drink that. Fine. Flagellate away. But while you're at it, remember: You can resolve to eat differently, not only less. It's possible to add, not just subtract. With this in mind, here are a few tasty tips from chefs, culinary experts and other gourmands about foods that are brand-new, newly popular or that you'll be hearing more about in 2006.
NEWS
By STEPHEN G. HENDERSON and STEPHEN G. HENDERSON,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 4, 2006
Tiptoeing on eggshells, are you? In these dieting days of early January, total victory over vice still seems possible, but you're already wary of the R-word. (Hint: It rhymes with dissolution.) I won't eat this. ... I won't drink that. Fine. Flagellate away. But while you're at it, remember: You can resolve to eat differently, not only less. It's possible to add, not just subtract. With this in mind, here are a few tasty tips from chefs, culinary experts and other gourmands about foods that are brand-new, newly popular or that you'll be hearing more about in 2006.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin | February 13, 2008
gourmet.com Gourmet magazine has migrated from epicurious.com to its own beautiful new Web site. You can find the magazine's features and recipes, watch episodes of its show, Diary of a Foodie, and sign up for a weekly newsletter from editor Ruth Reichl.
NEWS
By KATE SHATZKIN and KATE SHATZKIN,SUN REPORTER | April 12, 2006
The Gourmet Cookbook calls crown roast of lamb "so sophisticated and fancy that it has come to be virtually synonymous with luxurious eating." The 2004 cookbook, edited by Ruth Reichl, also calls the crown roast something more surprising: "easy." HOW TO A step-by-step guide to butchering and preparing a crown rack of lamb. pg 5F
FEATURES
September 13, 1992
SAN FRANCISCO -- Rob Kasper, Baltimore Sun columnist, has won second place in a national writing contest sponsored by the Newspaper Food Editors and Writers Association. He received the award and a check for $250 this week during the group's convention in San Francisco.The competition, which rates writers on skill and consistency, requires contestants to submit consecutive columns. Mr. Kasper's winning selection came from his twice-weekly Happy Eater column. His columns, on the thrill of grilling eggplant and on the social superiority of the kitchen table over new-fangledbreakfast bars, finished second to Ruth Reichl.
FEATURES
By Liz Atwood | April 4, 2001
Making matzo The start of Passover on Saturday means lots of matzo. The Columbia Jewish Congregation is selling the classic cookbook "Matza 101" by Jenny Kdoshim and Debbie Blevans. It features more than 100 matzo recipes. To get a copy, send a check or money order for $18.95 to the Columbia Jewish Congregation, 5885 Robert Oliver Place, Columbia, MD 21045. Kitchen of the past Ever fantasize about cooking over an open hearth? The Riversdale House Museum in Prince George's County could make your fantasy come true.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Staff | April 24, 2005
Garlic and Sapphires: The Secret Life of a Critic in Disguise By Ruth Reichl. Penguin Press. 328 pages. $24.95. It was 1993. Many of us who didn't live in New York still remember Ruth Reichl's first review for the New York Times. Her critique of Le Cirque, an important restaurant that had gotten four stars from her predecessor, was unexpected and clever; and you knew in your bones it was dead on. First the new critic described how she was ignored and mistreated when she was in disguise eating with another woman, then how she was fawned over after several visits when management finally recognized her. "The King of Spain is waiting in the bar, but your table is ready," the owner gushed as he showed her and her companion to a comfortable table for four.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN STAFF | February 18, 2004
In hailing Rocco DiSpirito as "America's Most Exciting Young Chef," Gourmet magazine editor Ruth Reichl commented that Rocco thinks "of food in ways no one else does." A glance at DiSpirito's cookbook, Flavor (Hyperion, 2003, $35), supports that description. Here is a chef who combines unexpected flavors: calamari with pumpkin seeds and a butternut squash, chicken coated with miso and marmalade, panna cotta with caramel popcorn. Rice pudding is elevated to a white-chocolate risotto. Nutella is turned into a gourmet dessert.
FEATURES
By LIZ SMITH and LIZ SMITH,Tribune Media Services | February 19, 2008
SCIENTIFIC EXPERTS from around the world are genuinely predicting that five years from now, all life on Earth could well finish. Some say it'll be humans that set it off. Others believe a natural phenomenon will be the cause. And religious folks say God himself will press the stop button!" So go the postings of Community Forums on the Web. If you want to read this kind of stuff, just type in "2012" or "end of days." It gets pretty scary and deep. There's the Mayan Calendar that sets Dec. 21, 2012, as the end of the world.
NEWS
By LIZ ATWOOD and LIZ ATWOOD,SUN STAFF | March 19, 2003
Fast and flavorful Working moms and dads who struggle to put a hot meal on the table each night can find new help in their grocery meat case - Kraft's Fresh Prep dinner kits. Kraft's version of the dinner helper comes with refrigerated no-boil pastas, sauces and, of course, cheese. The cook adds chicken or ground beef and dinner is on the table in 30 minutes or less. The kits come in six varieties: Classic Italian Lasagna, Fiesta Taco Dinner Bake, Three Cheese Chicken Enchiladas, Mexican Style Lasagna, Four Cheese Chicken Alfredo and Chicken Parmesan With Linguine.
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