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Ruth Bader Ginsburg

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NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | April 2, 2012
Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburglikes the Indian Healthcare Improvement Act and other ingredients of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, aka "Obamacare. " Why, she asked toward the end of three days of hearings, shouldn't the court keep the good stuff in Obamacare and just dump the unconstitutional bits? The court, she explained, is presented with "a choice between a wrecking operation ... or a salvage job. And the more conservative approach would be salvage rather than throwing out everything.
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NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | April 2, 2012
Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburglikes the Indian Healthcare Improvement Act and other ingredients of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, aka "Obamacare. " Why, she asked toward the end of three days of hearings, shouldn't the court keep the good stuff in Obamacare and just dump the unconstitutional bits? The court, she explained, is presented with "a choice between a wrecking operation ... or a salvage job. And the more conservative approach would be salvage rather than throwing out everything.
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FEATURES
August 10, 2002
1846: Congress chartered the Smithsonian Institution, named for James Smithson, whose $500,000 bequest made it possible. 1977: David Berkowitz was arrested in Yonkers, N.Y., and accused of being "Son of Sam," the gunman responsible for killing six people and wounding seven. 1993: Ruth Bader Ginsburg was sworn in as the second female justice on the U.S. Supreme Court. Associated Press
NEWS
By Robert Barnes and Robert Barnes,The Washington Post | April 13, 2009
COLUMBUS, Ohio -The symposium on Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg's life on and before the Supreme Court had all the trappings of a grand finale: laudatory tributes, scholarly evaluations of her jurisprudence, a running theme about her love of opera and her unfulfilled desire to be a great diva. Absent was any mention of an exit from the stage. If anything, Ginsburg's appearance at Ohio State University's Moritz College of Law - and at a host of other events since the 76-year-old justice had surgery in February to remove a cancerous pancreatic tumor - seemed intended to send a contrary message.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 19, 2004
WASHINGTON - Thirteen Republican members of Congress have asked Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg to withdraw from all future cases having to do with abortion because of her affiliation with the NOW Legal Defense and Education Fund. The House lawmakers said in a letter to the liberal justice yesterday that they were concerned about her lending her name and presence to the Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Distinguished Lecture Series, co-sponsored by the defense fund, because the fund often files legal briefs in cases before the Supreme Court.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | June 29, 2007
BOSTON -- Now, in the season of her discontent, it is well to remember that Ruth Bader Ginsburg was always called a moderate. In fact, when she was nominated to be the second woman on the Supreme Court, there were feminists who added another modifier: too moderate. I always thought that was a bad rap. Justice Ginsburg went to law school when textbooks still read: "Land, like woman, was meant to be possessed." Her dean asked the nine women in her class of 500 why they were taking a man's seat.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 8, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Dividing 5-4, the Supreme Court yesterday gave governments at all levels the authority to give out information from official files selectively, allowing groups to get the data only if they will use it in ways that officials approve.In the first significant ruling of the court's term, the justices split in reinstating a California law that permits police to release records of suspects' arrests, but only to groups that promise not to use the data for commercial purposes.The court in the past has ruled that the Constitution imposes no duty on the government to make public anything that is in official files.
NEWS
May 12, 1998
The Miami Herald said in an editorial Sunday:WHEN the U.S. Supreme Court splits five ways from Sunday on a matter that even has justices in the majority disagreeing among themselves, Congress ought to revisit the troublesome law at issue.Recently, the court upheld a law that makes distinctions between fathers and mothers when determining the citizenship of their children. The law was written in 1940 and amended in 1986. It provides that children born abroad and out of wedlock are deemed Americans if their mothers are. But if a child is born to a non-American mother, his or her American father must acknowledge parenthood before the child reaches 18 years of age.The case before the court involved a young woman, Lorelyn Miller, born in the Philippines in 1970.
NEWS
By Robert Barnes and Robert Barnes,The Washington Post | April 13, 2009
COLUMBUS, Ohio -The symposium on Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg's life on and before the Supreme Court had all the trappings of a grand finale: laudatory tributes, scholarly evaluations of her jurisprudence, a running theme about her love of opera and her unfulfilled desire to be a great diva. Absent was any mention of an exit from the stage. If anything, Ginsburg's appearance at Ohio State University's Moritz College of Law - and at a host of other events since the 76-year-old justice had surgery in February to remove a cancerous pancreatic tumor - seemed intended to send a contrary message.
