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By Josh Mitchell and Josh Mitchell,SUN STAFF | August 27, 2002
Government documents accuse noted Maryland con woman Deborah Kolodner, the subject of a federal investigation into alleged real estate fraud, of asking a man to kill her probation officer in 1999. Kolodner is jailed awaiting a hearing to determine whether she will be returned to prison for violating the terms of a 1998 mail fraud conviction. In the latest allegations against her, prosecutors say that Kolodner asked an unidentified man to kill Renata Ramsburg, a federal probation agent who had tracked and chronicled Kolodner's recent suspected activities.
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NEWS
By Josh Mitchell and Josh Mitchell,SUN STAFF | August 27, 2002
Government documents accuse noted Maryland con woman Deborah Kolodner, the subject of a federal investigation into alleged real estate fraud, of asking a man to kill her probation officer in 1999. Kolodner is jailed awaiting a hearing to determine whether she will be returned to prison for violating the terms of a 1998 mail fraud conviction. In the latest allegations against her, prosecutors say that Kolodner asked an unidentified man to kill Renata Ramsburg, a federal probation agent who had tracked and chronicled Kolodner's recent suspected activities.
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NEWS
By MATTHEW DOLAN and MATTHEW DOLAN,SUN REPORTER | July 18, 2006
According to his attorney, Darius Spence was the perfect mark: a heroin addict so desperate for a fix that he would "test" the product for his longtime friend before the drug dealer would buy the goods in New York City. His unusual role as a human "guinea pig" for a major drug organization led to his appearance in federal court yesterday. Spence, 35, of Baltimore was sentenced to more than 11 1/2 years in prison for heroin possession. Chief' U.S. District Judge Benson E. Legg said that the length of the sentence could be attributed in large part to Spence's designation as a career offender.
NEWS
By Josh Mitchell and Josh Mitchell,SUN STAFF | August 27, 2002
Government documents accuse noted Maryland con woman Deborah Kolodner, the subject of a federal investigation into alleged real estate fraud, of asking a man to kill her probation officer in 1999. Kolodner is in jail awaiting a hearing to determine whether she will be sent back to prison for violating the terms of a 1998 mail fraud conviction. In the latest allegations against her, prosecutors say that Kolodner asked an unidentified man to kill Renata Ramsburg, a federal probation agent who had tracked and chronicled Kolodner's recent suspected activities.
NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,SUN STAFF | December 12, 1996
A Baltimore man named by police as a suspect in a 1995 Loch Raven double homicide was convicted yesterday in U.S. District Court in Baltimore of robbing two Baltimore County banks.The jury deliberated about 2 1/2 hours before convicting Michael Zenone, 27, of robbing and of aiding and abetting in holdups at the Mercantile-Safe Deposit and Trust Co. in White Marsh on April 12 and First Virginia Bank in Towson on April 26.Zenone was acquitted on two federal weapons charges.The trial, which began Monday, was Zenone's second on the robbery charges.
BUSINESS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | February 28, 2003
Thomas Bray, former chief financial officer of the now-defunct Network Technologies Group Inc., became the second company official to plead guilty to one count of fraud yesterday in the case of a Baltimore telecommunications firm that collapsed amid an accounting scandal. As part of a plea agreement with the U.S. attorney's office, nine counts of wire, mail and bank fraud against Bray are to be dismissed at sentencing. "The statement of facts make it clear that Mr. Bray's sin is one of omission, not commission," Gerald C. Ruter, Bray's attorney, said after the defendant's appearance in U.S. District Court in Baltimore yesterday.
BUSINESS
By Stephanie Hanes and Stephanie Hanes,SUN STAFF | May 26, 2004
A federal judge sentenced the chief financial officer of the former Network Technologies Group Inc. yesterday to a year in prison for his involvement in an accounting fraud that helped destroy the Baltimore telecommunications company. U.S. District Judge J. Frederick Motz noted that Thomas Bray of Kingsville took responsibility for his actions and cooperated with prosecutors. But the crime, the judge said, "for all the reasons I could pontificate on, has to carry a prison sentence." Motz also ordered that Bray pay $980,000 in restitution.
NEWS
By Kelly Gilbert and Kelly Gilbert,Evening Sun Staff | December 18, 1990
The long arm of justice may reach from Baltimore to the Bahamas today as four defense lawyers and a prosecutor take a deposition from a federal fugitive on the island of Exuma.The deposition hearing was prompted by a defense attorney in an international drug case tied to the Florida-to-Western Maryland distribution network of convicted gang leaders Marshall L. Jones and Steven A. Silvers. The current case is scheduled for trial next month in U.S. District Court in Baltimore.Today's deposition hearing represents the first time a prosecutor from the U.S. attorney's office here has ever gone out of the country to take sworn testimony from a fugitive.
NEWS
By Tanya Jones and Tanya Jones,Sun Staff Writer | December 7, 1994
Seven years after he turned down a plea agreement and declined to testify at his own trial, Steven A. Silvers took the stand in federal court yesterday and admitted to laundering drug profits, delivering cocaine and collecting drug payments.His extraordinary, last-minute testimony was part of a hearing he hoped would overturn his 1988 conviction for operating a criminal enterprise and get him a new trial or at least get a new sentencing hearing.Silvers has charged that he was wrongly convicted on drug-kingpin charges because a prosecution witness lied during his trial.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | September 10, 2002
The latest skirmish in an eight-year battle between two factions in Little Italy began playing out in a Baltimore courtroom yesterday, as the president of the neighborhood's community organization sued his nemeses for $500,000. Plaintiff Roberto Marsili, president of the Little Italy Community Organization, accused community residents Rosa Aquia and her daughter Gia Blatterman of making false accusations against him, court documents show. He also contends that they have "abused" the civil justice process by bringing a harassment suit and other legal action against him. Aquia and Blatterman argue that Marsili's suit is a "malicious prosecution action."
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