NEWS
July 24, 1993
Supreme Court nominee Ruth Bader Ginsburg was as vague as possible in answering pointed questions in her confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee. Some members of the committee chided her. But her refusal to hint how she might vote in particular cases was as traditional as some of the senators' attempts at entrapment.Judge Ginsburg explained what the senators already knew: Without reading the briefs, listening to the oral arguments, researching precedents, conferring with colleagues, a justice cannot -- or at least should not -- have an opinion on a case.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | June 29, 2007
BOSTON -- Now, in the season of her discontent, it is well to remember that Ruth Bader Ginsburg was always called a moderate. In fact, when she was nominated to be the second woman on the Supreme Court, there were feminists who added another modifier: too moderate. I always thought that was a bad rap. Justice Ginsburg went to law school when textbooks still read: "Land, like woman, was meant to be possessed." Her dean asked the nine women in her class of 500 why they were taking a man's seat.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 19, 2004
WASHINGTON - Thirteen Republican members of Congress have asked Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg to withdraw from all future cases having to do with abortion because of her affiliation with the NOW Legal Defense and Education Fund. The House lawmakers said in a letter to the liberal justice yesterday that they were concerned about her lending her name and presence to the Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Distinguished Lecture Series, co-sponsored by the defense fund, because the fund often files legal briefs in cases before the Supreme Court.
FEATURES
August 10, 2002
1846: Congress chartered the Smithsonian Institution, named for James Smithson, whose $500,000 bequest made it possible. 1977: David Berkowitz was arrested in Yonkers, N.Y., and accused of being "Son of Sam," the gunman responsible for killing six people and wounding seven. 1993: Ruth Bader Ginsburg was sworn in as the second female justice on the U.S. Supreme Court. Associated Press
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 8, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Dividing 5-4, the Supreme Court yesterday gave governments at all levels the authority to give out information from official files selectively, allowing groups to get the data only if they will use it in ways that officials approve.In the first significant ruling of the court's term, the justices split in reinstating a California law that permits police to release records of suspects' arrests, but only to groups that promise not to use the data for commercial purposes.The court in the past has ruled that the Constitution imposes no duty on the government to make public anything that is in official files.
NEWS
May 12, 1998
The Miami Herald said in an editorial Sunday:WHEN the U.S. Supreme Court splits five ways from Sunday on a matter that even has justices in the majority disagreeing among themselves, Congress ought to revisit the troublesome law at issue.Recently, the court upheld a law that makes distinctions between fathers and mothers when determining the citizenship of their children. The law was written in 1940 and amended in 1986. It provides that children born abroad and out of wedlock are deemed Americans if their mothers are. But if a child is born to a non-American mother, his or her American father must acknowledge parenthood before the child reaches 18 years of age.The case before the court involved a young woman, Lorelyn Miller, born in the Philippines in 1970.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | July 26, 1993
IT SEEMS LIKE only yesterday that Clarence Thomas told the Senate Judiciary he had never discussed Roe vs. Wade even in private, and Democratic senators all but called him a liar.But it wasn't last week, it was two years ago. Yesterday (figuratively speaking; actually it was last Thursday) Ruth Bader Ginsburg was telling the committee that she had never, ever discussed the death penalty, and the same Democrats, Joseph Biden, Edward Kennedy, Howard Metzenbaum, uttered not a word of skepticism.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | July 26, 1993
IT SEEMS LIKE only yesterday that Clarence Thomas told the Senate Judiciary he had never discussed Roe vs. Wade even in private, and Democratic senators all but called him a liar.But it wasn't last week, it was two years ago. Yesterday (figuratively speaking; actually it was last Thursday) Ruth Bader Ginsburg was telling the committee that she had never, ever discussed the death penalty, and the same Democrats, Joseph Biden, Edward Kennedy, Howard Metzenbaum, uttered not a word of skepticism.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | July 20, 1993
Boston. -- Not long ago, the leaders of a local NOW chapter dreamed up the perfect T-shirt for their membership. On the front it would read: ''I'm a radical feminist.'' On the back: ''Unless, of course, you think I'm too conservative.''It's a shame the T-shirt never got into production. I'd like to send one to Ruth Bader Ginsburg to wear under her dressed-for-judicial-success suit today at the Senate confirmation hearings for the Supreme Court. Ever since the diminutive and reserved appeals-court judge accepted the nomination, she's been regarded suspiciously by conservatives, but also warily by some feminists.
NEWS
July 24, 1993
Supreme Court nominee Ruth Bader Ginsburg was as vague as possible in answering pointed questions in her confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee. Some members of the committee chided her. But her refusal to hint how she might vote in particular cases was as traditional as some of the senators' attempts at entrapment.Judge Ginsburg explained what the senators already knew: Without reading the briefs, listening to the oral arguments, researching precedents, conferring with colleagues, a justice cannot -- or at least should not -- have an opinion on a case.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | July 20, 1993
Boston. -- Not long ago, the leaders of a local NOW chapter dreamed up the perfect T-shirt for their membership. On the front it would read: ''I'm a radical feminist.'' On the back: ''Unless, of course, you think I'm too conservative.''It's a shame the T-shirt never got into production. I'd like to send one to Ruth Bader Ginsburg to wear under her dressed-for-judicial-success suit today at the Senate confirmation hearings for the Supreme Court. Ever since the diminutive and reserved appeals-court judge accepted the nomination, she's been regarded suspiciously by conservatives, but also warily by some feminists.
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